Hawai'i-Pacific Chapter of ACHE
A quarterly e-newsletter for the Hawai'i-Pacific Chapter of ACHE Fall 2021
In This Issue
Messages from Chapter Leadership
Message from the Regent
Message from the Chapter President
Article of Interest
Diversity Disparities
Tackling Important Conversations Virtually
The Impact of Remote Work on Reading Body Language
News & Committee Updates
News from the Education Committee
Membership Report: New Fellows, Members, and Recertified Fellows
Diversity Committee: Chapter Demographics
Member Spotlight: Laura Bonilla
ACHE National News
Connect With Your Peers
Our Exclusive On-Demand Content Library Can Help Advance Your Career
Healthcare Consultants Forum Member Directory: Connecting Executives to Consultants
ACHE Blog and Podcasts
2021 Premier Corporate Partners
Calendars and Recent Events
Calendar of Events
Calendar of Educational Events
ACHE Resources
Career Corner
Board of Governors Exam at Pearson VUE Testing Centers
Access Complimentary Resources for the Board of Governors Exam
Disclaimers/Sponsors
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)
Thank you to all our Sponsors
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CHAPTER OFFICERS

   

 

REGENT
Micah Ewing, MBA, FACHE
micah.ewing@hawaiipacifichealth.org

PRESIDENT
Andrew Giles, MBA, FACHE
andrew.t.giles@kp.org

PRESIDENT-ELECT
Travis Clegg, MBA, FACHE
travis.clegg@straub.net


IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT

Darlena Chadwick, MSN, MBA, FACHE 
dchadwick@queens.org


CHAIR, GUAM LOCAL COUNCIL
Jayar Calilung

TREASURER
Kenny Morris
kenneth.morris@stryker.com

SECRETARY
Sally Belles
sbelles@queens.org

PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVE
James C. Lin, MD
jclin@hawaiipacifichealth.org

MILITARY REPRESENTATIVE
Com Stephanie Ku
stephanie.s.ku.mil@mail.mil

DIRECTORS

Suzanne Asaro
asarosk@ah.org

Laura Bonilla, BSN, MA, FACHE
laurab@kapiolani.org

Josh Carpenter
josh.carpenter@trane.com

Cheryl Kozai
cheryl.kozai@hphmg.org

Col Michael D. Foutch
michael.d.foutch.mil@mail.mil

Robyn Polinar
robyn.polinar@kapiolani.org

Carolyn Voulgaridis, JD, RN
carolynvoulgaridis@gmail.com


COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Glenn Kawabata | Communications
glenn.kawabata@straub.net

Jessica Niles | Communications
jessica.niles@straub.net

Jackie Kim | Diversity

Eunice Park | Diversity

Kristen Croom | Education
kcroom@queens.org

Jackie Kim | Education

Travis Clegg, MBA, FACHE | Membership
travis.clegg@straub.net

Nash Witten, MD | Membership
witten@hawaii.edu

Travis Clegg, MBA, FACHE | Nominating
travis.clegg@straub.net

Micah Ewing, MBA, FACHE | Sponsorship
micah.ewing@hawaiipacifichealth.org

Aaron Predum | Sponsorship
aaron.predum@hawaiipacifichealth.org


Article of Interest
The Impact of Remote Work on Reading Body Language

Many people are fully aware of how their body language can communicate their feelings and emotions to the outside world, whether intentionally or not. For instance, crossed arms might signal defensiveness or hostility, consistent eye contact can relay a sense of confidence, leaning forward can suggest engagement and interest.

But with the widespread shift to remote work in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of Americans have shifted to remote work, and for many that remote work is likely to remain a feature of employment for the foreseeable future, even as the pandemic subsides. This means, among other things, that common visual cues around body language are more difficult to pick up in the new remote world. There is widespread use of video conferencing tools, but these don’t fully mimic the nuances of in-person body language.

There are many relevant cues that can be picked up through various aspects of digital communications in a manner similar to how body language is read. The ability to read that language is important for creating a positive work environment in remote and hybrid settings.

Something as simple as including a smiling emoji on an email or text can help set a friendly, disarming tone with colleagues and subordinates and change an email requesting a status update of a project from something that could be taken as demanding and impatient to a casual, friendly check-in.

The fact that millions of Americans have shifted to a remote work setting means that it’s more important than ever to be conscious of how communication is received. While working in-person in an office allowed coworkers to rely on body language to communicate more effectively, that becomes more challenging in a remote setting.

Nevertheless, digital body language can help bridge the gap as long as employees understand how to leverage it. It’s another form of communication that companies should be alert to as they help train their employees for success in the new world of work.

—Adapted from "The Impact of Remote Work on Reading Body Language," by HR Daily Advisor, a sibling publication to HealthLeaders, July 19, 2021.

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