Hawai'i-Pacific Chapter
A quarterly e-newsletter for the Hawai'i Pacific Chapter of ACHE Summer 2013
In This Issue
Message from the Regent
Message from the Chapter President
Recent Chapter Events
News from the Education Committee
Summer Calendar of Events
Obtaining your FACHE Credential
Education Calendar of Events
Spring 2013 Financial Report
New Fellows, Recertified Fellows and New Members
Hawaii-Pacific Chapter of ACHE Leadership Development Program
National News - Summer 2013
Other National News
Focus on Professional Growth
Avoid Complacency in Presentations
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)
Newsletter Tools
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CHAPTER OFFICERS
REGENT
Coral Andrews, FACHE
coral@hawaiihealthconnector.com  


PRESIDENT
Martha Smith, FACHE
Martha.Smith@kapiolani.org  


PRESIDENT-ELECT
Darlena Chadwick
dchadwick@queens.org


CHAIR, GUAM LOCAL PROGRAM COUNCIL
LCDR Daren Verhulst, FACHE
Daren.Verhulst@fe.navy.mil  


TREASURER
Steve Robertson, FACHE
Steve.Robertson@hawaiipacifichealth.org  


DIRECTORS
Art Gladstone, FACHE
Art.Gladstone@straub.net

LTC Tanya Peacock, FACHE
peacock4@hawaii.edu  

LCDR Robert Rawleigh
Robert.Rawleigh@med.navy.mil  

Lance Segawa, FACHE
lsegawa1@hhsc.org    


STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
Jennifer Dacumos
Jennifer.Dacumos@palimomi.org  


IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Jen Chahanovich, FACHE
Jen.Chahanovich@palimomi.org

Avoid Complacency in Presentations

You often read about what to do to prevent public-speaking anxiety, specifically for new speakers. However, another problem faces the most seasoned speakers: complacency. Healthcare executives frequently speak about their organization and the field, and they have the speaking practice and thoroughly understand their subject matter. However, they may have stopped connecting with their listeners. Public-speaking expert Lisa Braithwaite offers this advice to fight complacency:

Pay attention to your audience. Research each group of people, and learn what each group will want from you and what they care about. During your presentation, watch their body language and expressions to monitor their engagement.

Update your references. Don’t rely on the same old stories, examples and activities. Keep them fresh so that you appear current.

Reorganize your content. Can you reorder your points? Omit some? Add new ones? A new arrangement can make a presentation you’ve given dozens of times flow better, and the newness of it will recharge you.

Evaluate yourself. Record yourself and watch it later—even if you have been presenting for years. Hand out a survey to the audience after a presentation, and ask for feedback on your performance. Then grade yourself. Would you want to watch your presentation? How can you use the audience feedback to improve your next performance?

—Adapted from “Does Experience = Complacency for Speakers?”  by Lisa Braithwaite, www.coachlisab.com

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Save the Date
ACHE Annual Chapter Breakfast (1.5 credits)
Hawai'i Prince Hotel
July 17, 2013, 7:00AM - 8:00AM


ACHE Military Luncheon (Tentative)
Location TBD
July 25, 2013, 12:00 noon - 1:30PM 


ACHE / HIMSS Panel Discussion (1.5 credits)
Location: TBD
September 12, 2013, 11:30AM - 1:00PM


ACHE Military Luncheon (Tentative)
Location: TBD
October 31, 2013, 12:00 noon - 1:30PM
 

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