Summer 2018
Greater Charlotte Healthcare Executives Group (GCHEG) Quarterly Newsletter Summer 2018
In This Issue
President's Message
Greetings From Chapter President
Membership and Advancement
Welcome New GCHEG Members
Earn Your Board Certification in Healthcare Management
National News
National News Q2 2018
Two GCHEG Members Participating in Executive Program Presented by ACHE
Career and Articles of Interest
4 Steps to Establishing Your Leadership Philosophy
Enhance Your Decision-Making Skills: 3 Tips
GCHEG Member Submitted Articles
Equity Impact Circle Off To an Impactful Start
NC Chamber Foundation Unveils Healthcare Benchmarking Study
Why Business Coaching Works for Middle Managers
What's In Your Future?
Virtuoso Leadership in Health Care Is Our Responsibility
Share Your Experience and Photos!
Upcoming Events
Summer Events You Don't Want to Miss!
Staying Connected
Engaging with GCHEG on Social Media
Email deliverability
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)
Newsletter Tools
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Career and Articles of Interest
Enhance Your Decision-Making Skills: 3 Tips

Good decision making requires a sense of prediction—how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes—and a sense of judgment—how desirable each of those outcomes is—according to a Harvard Business Review article by Walter Frick.  

Highlighted below are three ways to improve your ability to predict the effects of your choices and assess their desirability.

1. Avoid overconfidence. Consider the fact that you may be more confident about each step of your decision-making process than you ought to be, and that’s OK. If you embrace being less certain, however you may be more likely to revisit the logic of your decision and prepare for dramatically different outcomes than your expected one.

2. Analyze how frequently predicted outcomes occur. Numerous studies demonstrate that the best starting point for predictions is to ask “How often does that typically happen?” Get away from the specifics of your particular decision or individual case, and look at the base rate and outcomes of similar cases first.

3. Learn about probability. Research suggests basic training in probability makes people more effective forecasters and helps them avoid certain cognitive biases. Brushing up on probability theory may help you better express uncertainty and think numerically about the question “How often does this usually happen?”


“Great decision makers don’t follow these rules only when facing a particularly difficult choice; they return to them all the time,” Frick writes. “They recognize that even seemingly easy decisions can be hard—and that they probably know less than they think.”

—Adapted from “3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making,” by Walter Frick, Harvard Business Review, Jan. 22, 2018.


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