Canadian Chapter of ACHE

Fall 2019

Message from Your Board Chair

It is amazing to me that another year is coming to a close. Each seems to move more quickly than the year before. For our Chapter, this has been a year of tremendous progress, despite the rapid pace.

 

Dear Fellow Canadian Chapter Members,

It is amazing to me that another year is coming to a close. Each seems to move more quickly than the year before. For our Chapter, this has been a year of tremendous progress, despite the rapid pace.

We have been working more closely with the Canadian College of Health Leaders (CCHL) to support a closer relationship between ACHE and CCHL. This has led to a second year of hosting a session at the November BC Health Leaders Conference. We are also working closely with the GTA CCHL Chapter, partnering on education and networking events for 2020.

We have updated our Chapter Bylaws and restructured the geographic representation of our Board. We now have 50% of our Board elected based on the country’s regions (East, Central, West) and 50% of our directors elected based on the distribution of membership across these regions. Our Chapter year is now January 1 – December 31, which will see our Director and Executive positions turn over at the end of December.

We will welcome three board members to their first term on the Board in January: Shawn Drake, Francisco Grajales, and Allan Katz. At this time, Todd Stepanuik, Vice Chair of the Chapter Board for the past two years will be stepping into the role of Chair. I am grateful for his support during my term as Chair. His counsel has always been wise and I am excited for his leadership of the Chapter. He is a true leader and his passion for ACHE will propel our chapter forward.

At the close of the year, we will also see David Matear, FACHE, complete his term on the board. With his recent relocation to the United States, he will not stand for a second term. In addition to representing B.C. on the board, he has chaired the Chapter Program Committee this year. We have benefited greatly from his dedication and penchant for action. He has laid a strong foundation that will guide us to success going forward. We will also see Paula Neves, PhD, depart from the board. She has steered our Communications Committee for two years and worked diligently to expand and improve our newsletter content. Her commitment to transitioning the committee to the next chair will ensure continuity for our membership. Paula; David: thank you for giving of your time and talents in service to our Chapter. Your hard work is so appreciated.

I would also like to congratulate our Service Award recipients for 2019: Leslie Benecki, FACHE, Rakesh Calton, M.D., FACHE, Glenn Gale, James Haney, FACHE, Raj Sewda, FACHE, and Todd Stepanuik. Please check out their bios under Chapter Service Awards in the Membership section of the ACHE Canada website. We are stronger for their service and I am proud to congratulate them on their awards.

As I complete my term as Chair, I want to say thank you to our members. I am far richer for having had the opportunity to serve you and support our chapter. I have known for years the incredible depth and breadth of talent in our membership ranks. It has been a privilege to see it up close during my tenure. A special thanks to the board members for your ongoing commitment to our chapter. It has been a pleasure to serve with you.

And for those members in the East and West regions, we have vacancies on the board in these regions. Why not join this distinguished table and share your leadership? I would be so pleased to chat with you about what is involved. Please connect with me at froesch@gmail.com or 519-239-9903.

Frances C. Roesch, B.P.R., M.H.A., FACHE, is Chair of the Canadian Chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives and Director of Administration, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, in the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.

ACHE Canada Member Spotlight: Leslie Benecki

Member Spotlight profiles thoughtful and accomplished leaders at various stages of their career.

In this Spotlight, meet ACHE Canadian Chapter Treasurer, Leslie Benecki.

By Todd Stepanuik

 

TS: Provide an overview of your background and career.

LB: After receiving my Bachelor of Science at Purdue University, I worked as a Registered Dietitian.  I went to the University of Michigan for a Masters in Health Services Administration and a MBA.  As a big proponent of lifelong learning, I also have certificates in Quality Improvement (University of Toronto) and Accounting (St. Lawrence College).

I’ve had an eclectic career as a result of being a “trailing spouse”. Most of my career has been focused on the intersection of primary health care and equity seeking populations.  My experience includes progressive managerial roles at Alberta Health, two Community Health Centres, a university-based health policy research centre, and some consulting, too.  I’ve been an active volunteer including a Board term with the South East Local Health Integration Network, and, of course, activities with ACHE.

It’s been a fun ride and I’m looking forward to my next adventure!


TS: What has been one of the most important lessons you have learned during your career?

LB: Every organization has its own unique culture, and the closer the match the better. The very same attributes you bring to a workplace can be considered significant contributions or pesky irritants depending on your cultural fit.  Find a place where your personal values match the mission and you are truly valued by the organization.


TS: How has or how does ACHE help you address the challenges you face?

LB: Through ACHE, I’ve had the opportunity to meet and work with some amazing people, especially as I moved to different communities due to family commitments.  Reading the ACHE magazines and books, and attending educational events has helped me keep up with changes in healthcare.  The ACHE Career Resource Center offers excellent tools and I’d recommend them to anyone, regardless of their career stage.


TS: How has or how does ACHE help you address the challenges you face?

LB: Through ACHE, I’ve had the opportunity to meet and work with some amazing people, especially as I moved to different communities due to family commitments.  Reading the ACHE magazines and books, and attending educational events has helped me keep up with changes in healthcare.  The ACHE Career Resource Center offers excellent tools and I’d recommend them to anyone, regardless of their career stage.


TS: What is the greatest challenge you have confronted during your career?

LB: In every challenge there is an opportunity, right? I suppose being in a family relationship, which has required me to step back from roles on several occasions, has been a challenge.  The opportunity is that I’ve done some neat things and have had variety in my work.  I’ve even published peer reviewed journal articles.  And, I’ve been able to be there for my family, which has been a key priority for me.


TS: What has been your most rewarding experience?

LB: Over the years there have been many rewarding moments, including a successful start-up of Kitchener Downtown CHC. Seeing people I’ve hired working well in their jobs, and supporting folks to grow into pivotal leadership positions have been career highlights. 


TS: How have you seen the healthcare management field change during your career?

LB: Years ago there was a real strong focus on acute care and limited discourse on prevention or other factors, which influence health.  Now the intersection of primary care and social determinants of health is much more common. We are making progress in working toward overall health and wellbeing as a goal instead of the more traditional focus on fixing a particular disease or injury. Data analytics and overall technology advancements are changing everything, including the healthcare landscape. We are entering a vastly new era of ethical dilemmas as life and death tradeoffs becomes more fluid and complicated.

   
TS: Who have been your mentors?

LB: It might sound silly, but my parents have been my lifelong mentors. My mom helps me stay resilient and my dad, a retired CEO and consultant in industry, consistently offers sage advice. In healthcare, I’ve greatly appreciated the support from so many people.  Dr. Tom Noseworthy and I were on the board of the Boyle McCauley Health Centre and he helped me in my early years in Canada. Within ACHE, I am particularly grateful to Joe Mapa for encouraging me and providing me opportunities while he was the ACHE Regent for Canada. Terry Fadelle and I were on the Canadian Chapter of ACHE board together.  He generously offered perspective and practical suggestions, and helped me become a better leader and collaborator.

    
TS: What lessons have you learned as an executive leader?

LB: It is essential to remain true to yourself and your values.  Healthcare as a field has plenty of opportunities for this to occur. The expression, “perception is more powerful than truth” is something to always keep in mind.  It has been my observation that people often erroneously assume their best strengths (e.g., numbers, interpersonal skills, teamwork, cheerleading) are also easy for others.  If we all used the kindest interpretation to situations, it would help mitigate unnecessary misperceptions and mutual misunderstandings.


TS: What is the best advice you ever received?

LB: My high school band instructor taught us to “Go for it!”  It is so true. Working toward a common goal takes a lot of effort and commitment. Perseverance is worth it.  Take risks and follow your heart.


TS: Provide an overview of your most recent role with Kingston Community Health Centres

LB: From 2011 to early 2019, I worked in a variety of roles at Kingston Community Health Centres, a $25 million multi-site organization providing a wide array of primary and allied health care along with supports to help people have a strong foundation related to various social determinants of health.  My most recent role was Director of Organizational Health which included all back office corporate roles (i.e., most responsible staff for finance, privacy, human resources, etc.).  In winter 2019, I left work to get ready for another family transition. I’m not sure exactly what the future holds, but I look forward to the journey.


TS: What words of wisdom would you as a mentor and role model share with aspiring healthcare leaders?

LB: One saying in the quality improvement literature is, “If you want to go fast, go alone.  If you want to go far, go together.” The majority of healthcare activities require collaboration with others.  Take time to learn from others, to build trust, and support one another. You will have maximum success if you do this at all levels: with staff, peers, and superiors. ACHE and other professional organizations offer lots of opportunities to build relationships and grow.  The more you contribute to the profession, the better it is for everyone. 


TS: Anything else you might wish to share?

LB: Always keep learning and read widely.  Gail Warden, President Emeritus of Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan, says, “leaders are readers.” Perhaps you could even consider a book or journal club with others!

 

Leslie Benecki is Treasurer of the Canadian Chapter of ACHE and a recipient of the 2019 Chapter Service Awards. Connect with her on LinkedIN.

New & Noteworthy in Canadian Healthcare

In this regular feature of the quarterly newsletter, we highlight a diverse selection of new and noteworthy articles, reports, data and tools of interest to Canadian healthcare leaders. We welcome your feedback.

Here, we highlight a diverse selection of new and noteworthy articles, reports, data and tools of interest to Canadian healthcare leaders. To view previous issues of New & Noteworthy, click here

 

Recent Reports

    National Health Expenditures, 1975-2019, CIHI, Oct 2019

    Comparing Performance of Universal Health Care Countries, Fraser Institute, Oct 2019

    The Future of Connected Care, Reporting Canadians' Perspective on the Canadian Health Care System, CMA/IPSOS Aug 2019

    Public Health Care. We've Got This, Canadian Health Coalition, June 2019

    The Health of LGBTQIA2 Communities in Canada, Report of the Standing Committee on Health, Jun 2019

    Catalyst for Change, Report of the Special Senate Committee on the Charitable Sector, Jun 2019

    Care Closer to Home: Elements of High Performing Home and Community Healthcare Services, North American Observatory on Health Systems and Policies and Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Apr 2019

     

    Research Articles

    Sexual Orientation and Complete Mental Health, H Gilmour, Health Reports 30(11): 3-10, Nov 20, 2019

    The Prevalence of Vaping and Smoking among Adolescents in Canada, England and the United States, D Hammond et al, BMJ 2019; 365: I2219.

    Capacity of Kidney Care in Canada: Identifying Barriers and Opportunities, M Lunney et al, Can J Kidney Health Dis 2019: 6.
     
    Optimization of Home Care Nurses in Canada: a scoping review. R Ganann et al, Health Soc Care Community 2019 Sep 27(5): e604-e621.

    Data, Tools & Resources

    Canadian Cancer Statistics, Canadian Cancer Society, Sep 2019

    Health Fact Sheets, Statistics Canada, Oct 2019

    CMA Physician Workforce Survey, CMA, 2019

    OECD Interactive Tool: International Comparisons, Nov 2019

    Patient Experience in Canadian Hospitals, Apr 2019

     

    Upcoming Releases / Events / News

    Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)

    Longwoods Publishing

    ICES

    CPSI Patient Safety Alerts & News

    Canadian Health Care Technology News


    Do you have a resource or publication that should be featured in future editions of New & Newsworthy? Please email your recommendations for future content to achecanada@achemail.net.

    Message from Your Canadian Regent

    Well, it is seems like 2019 has flown by and we will be ringing in a New Year 2020.  The Canadian Chapter has seen another year of many new changes.

     

    Dear Colleagues,

    Well, it is seems like 2019 has flown by and we will be ringing in a New Year 2020.  The Canadian Chapter has seen another year of many new changes.

    Elections for leadership positions with ACHE Chicago took place this past fall, and new Chairman Officers and Governors will begin to serve their terms in March 2020 at Congress.  ACHE Chicago continues to move forward on the strategic plans outlined over the last 2 years. Next year there will be a “deeper dive” into advancing and addressing key initiatives within the Association and all of their partners.

    As the Chair of the Canadian Chapter Nominations Committee it gives me pleasure to welcome our four newly elected members to the Board of Directors.  I wish them each well in their terms and look forward to their contributions to our chapter leadership team.  If you want to meet new people, learn about cutting edge issues in health care, and make a difference to our profession, consider getting in contact with our Board members and join a committee.  Now is the time to step forward and get involved!

    Partnerships continue to be fostered with our Chapter.  Last month our Chapter had a ACHE event held at the CCHL - BC Health Leaders Conference.  This was well attended and provided a focus on health care safety and a really good opportunity through networking for those members in attendance.  As this partnership between CCHL and ACHE continues to grow, stay tuned for more multi-disciplinary events to engage our diverse membership with the potential to engage other professional partners in our country to our chapter events.

    Work with all of our Canadian Universities is slow and continues to focus upon meaningful engagement of our students and promoting membership in ACHE.  We currently have two Universities within our Higher University Networks (HEN). These are: University of Alberta and McMaster University... and we need to widen our circle and number of HEN’s. 

    Some other items for everyone to consider are:

    ACHE Congress:  The Annual Congress on Healthcare Leadership is being held March 23-26, 2020 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.  This years theme is Connected, Inspired & Empowered. I hope you will consider attending ACHE’s signature event and while in Chicago join the Canadian Chapter Dinner.  Please stay tuned for the save the date and more details. 

    ACHE Membership Renewal:  It is membership renewal time, and I do encourage everyone to continue to renew their membership and to get a friend/colleague to join too!  You will be glad you did this, as being apart of ACHE has a marked impact on your career.  ACHE is considered a premier professional society for health care leaders dedicated to improving health care delivery.

    Regent Awards:  Please consider nominating a fellow member for this Award.  Applications will be accepted in early 2020 for this annual award.  Stay tuned for a future email.

    I want to thank you all for the opportunity to serve as your Regent for Canada in 2019 and to work with a unique group of leaders in our chapter.  This position continues to be a passion and labour of love for me in our health care field!

    I wish you and yours a very happy and healthy holiday season and most of all, a prosperous New Year! 

    With enthusiasm,


    Danielle K Swerhone  RN, FACHE, FCCHL

    Regent for Canada

    Learn the Art of Dialogue and Have Open, Productive Conversations

    Open and productive conversation is absolutely critical in today’s high-velocity business environment. If our conversations go nowhere, failure will quickly follow.

    Open and productive conversation is absolutely critical in today’s high-velocity business environment. If our conversations go nowhere, failure will quickly follow.

    The problem is that most of us think we are having conversations when we really are not. We often participate in one-way conversations–essentially monologues: I tell you what I want to tell you. You tell me what you want to tell me (or you tell me what you think I want to hear so I’ll leave you alone). We excel at taking turns talking, but neither side is exploring and discovering and building on what is being said. When this happens, the promise of a new discovery or breakthrough is lost. So we aren’t solving problems and are often creating them.

    There is a difference between what typically passes for conversation and true dialogue. If two people are engaged in a dialogue, at least one of them can dependably benefit from the other’s experiences. That is why it is important to learn the art of dialogue and practice it daily in all communications. To help promote the art of dialogue, you must be curious about another's point of view and willing to:

    • State your own view and ask others for their reactions
    • Be wrong
    • Accept that you may be unaware of certain facts
    • Remain open to new information
    • Change your mind
    • Interpret how others are thinking and reacting and seek to understand their underlying feelings

    Dialogue lets us discover more of our own intelligence and blend it with the knowledge and wisdom of others. Clear and powerful agreements can result from dialogue, whereas little worthwhile insight is likely to come from simultaneous monologues. These types of ineffective conversations can lead to a reactive cycle, in which people react instead of participate. If left unchecked, the reactive cycle can do more than kill the productivity of a conversation and even damage relationships.

    A reactive cycle starts when someone says something with which you don’t agree, or may even strongly dislike. In a split second, your emotions are triggered and you may feel threatened or defensive. You react by attempting to control the situation, the person or retaliating. Doing so may trigger the other person's emotions, causing that person to now attempt to gain control, which, in turn, causes you to react again. This back-and-forth emotional interplay—this reactive cycle—results in another unproductive conversation or meeting.

    There are three steps that can be taken to break a reactive cycle:

    1. Identify it; where one of the parties notices the reactive cycle and literally “calls it out.”
    2. One or both of the parties claim their responsibility for being reactive.
    3. Both parties try to understand their own–and the other’s–viewpoints and emotions, and attempt to enter into a true dialogue by reframing their perspectives.

    After we have named, claimed and re-framed a reactive cycle, we can engage in the type of open, honest and productive discussion needed to accomplish mutual objectives. By learning the art of dialogue we help ensure that everyone is on the same page and moving forward in the same direction.

    —Adapted from "Learn the Art of Dialogue and Have Open, Productive Conversations," O'Brien Group.

    Learning Corner

    A selection of books, podcasts and videos on leadership, healthcare and more

    Here's what ACHE Canada members are reading, viewing and listening to. What's on your list?

    Below is an eclectic selection of podcasts, videos and books ACHE Canada members are listening to, reading and recommending. Do you have a book, podcast or video recommendation? Email achecanada@achemail.net and tell us why it should be on everyone's list!

     

    PODCASTS

    The Brainfluence Podcast

    Conversations with thought leaders in business, communications and the art and science of persuasion. Episode transcripts also available for those who prefer to scan content quickly.

    The Happiness Lab

    Psychologist, Dr Laurie Santos uses stories and research to show what makes us (un)happy.

    Behind the Breakthrough

    UHN's new podcast series offering a deep dive on world-leading UHN researchers and their amazing breakthroughs.

     

    VIDEOS & ONLINE LEARNING

    Breakfast with the Chiefs

    Seminal talks by Canadian health care leaders from Longwoods

    The Pinkcast

    Bite-sized tips for "working smarter and living better," from best-selling author, Daniel Pink.

    Patient Engagement Resources

    Practical tools and more from the Canadian Patient Safety Institute

    FACHE Board of Governances Exam Reference List 

    Core selection of readings to deepen your mastery of healthcare management and leadership plus online tutorials from ACHE.

     

    BOOKS (Available online or at book seller near you)

    The Collective Wisdom of High-Performing Women. Leadership Lessons from the Judy Project, edited by Colleen Moorehead

    Joyful Journey, Adventures in Eldercare by Grace Sweatman

    The Effective Hiring Manager by Mark Horstman

    The Infinite Game by Simon Sinek

     

    For past recommendations visit the Learning Centre on www.canada.ache.org

     


     

     

    ACHE Canadian Member Spotlight: Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite

    Member Spotlight profiles thoughtful and accomplished leaders at various stages of their career.

    This Spotlight focuses on healthcare leader, Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite.

    by Todd Stepanuik


    TS: Provide an overview of your background and career

    MSB: I have been privileged to be a nurse since 1982, which provided me a solid grounding of how important the role of nursing is in the Health Care System. I worked as a Critical Care Nurse while completing a MScN at U of T. After I graduated, I was lucky to be a Clinical Nurse Specialist at Sunnybrook Hospital. Then I journeyed into Management in 1991 as a Manager of the PACU, Director of Nursing and then returned to school to complete my MBA.  I was striving to understand the world of business and how it impacted Health Care Decision Making.  An opportunity presented to be the VP Professional Affairs and Chief Nursing Officer in BC at the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority.  After several CEO changes and re-applying for nursing leadership roles, it was time to return to Ontario. I went to the non-acute care sector at Providence Care as the VP Programs and CNO.  Next, a few years spent consulting with SteriPro Canada and Shouldice Hospital while completing my Doctorate in Business Administration at Northcentral University.  Then in 2016, my adventure continued in Nova Scotia as the Senior Director, Perioperative/Surgical Services for the Nova Scotia Health Authority.


    TS: What has been one of the most important lessons you have learned during your career?

    MSB: Always lead with integrity, be authentic, honest, moral and ethical.  Never let the negative things that happen keep you down, become a risk taker, a tempered radical and pursue your passion – always Trust the Process!


    TS: How has or how does ACHE help you address the challenges you face?

    MSB: Through ACHE, I’ve had the opportunity to meet and work with some amazing people, especially as I moved to different communities due to family commitments.  Reading the ACHE magazines and books, and attending educational events has helped me keep up with changes in healthcare.  The ACHE Career Resource Center offers excellent tools and I’d recommend them to anyone, regardless of their career stage.


    TS: How has or how does ACHE help you address the challenges you face?

    MSB: The ACHE has helped me thrive with my quest for understanding leadership styles, behaviours, and providing a strong venue for networking.  I have met great leaders across Canada and the U.S through ACHE.  I have served as the Canadian Chapter of ACHE Board Chair.  Being a volunteer brings rewards and gratitude.  


    TS: What has been your most rewarding experience?

    MSB: Working with my trusted colleagues across the healthcare sector to provide quality patient centered care during times of chaos, uncertainty and ambiguity.  I have always been a visionary and know how to attain results.  I love making a difference to care delivery.


    TS: How have you seen the healthcare management field change during your career?

    MSB: Over the years, the Healthcare System has become more uncertain and risk averse.  There is a lack of strong authentic leaders who are willing to take risks at all costs and drive outcomes.  We are great at process, pilots and discussions but less great at driving the system and executing for results.  For some reason we have become more uncertain and fear change.  I love change and driving for results.  Life is too short to sit by and watch – we must be the change!
        

    TS: Who have been your mentors?

    MSB: I have had several mentors and coaches.  I believe everyone needs their own career coach to provide guidance, support and push outside one’s comfort zone. Some of my mentors/supports have been Dr. Judith Shamian, Todd Stepanuik, Joseph Mapa, Dr. Arun Jain and Parker Knox.  I appreciate each and every one of them.

         
    TS: What lessons have you learned as an executive leader?

    MSB: Always be true to self, spend time reflecting, journaling, learning and growing.  Never shy away from constructive criticism.  Push the bar hard, push yourself to strive for what you want to be and do not let those who are critical, bullies or disrespectful rob you of your belief in yourself.  You are a leader and matter.  There will always be critics who are jealous, paranoid and hurtful, they do not matter.  Spend time with those who are supportive, acknowledge your contributions and value you as a true authentic leader!


    TS: What is the best advice you ever received?

    MSB: Believe in yourself, trust the process and never give up.  Your passion, compassion and nurturing self are what matters.  Never stop learning and growing!


    TS: Looking to the future, what are some of the changes you see coming to the health system that leaders must be prepared to face?

    MSB: I think we need to become stronger in our beliefs that we can have a healthy healthcare system.  WE need to all pull our weight and work more collaboratively to sustain the great healthcare delivery system we have built.  It takes lots of dedication and hard work to improve accessibility, responsiveness and efficiency.  We need to become data richer, make evidence based decisions and drive the next decade with more force, data and evidence.  This is a time for innovation, discovery and collaboration.  Status quo is not a word we should have in our vocabulary.   


    TS: What inspired you to pursue a career in healthcare, and what challenges did you overcome to get where you are now?

    MSB: My mother’s mother inspired me.  She had been blessed with two handicap children who I helped care for as a youngster.  I learned that God only gives you what you can handle.  That life is not about fairness or justice.  Life is about learning how to handle grief, challenges, unhappiness and still believing in each other.  My grandmother taught me life was about doing for others – not being selfish – one was here to serve others.  This all came to light when in nursing school I had a patient who rang her call bell continuously.  The staff nurses refused to answer Lucy’s call bell.  I went to Lucy’s room and she said I dropped my bible my dear, could you pick it up so I could pray before I go to bed.  I picked up her bible, comforted Lucy, tidied up her bed and provided her evening care.  She was so grateful and said that I was her “angel of mercy”.  I never forgot those words; I was so blessed to have encountered so many impressive people like Lucy over the years.


    TS: What books are you reading at the moment?

    MSB: Books on leadership, self-awareness and mindfulness.


    TS: What are your views on effective healthcare leadership and the primary leadership skills need to be successful today?

    MSB: I view leadership as an art where one needs to continually invest in self to perfect themselves.  This investment entails self-awareness, mindfulness, self-belief and learning from others.  It entails being authentic, driven, ethical and patient focused.  One needs to be innovative and a risk taker.  It is not good enough to debate and not take action.  We must become action oriented, driven and go for strong results. Today’s leaders must treat others as they wish to be treated, walk the talk, do not just talk the talk. Trust each other, respect each other and keep healthy work environments where we can thrive together for those we serve.


    TS: How do you achieve work-life balance?

    MSB: I am an avid journaller.  I journal every day, reflect, think and reflect.  I continually strive to be self-aware and know when I need Marcy time.  I teach my coaching clients that if they have a pie with 8 slices they should maintain 3 to 4 slices for them. In my house, we know that when I need “Marcy Time” it is important to my survival and my ability to recharge my batteries.  I love to walk, read, cook, bake and spend time with my family.  I am grateful and proud of my three children, their spouses, and my granddaughter.  I always say, “Family come first”.  We are all replaceable at work; do not forgot to invest in our families and ourselves. Be thankful for all you have and make sure you celebrate your successes!  As my friend/coach, Parker Knox told me - practice saying three words every morning in front of your bathroom mirror – “YOU ARE GREAT!”

     

    Dr. Marcy Saxe-Braithwaite is Senior Director, Perioperative/Surgical Services at the Nova Scotia Health Authority. Connect with her on LinkedIN.

     

     

    ACHE News | Q4

    Tailored professional development, Call for Submissions for Management Innovations Poster Session at 2020 Congress of Health Care Leaders, FACHE Certification and more.

    ACHE News | Q4
     
    Let us Bring the Experts to You
    Choice is ACHE's tailored professional development series designed to close competency gaps and meet individual educational needs within your organization. Choice programming offers professional development that is convenient and with a cadence that works best for your group. These programs, categorized in a meaningful way, focus on topics that affect executives and leaders in the healthcare field. During the planning phase, you have options for who, what, where, when and how programs are tailored. Additionally, every program is led by a respected ACHE expert speaker, facilitator or author possessing a real-world perspective.
     
    Whether you are interested in hosting a single or multi-day program, or already have existing leadership development but want to enhance your programming, let us know. Visit ache.org/Choice or contact Catie L. Russo, program specialist, ACHE Department of Professional Development, at (312) 424-9362 or crusso@ache.org for more information.
     
     
    Call For Proposals: Management Innovations Poster Session   
    ACHE invites authors to submit narratives of their posters for consideration during the 36th annual Management Innovations Poster Session to be held at ACHE’s 2020 Congress on Healthcare Leadership. This is a unique opportunity for authors to share the innovative work their organizations are doing with other healthcare leaders.

    We are interested in innovations addressing issues affecting your organization that might be helpful to others, including improving quality or efficiency, improving patient or physician satisfaction, implementation of EHRs, uses of new technology and similar topics. All accepted applicants are expected to be available to discuss their posters on Monday, March 23, between 7–8 a.m. Posters will remain on display March 23–25 at Congress.

    Please go to ache.org/CongressPosterSession for the full selection criteria. Submit narratives as an email attachment to PosterSessions@ache.org by Jan. 21, 2020
     
     
    Consider Applying for FACHE®       
    The importance of earning the distinction of board certification as an ACHE Fellow cannot be overstated. Consider taking the next step in advancing your career and achieving your professional goals. The FACHE designation benefits the healthcare management profession and demonstrates a healthcare leader’s competence, leadership skills and commitment to excellence in the field. 
     
    The Board of Governors Exam is the final step on the journey to recognition. Applicants who pass the Exam and successfully meet all other requirements by Dec. 31, 2019, will be eligible to participate in the Convocation Ceremony at the 2020 Congress on Healthcare Leadership.
     
     
    Access Complimentary Resources for the BOG Exam
    ACHE offers complimentary resources for Members beginning the journey toward board certification and the FACHE® credential. These resources are designed to help them succeed so they can be formally recognized for their competency, professionalism, ethical decision making and commitment to lifelong learning.
     
    The Board of Governors Exam Outline is the blueprint for the BOG Exam. Every question on the Exam is associated with one of the knowledge or skill statements found in this outline. The Reference Manual includes a list of recommended readings, test-taker comments and study tips. Additional resources include a 230-question practice exam and answer key.
     
    FACHE overview webinars provide a general look at the advancement process. Participants will learn how the FACHE credential can earn them the distinction of being the best of the best in healthcare management. The webinars cover the requirements, application process, BOG Exam, study resources and maintenance requirements. Plus, participants have the opportunity to ask questions about the advancement process. An upcoming session is scheduled for Dec. 12. Register online here. A webinar for Canadian Members of ACHE will be held Dec. 10. Please register in advance via the ACHE Canada eventbrite page.
    Additional resources designed to supplement other available study resources are available as well. These include the Board of Governors Review Course, Online Tutorial and Exam Study Bundle.   

     
    Recent Grads: US Fellowship Opportunities at Your Fingertips
    After graduating from a master’s degree program, a postgraduate administrative fellowship can give students and early careerists the competitive edge needed to succeed in their career. A fellowship enhances existing skills in a low-risk setting and provides valuable exposure to the healthcare management field.
     
    The Directory of Postgraduate Administrative Fellowships is up-to-date, easy to use and free. Recent graduates can use it to review and apply for fellowships around the United States that interest them. Each listing includes application deadlines, the program description and instructions on how to apply. In addition, a variety of other resources are available at ache.org/PostGrad.

     
    ACHE Announces Nominating Committee 2020 Slate 
    The ACHE Nominating Committee has agreed on a slate to be presented to the Council of Regents on March 21 at the Council of Regents meeting in Chicago. All nominees have been notified and have agreed to serve if elected. All terms begin at the close of the Council meeting on March 21. The 2020 slate is as follows:

    Nominating Committee Member, District 1 (two-year term ending in 2022)

    Peter J. Wright, FACHE
    President
    Bridgton (Maine) and Rumford Hospitals

    Nominating Committee Member, District 4 (two-year term ending in 2022)

    Jayne E. Pope, FACHE
    CEO
    Hill Country Memorial Hospital
    Fredericksburg, Texas
     
    Nominating Committee Member, District 5 (two-year term ending in 2022)

    John G. Faubion, FACHE
    President
    Faubion Associates Executive Search
    Glendale, Calif.
     
    Governor (three-year term ending in 2023)

    Joanne Carrocino, FACHE
    President/CEO
    Cape Regional Health System
    Cape May Court House, N.J.
     
    Governor (three-year term ending in 2023)

    William P. Santulli, FACHE
    Executive Vice President/COO
    Advocate Healthcare
    Oak Brook, Ill.
     
    Governor (three-year term ending in 2023)

    Michele K. Sutton, FACHE
    President/CEO
    North Oaks Health System
    Hammond, La.
     
    Governor (three-year term ending in 2023)

    Nizar K. Wehbi, MD, FACHE
    Deputy Director, Center for Health Policy and Assistant Professor
    University of Nebraska Medical Center
    Omaha, Neb.
     
    Chairman-Elect

    Carrie Owen Plietz, FACHE
    Executive Vice President/COO, Hospital Division
    WellStar Health System
    Marietta, Ga.
     
    Additional nominations for members of the Nominating Committee may be made from the floor at the annual Council of Regents meeting. Additional nominations for the offices of Chairman-Elect and Governor may be made in the following manner: Any Fellow may be nominated by written petition of at least 15 members of the Council of Regents. Petitions must be received in the ACHE headquarters office (American College of Healthcare Executives, 300 S. Riverside Plaza, Ste. 1900, Chicago, IL 60606-6698) at least 60 days prior to the annual meeting of the Council of Regents. Regents shall be notified in writing of nominations at least 30 days prior to the annual meeting of the Council of Regents.

    Thanks to the members of the Nominating Committee for their contributions in this important assignment:

    Charles D. Stokes, FACHE

    David A. Olson, FACHE

    Chisun S. Chun, FACHE

    Donald G. Henderson, FACHE

    Carle-Marie P. Memnon, FACHE

    David A. Stark, FACHE

    COL Mark D. Swofford, PhD, FACHE

    Michael O. Ugwueke, DHA, FACHE
     
     

    Join the ACHE Official Group on LinkedIn

    Join the ACHE Official Group on LinkedIn today to make new business contacts with other ACHE members and enhance your current relationships with a growing online network of leaders in the healthcare field.

    LinkedIn is a social networking tool to help members exchange information, build contacts and share ideas. To make new business contacts with other ACHE members and enhance your current relationships with a growing online network of leaders in the healthcare field, we encourage you to:

    Both options require a LinkedIn profile. 

     


    General Information

    How to 'Opt-in' to ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter

    We continue to have difficulty reaching Canadian Members of ACHE. To ensure you receive communications from the Canadian Chapter, opt-in...

    Missed an issue of our newsletter? Click here.

    Canadian anti-spam legislation requires those interested in receiving ACHE communications, including Canadian Chapter communications, to "opt-in." If you selected "Do Not Contact" in your ACHE Member profile, please consider updating your preferences. Click here for step-by-step instructions.

    To ensure delivery of your chapter newsletter, please add info@canada.ache.org and achecanada@achemail.net to your email address book or Safe Sender List. 

    If you are still having problems receiving our communications, contact ACHE Customer Service, 312-424-9400, contact@ache.org.