Hawai'i-Pacific Chapter
A quarterly e-newsletter for the Hawai'i Pacific Chapter of ACHE Winter 2019 Vol. 4
In This Issue
Messages from Chapter Leadership
Message from the Regent
Message from the Chapter President
Articles of Interest
New CMS Requirement for Advanced Imaging Orders: Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC)
Healthcare Sustainability
Learn the Art of Dialogue and Have Open, Productive Conversations
Diversity
Perspectives on Diversity and Inclusion
Calendars and Recent Events
Calendar of Events
Calendar of Educational Events
News & Committee Updates
News from the Education Committee
News from the Guam Local Program Chapter
Student Corner
Membership Report: New Fellows, Members, and Recertified Fellows
ACHE Resources
ACHE National News
Career Corner
Access Complimentary Resources for the BOG Exam
Disclaimers/Sponsors
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)
Thank you to all our Sponsors
Newsletter Tools
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Poll
From the results of the previous poll, what is your greatest concern regarding protection of patient privacy or data?
Security/Network breach
Third party patient data sharing
Protection of Patient Privacy and Data
Reducing the Medical Cost Curve
Changing Compliance Requirements
CHAPTER OFFICERS

   

 

REGENT
Gidget Ruscetta, BSN, MBA, FACHE
gidget.ruscetta@palimomi.org

PRESIDENT
Darlena Chadwick, MSN, MBA, FACHE
dchadwick@queens.org

PRESIDENT-ELECT
Andrew Giles, MBA, FACHE
andrew.t.giles@kp.org


IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Micah Ewing, MBA, FACHE 
micah.ewing@hawaiipacifichealth.org


CHAIR, GUAM LOCAL COUNCIL
Geojun Wu
wugeojun@gmail.com


TREASURER
Suzie So-Miyahira, MPH, MBA
suzie.so-miyahira@kapiolani.org

SECRETARY
Emiline LaWall, MA
emiline.lawall@hawaiipacifichealth.org


STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
Rachelle Gallegos
rachelleg.0128@gmail.com

PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVE
James C. Lin, MD
jclin@hawaiipacifichealth.org

MILITARY REPRESENTATIVE
Col Kara Gormont, BSN, HSMP-MHA, FACHE
gormont1@yahoo.com

DIRECTORS

Travis Clegg, FACHE, MBA
travis.clegg@ah.org 

Josh Carpenter
josh.carpenter@trane.com

Nick Hughey, RN, MBA, FACHE
nhughey@wcchc.com

Laura Bonilla, BSN, MA, FACHE
laurab@kapiolani.org

Robyn Polinar
robyn.polinar@gmail.com

Carolyn Voulgaridis, JD
carolynvoulgaridis@gmail.com

Robert Diaz, FACHE
robert.d.diaz@kp.org


COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Miguel Guevara, CMRP | Audit
miguel.guevara@af.af.mil

Sally Belles, MBA-HCM, RDN, CDE | Communications
sally.belles@hawaiihealthpartners.org

Maj Jackie Lou E. Kim, USAF | Diversity
jackielou.kim.1@us.af.mil

Jerome Flores | Education
JeromeF@maunalani.org

Andrew Giles, MBA, FACHE | Membership
Andrew.T.Giles@kp.org

Miguel Guevara, CMRP | Nominating
miguel.guevara@af.af.mil 

Micah Ewing, MBA, FACHE | Sponsorship
micah.ewing@hawaiipacifichealth.org

Articles of Interest
Healthcare Sustainability
Kenny Morris, MBA-HCM
Living in Hawaii and on an island, the approach taken with sustainability – in business and in life – is often just a little different than that of our mainland counterparts.  We are seemingly more aware of the effect our actions have on the environment because we can see with our own eyes the microplastics accumulating on our beaches, the trash clogging our streams and riverbanks, and the impact of our waste on the marine animals living in our waters.  We do our best to recycle, to reduce and reuse, and to take our stainless-steel water bottles with us wherever we go in hopes that our actions will help to prevent the effects of our warming planet and rising seas. 
 
But ultimately, our individual actions are insignificant in comparison to the action required for true changes in the way that we as a civilization exist in our world.  To generate real and impactful change, a systemic approach must be employed with stakeholders at all levels of government, industry and community, integrated in the conversion away from unsustainable practices and toward a greener future.  We must fundamentally change ourselves and our society if we truly wish to achieve our sustainability goals.
 
In healthcare, this conversion will prove to be particularly complex, especially where single use devices are utilized to prevent the spread of infections and disease in high acuity and surgical areas.  Hospitals and healthcare in general for this reason must be mindful of the decisions they make surrounding sustainability and the partners they select for implementation.  Quality and patient safety must always be at the forefront of these programs, with evidence-based practice and continuous improvement programs leading the way.  We must act sustainably but not at the expense of patient safety and quality.  From waste management and recycling programs to single use device remanufacturing and reprocessing, hospitals in Hawaii and beyond are already approaching sustainability in healthcare.  Many have formed ‘green teams’ to lead these initiatives and have been successful in implementing grassroots programs to help start the conversation around reducing, reusing and recycling.  Supply chain and purchasing managers, in collaboration with their clinical teams, have begun expanding their single use device reprocessing programs in surgical and non-invasive product lines to both divert waste away from Hawaii landfills and drive supply chain savings.
 
These programs and actions, though important, must be part of a larger, systemic approach to sustainability in healthcare lead by our healthcare leaders.  Until sustainability becomes the foundation upon which decisions are made in healthcare from the C-Suite to the bedside, we will continue to be more a part of the problem than a part of the solution.
 
In the next few issues we will be exploring how leadership in local hospitals are approaching sustainability in healthcare and the programs and initiatives they’ve implemented to attain their green goals.
 
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