Hawaii - Pacific Chapter of ACHE

Winter 2015 Newsletter

Message from your ACHE Regent, Winter 2015

Jen Chahanovich, FACHE

The ACHE and your local Chapter offer many options to help you advance to Fellow including the interactive learning platform and tuition waiver assistance program. 

Aloha,

I wanted to focus the Regent Message this quarter on becoming board certified in healthcare management as an ACHE Fellow (FACHE). The ACHE and your local Chapter offer many options to help you advance to Fellow including the interactive learning platform and tuition waiver assistance program. 

Exam Online Community Offers a Complimentary Interactive Learning Platform:  Members preparing for the Board of Governors Examination can access the Exam Online Community as a complimentary and supplementary resource that can boost their confidence and help them succeed. The interactive platform gives Members the opportunity to learn and glean study tips from others taking the Exam. It also provides an opportunity to discuss Exam topics with experts for better understanding and the option to participate in study groups. Join the Exam Online Community at bogcommunity.ache.org.

Tuition Waiver Assistance Program: To reduce the barriers to ACHE educational programming, ACHE makes available a limited number of tuition waivers to Members and Fellows whose organizations lack the resources to fund their tuition for education programs through the Tuition Waiver Assistance Program. Members and Fellows in career transition also are encouraged to apply. Tuition waivers are based on financial need and are available for the following ACHE education programs:

  • Congress on Healthcare Leadership
  • Cluster Seminars
  • Self-Study Programs
  • Online Education Programs
  • Online Tutorial (Board of Governors Exam preparation)
  • ACHE Board of Governors Exam Review Course

To learn more about these programs visit ache.org or feel free to contact me on my cell or by email. I encourage you to take advantage of these programs.

Happy Holidays to you and your family.

Jen H. Chahanovich, FACHE
Wilcox Memorial Hospital
President & CEO
Office:  (808) 245-1122
Cell:      (808) 524-6644
Jen.chahanovich@wilcoxhealth.org

Message from the Chapter President

Gidget Ruscetta, BSN, MBA, FACHE

I want to thank our Board, our Members and Sponsors for a great year! As I send this final message of my year as your president, I am reminded of our chapters mission, “To advance healthcare management excellence through education and networking services that meet or exceed the  expectations of our members.” This mission was supported by a number of efforts this year.

Aloha Hawai’i Pacific Chapter Members,

What an amazing year we’ve had!

I want to thank our board, our members and sponsors for a great year! As I send this final message of my year as your president, I am reminded of our chapter's mission, “To advance healthcare management excellence through education and networking services that meet or exceed the  expectations of our members.” This mission was supported by a number of efforts this year:

  1. Growth of our chapter membership by 45 individuals
  2. Increase in members who advanced to Fellow -9 individuals
  3. Meet and Greet session – 43 members
  4. New member orientation for 15 individuals
  5. Over 22 hours in educational, face to face credit opportunities for our members


The last quarter of 2015 was filled with exceptional educational opportunities for chapter members of which many attended.

In October, the chapter hosted Carson Dye for the first chapter-supported education session for 2 days providing 12 face-to-face credits. We had 34 members take advantage of this opportunity. The educational program was focused on leadership strategies and was made possible by our committed sponsors. Along with the education session, we sponsored an added bonus of a 1.5 credit face-to-face diversity panel discussion moderated by Dr. Kathleen Kozak.  

We partnered with the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) in November for a 2-day conference: “Leadership in Action.” This is a new relationship that afforded our chapter members the opportunity to secure 8-10 ACHE Qualified Credits. The chapter's commitment to lifelong learning continues with the upcoming sponsorship of a panel at the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) 2016 conference, “Go Beyond” – April 21st & 22nd. Refer to ACHE Hawai’i Chapter website for more details.
 
We continue to have a need for volunteers for our committees—communications, sponsorship, membership, diversity and education. As you ring in the new year, this is a perfect time to get involved in our chapter. Your input and voice are important to helping shape the future of our chapter. Please join and share your innovative ideas!
 
Thanks to all of you for your continued support and participation in our chapter. I look to supporting Art Gladstone, CEO of Straub Hospital & Clinic and Pali Momi Medical Center, our incoming 2016 Chapter President and the board in my role as Immediate Past President.

Again, it has been a pleasure serving as the 2015 President and I look forward to continue to support and assist our chapter any way I can.
 
Gidget

Recent Chapter Events

Micah Ewing

The Hawaii Pacific Chapter of ACHE held an educational conference located at the Queen's Conferencing Center on October 7 and 8.  

Practical Leadership Strategies in an Age of Change, October 7-8, 2015

The Hawaii Pacific Chapter of ACHE held an educational conference located at the Queen's Conferencing Center on October 7 and 8. The program was entitled "Practical Leadership Strategies in an Age of Change" and presented by Carson Dye, CEO of Exceptional Leadership, author of nine books, executive recruiter, and former health systems leader with over 42 years of total experience.   

Carson spoke on the rapid changes occurring in the healthcare workplace today and focused on providing strategies for dealing with a changing workforce and provided suggestions on transformational leadership that can enhance quality and outcomes. Mr. Dye is a dynamic speaker and fully engaged the audience with practical examples and tools for leading change. The interactive format of the educational sessions provided attending ACHE members with 12 face to face educational credits towards their credentialing goals.   



Carson Dye works interactively on a group breakout discussion

There were over 35 individuals in attendance at the event, taking advantage of the highly discounted rate of the conference. The overall feedback was very positive and we look forward to working to provide you a similar opportunity in 2016! 


Diversity Panel Discussion Event, October 7, 2015

The Diversity Panel Discussion at the end of the first day of the educational conference was an example of a free networking and educational event offered to the entire chapter. This opportunity provided a bonus for 1.5 face to face credits and a great opportunity to network and participate on a leadership issue deserving attention in today's landscape: Diversity. Kathleen Kozak,M.D., Radio Host and Internal Medicine Physician served as moderator and directed the discussion and provided comedy relief after a long day of learning. Heavy Pupus were provided.


Kathleen Kozak, M.D. moderating the Diversity Panel



Panelists (Left to Right):  Jim Cannon, consultant and Diane Paloma, Director of Native Hawiian Program, Queen's

Panel members consisted of Diane Paloma and Diane is Director of Native Hawaiian Health Program for The Queen's Health Systems. Jim Cannon is very active in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender (GLBT) issues and served as a previous hospital CEO and currently consults in operations, strategy, and marketing for hospitals. The panel discussion focused special attention to Hawaiian diversity issues as well as GLBT diversity in healthcare and efforts to promote awareness and diversity at the leadership level.  
 

 

AONE Conference, 2015: Leadership in Action

Micah Ewing
For the first time, the Hawai'i-Pacific Chapter of ACHE and the Hawai'i Chapter of the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) partnered together on the 2015 AONE Leadership Conference..

For the first time, the Hawai'i-Pacific Chapter of ACHE and the Hawai'i Chapter of the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) partnered together on the 2015 AONE Leadership Conference entitled, "Leadership in Action."  This year's conference was held at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel in the Monarch ballroom. Members of both organizations benefited from the networking opportunity, education, picturesque ocean view, and excellent lunch entrees. While AONE members received up to 11.5 contact hours, ACHE members received 8.0 qualified education credits for a very low price. 

  
Members of AONE and ACHE in record attendance network in the expansive
Royal Hawaiian ballroom
 

A star-studded keynote speaker cast with deep credentials and experience spoke on a variety of educational topics germane to the complex issues that compose the 2015 healthcare landscape:

  • Karren Kowalski, PhD, RN, FAAN spoke on lessons and experiences in Vietnam
  • Cole Edmonson, DNP, RN, FACHE spoke on Extreme Leadership and lessons learned from an Ebola outbreak at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital
  • Karen T. Waxman, RN, CNL, CENP, CHSE spoke on integrating health care simulation into your educational strategy to enhance patient safety
  • Gladys Campbell, RN, MSN, FAAN spoke about finding and using your voice and your involvement in the legislative process
  • Patricia McFarland, MS, RN, FAAN spoke on finding common ground and strategies for leading change
  • Patricia Cochrell, RN, MBA, NE-BC spoke about cultivating future leaders
  • Capt. Rosanne Hartley, RN, BSN, MBA spoke on using delayed gratification to motivate people.
  • Julie Kennedy, DNP, BSN, RN presented on inter-professional partnerships and their importance

The success of the conference and the natural synergy of the partnership will be another method in which valuable and high quality learning and networking experiences can be brought into the Pacific Island region.  We look forward to the opportunity of partnering with AONE on this opportunity in 2016. 


Patti Boeckmann, COO, Straub and President, Hawai'i AONE kicks off the conference 

 

News from the Education Committee

MAJ Clint Cobb

The Hawai'i Pacific Chapter's Education Committee worked tirelessly to coordinate an educational event for members requiring Face-to-Face credits for Fellow status.

The Hawai'i Pacific Chapter's Education Committee worked tirelessly to coordinate an educational event for members requiring Face-to-Face credits for Fellow status. This was the first event of its kind here on island and was sponsored by the Hawai'i Pacific Chapter and our sponsors.  The event took place 7-8 Oct 15. This two-day, on-site location training was worth 12 Face-to-Face credits. 32 local chapter members took part in this event.  Our guest facilitator, Mr. Carson Dye, presented a two-day session titled "Practical Leadership Strategies in an Age of Change." 



Carson Dye engaging with students in a group breakout discussion


He spoke of the rapid
changes occurring in the healthcare workplace today and provided attendees with practical tools they could use immediately within their organizations. The program covered strategies for dealing with a changing workforce and provided suggestions on transformational leadership to enhance quality and outcomes.  We hope this type of event becomes an annual opportunity for our members on island.

 

The Hawai'i Pacific Chapter's Education Committee also coordinated a co-sponsored event with the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE). This event, titled "Leadership in Action," took place on 5-6 Nov 15.  ACHE members received 10 Qualified Education Credits for attending this two-day session. Leadership experts, both locally and from across the nation, gathered to share their thoughts on this important topic. Thirty local chapter members attended this event.

 

Our next big educational event is scheduled for April 2016. It will be a co-sponsored event with the Hawai'i Chapter of Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA). The 2016 conference is focused on how three main target groups -- hospitals, physicians, and payers -- must continue to work more closely together to meet the challenges of providing high quality, cost-effective healthcare. Our chapter will coordinate for education credits and help organize a Leadership panel for this event.  More details to follow.

 

The Education Committee is looking for energetic, detailed individuals to help coordinate events for 2016. If you are interested in becoming an active member in the chapter and want to know more about how you can help, please let me know.

 

Regards,

 

Clint Cobb

Chair, Education Committee

Hawaii Pacific Chapter

American College of Healthcare Executives

 

Membership: New Fellows, Members, and Recertified Fellows

Nick Hughey, RN, MBA

Our efforts in recruiting and providing educational programs toward credentialing are making a difference. We are continuing to have great membership growth through our fourth quarter.  

Our efforts in recruiting and providing educational programs toward credentialing are making a difference. We are continuing to have great membership growth through our fourth quarter. The Membership Committee will be establishing a study group for members preparing for the Board of Governors Exam. We will host an information kick-off meeting in the near future. Please be on the lookout for information.
 

I am available to present if you or your organization ever wants information on ACHE and benefits of membership. If individuals are interested, I can certainly make time to follow up and discuss and provide information as well.

 

Our efforts in recruiting and providing educational programs toward credentialing are making a difference. In the 4th quarter, our membership growth continues to follow the same trend, with 11 new members, 3 new Fellows, and 4 recertified Fellows. 

 

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW FELLOWS!

October

     Michael W. Weimann, FACHE, Honolulu

November

     Hui-I Chen, FACHE, Honolulu   

December 
       
     Lt. Col Sarah E. Cuciti, FACHE, Honolulu


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW MEMBERS!


October
 

     Daniel Clark, Tutuhan
 
     Yingying Ezell, Honolulu
     Danelle Fischer, Yigo 
     Gary Goldberg, MD, Kamuela 
     Diane Hale, Kahuku
     CDR Laura McMullen, Tamuning
     CDR Thomas Olivero, Mangilao
     Jason Pauls, RN, Ewa Beach
     Sarah Suzuki, Waipahu

November

    
     Eliza C. Hagen, MD, Honolulu
     CDR Tammy Servies, MD, Kailua


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR RECERTIFIED FELLOWS!


November


     Maj Brian T. Freidline, FACHE, Honolulu
     Cathy F. Meyer-Uyehara, FACHE, Kamuela
     Susan R. Murray, FACHE, Honolulu
     Joanne Reid, FACHE, Kailua 
 
         

 

Calendar of Events for Winter 2015

Tamara Pappas

The Winter 2015 Calendar of Events for ACHE, Hawaii Chapter.


November 2015 November      
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  11/02/15 (Mon) Austin Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 11/03/15 (Tue) Austin Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 11/04/15 (Wed) Austin Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 11/05/15 (Thur) Austin Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 11/05/15 (Thur) AONE Education Event ACHE Education 
29 30           11/06/15 (Fri) AONE Education Event ACHE Education 
                     11/11/15 (Wed) Veterans Day Holiday
11/26/15 (Thur) Thanksgiving Holiday
December 2015 December              
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  12/07/15 (Mon) Hanukkah Holiday
    1 2 3 4 5 12/14/15 (Mon) Orlando Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12/15/15 (Tue) Orlando Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12/16/15 (Wed) Orlando Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 12/17/15 (Thur) Orlando Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education
27 28 29 30 31     12/25/15 (Fri) Christmas Holiday
             
January 2016 January      
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  1/1/16 (Fri) New Year's Day Holiday
          1 2 1/18/16 (Mon) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Holiday
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1/18 - 1/21 St. Petersburg Cluster ACHE Education
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1/25 - 1/28 Beaver Creek Cluster ACHE Education
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31                  
February 2016 February              
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  2/15 (Mon) President's Day Holiday
  1 2 3 4 5 6 2/15 - 2/18 Phoenix Cluster ACHE Educaton
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29          
             


Education Calendar for Winter 2015

Tamara Pappas

Winter 2015 Education Calendar. Take advantage of numerous educational opportunities!

EVENTS THIS QUARTER:

Chapter education events, webinars, and cluster events! Use this calendar to plan out your educational and credentialing opportunities. Cluster events are highlighted in blue and chapter education events in red.  

Click on events for more details.

 

November 2015 November      
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  11/2 - 11/4 Leadership Development  Special Program
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Program
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 11/2 - 11/5 Austin Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 11/11/15 (Wed) Veterans Day Holiday
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 11/26/15 (Thur) Thanksgiving Holiday
29 30          
                    
December 2015 December              
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  12/1/15 (Tue) Meeting the Retail Healthcare  Webinar
    1 2 3 4 5 Imperative
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12/3 - 12/4 COO Seminar (2 Day) Special Program
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12/07/15 (Mon) Hanukkah Holiday
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 12/14 - 12/17 Orlando Cluster (4 Day) ACHE Education
27 28 29 30 31     12/25/15 (Fri) Christmas Holiday
             
January 2016 January      
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  1/1/16 (Fri) New Year's Day Holiday
          1 2 1/13 - 2/24 Exceptional Leadership Online Seminar
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1/18/16 (Mon) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Holiday
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 1/18 - 1/21 St. Petersburg Cluster ACHE Education
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 1/20 - 3/2 Physician Alignment and  Online Seminar
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Engagement: Dos and Taboos
31                   1/25 - 1/28 Beaver Creek Cluster ACHE Education
February 2016 February              
Su  Tu  Th  Sa  2/15 (Mon) President's Day Holiday
  1 2 3 4 5 6 2/15 - 2/18 Phoenix Cluster ACHE Education
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 2/17 - 3/30 A Review of Health Law Online Seminar
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29          
             

Winter 2015 Financial Report

Selma Yamamoto

 

We are ending the fourth quarter of 2015 with strong financial performance. The Hawaii Pacific Chapter has a current balance of $56,338.48 and the Guam account has a balance of $374 as of 12/9/15. 
 

National News - Winter 2015

Micah Ewing

The Winter 2015 National News from ACHE.org. 

Save the Date for the 2016 Congress on Healthcare Leadership
ACHE’s Congress on Healthcare Leadership brings you the best in professional development, exceptional opportunities to network with and learn from peers, and the latest information to enhance your career and address your organization’s challenges in innovative ways. The 2016 Congress on Healthcare Leadership, “Leading Well,” will be held March 14–17 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.

More than 4,000 healthcare leaders attended the 2015 Congress on Healthcare Leadership. Join us in 2016 and be part of the dynamic, energizing event that draws the top healthcare leaders from across the nation and around the world.

This premier healthcare leadership event provides:

• Education on current and emerging issues
• More than 140 sessions of practical learning from healthcare’s top leaders
• Opportunities to connect with your peers
• Career-enhancement workshops

The opening date for Congress 2016 registration and to reserve hotel accommodations was Nov. 11, 2015.

Apply for a Tuition Waiver
To reduce the ACHE educational programming barriers for ACHE members experiencing economic hardship, ACHE has established the Tuition Waiver Assistance Program.

ACHE makes a limited number of tuition waivers available to Members and Fellows whose organizations lack the resources to fund their tuition for education programs. Members and Fellows in career transition also are encouraged to apply. Tuition waivers are based on financial need and are available for the following ACHE education programs:

• Congress on Healthcare Leadership
• Cluster Seminars
• Self-Study Programs
• Online Education Programs
• ACHE Board of Governors Exam Review Course

All requests are due no less than eight weeks before the program date, with the exception of ACHE self-study courses—see quarterly application deadlines on the FAQ page of the tuition waiver application. Incomplete applications and applications received after the deadline will not be considered. Recipients will be notified of the waiver review panel's decision not less than six weeks before the program date. For ACHE self-study courses, applicants will be notified three weeks after the quarterly application deadline.

If you have questions about the program, please contact Teri Somrak, associate director, Division of Professional Development, at (312) 424-9354 or tsomrak@ache.org. For more information, visit ache.org/TuitionWaiver.


Call for Innovations
ACHE would like to invite authors to submit abstracts of their posters for consideration for the 32nd Annual Management Innovations Poster Session to be held at ACHE’s Annual Congress on Healthcare Leadership. We are interested in innovations around challenges your organization has faced, such as in the areas of improving quality or efficiency, improving patient or physician satisfaction, implementation of electronic medical records and optimizing the use of new technology. All accepted applicants will be expected to be available to discuss their posters on March 14 between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m.; posters will remain on display from March 14–16, 2016, at Congress.

Please go to ache.org/CongressPosterSession for the full selection criteria. Abstracts should be submitted as an email attachment to PosterSessions@ache.org by Jan. 19, 2016.


Access Complimentary Resources for the Board of Governors Exam
For Members starting on the journey to attain board certification and the FACHE® credential, ACHE offers complimentary resources to help them succeed so they can be formally recognized for their competency, professionalism, ethical decision making and commitment to lifelong learning. These resources, which include the Exam Online Community, the Board of Governors Examination in Healthcare Management Reference Manual and quarterly Advancement Information webinars, are designed to be supplements to other available Board of Governors Exam study resources, such as the Board of Governors Review Course and Online Tutorial.

• The Exam Online Community is an interactive platform to learn and glean study tips from other Members taking the Exam. Participants can discuss Exam topics with experts and have the option to participate in study groups. Interested Members may join the Exam Online Community at bogcommunity.ache.org.
• The Reference Manual, found at ache.org/FACHE, includes a practice 230-question exam and answer key, a list of recommended readings, test-taker comments and study tips.
• Fellow Advancement Information webinars provide a general overview of the Fellow advancement process, including information about the Board of Governors Exam, and allow participants to ask questions about the advancement process. An upcoming session is scheduled for Dec. 10. Register online at ache.org/FACHE.


We Encourage You to Apply for Fellow Status
The importance of earning the distinction of board certification as a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives cannot be overstated. Advancing your career by achieving Fellow status benefits your professional goals and the healthcare management profession as it demonstrates a healthcare leader’s competence, leadership skills and commitment to excellence in the field. The minimum requirements to submit a Fellow application include: ACHE membership; a master’s or other advanced degree; a healthcare management position with a minimum of two years healthcare management experience; three references from current Fellows (one of which must be a structured interview); and a copy of the Member’s current job description, organizational chart and resume. Upon submitting the application, applicants have three years to complete the remaining requirements for advancement to Fellow. 

Fellow applicants who successfully meet all requirements by Dec. 31, 2015, including passing the Board of Governors Examination, will be eligible to participate in the 2016 Convocation Ceremony at the 2016 Congress on Healthcare Leadership.

Direct your members to ache.org/FACHE to review all requirements and to apply.

ACHE Announces Nominating Committee 2016 Slate
The ACHE Nominating Committee has agreed on a slate to be presented to the Council of Regents on March 12, 2016, at the Council of Regents meeting in Chicago. All nominees have been notified and have agreed to serve if elected. All terms begin at the close of the Council meeting on March 12. The 2016 slate is as follows.

Nominating Committee Member, District 1 (two-year term ending in 2018)
Stephen M. Merz, FACHE
Vice President and Executive Director, Behavioral Health
Yale-New Haven Hospital
New Haven, Conn.

Nominating Committee Member, District 4 (two-year term ending in 2018)
Ed Hamilton, FACHE
System Director, Strategy Development
INTEGRIS Health
Oklahoma City

Nominating Committee Member, District 5 (two-year term ending in 2018)
Kim A. King, FACHE
Founder and President
Strategy Advantage
Manhattan Beach, Calif.

Governor (three-year term ending in 2019)
John Botsko Jr., FACHE
Owner and President
BrightStar Care
Bonita Springs, Fla.

Governor (three-year term ending in 2019)
Michael J. Fosina, FACHE
President
NewYork-Presbyterian/Lawrence Hospital
Bronxville, N.Y.

Governor (three-year term ending in 2019)
Carrie Owen Plietz, FACHE
CEO
Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento
Sacramento, Calif.

Governor (three-year term ending in 2019)
David L. Schreiner, FACHE
CEO
Katherine Shaw Bethea Hospital
Dixon, Ill.

Chairman-Elect
Charles D. Stokes, FACHE
COO
Memorial Hermann Health System
Houston

Additional nominations for members of the Nominating Committee may be made from the floor at the annual Council of Regents meeting. Additional nominations for the offices of Chairman-Elect and Governor may be made in the following manner: Any Fellow may be nominated by written petition of at least 15 members of the Council of Regents. Petitions must be received in the ACHE headquarters office (American College of Healthcare Executives, 1 N. Franklin St., Ste. 1700, Chicago, IL 60606-3529) at least 60 days prior to the annual meeting of the Council of Regents. Regents shall be notified in writing of nominations at least 30 days prior to the annual meeting of the Council of Regents.

Thanks to the members of the Nominating Committee for their contributions in this important assignment:

Diana L. Smalley, FACHE
Cheray T. Burnett, FACHE
Christine M. Candio, RN, FACHE
Brian C. Doheny, FACHE
John M. Haupert, FACHE
Ted W. Hirsch, FACHE
Fred B. Hood, FACHE
CAPT Anne M. Swap, FACHE

ACHE Call for Nominations for the 2017 Slate
ACHE’s 2016–2017 Nominating Committee is calling for applications for service beginning in 2017. All members are encouraged to participate in the nominating process. ACHE Fellows are eligible for any of the Governor and Chairman-Elect vacancies and are eligible for the Nominating Committee vacancies within their district. Open positions on the slate include:

• Nominating Committee Member, District 2 (two-year term ending in 2019)
• Nominating Committee Member, District 3 (two-year term ending in 2019)
• Nominating Committee Member, District 6 (two-year term ending in 2019)
• 4 Governors (three-year terms ending in 2020)
• Chairman-Elect

Please refer to the following district designations for the open positions:

• District 2: District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia
• District 3: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin
• District 6: Air Force, Army, Navy, Veterans Affairs

Candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor should submit an application to serve that includes a copy of their resume and up to 10 letters of support. Per the approval of the Governors Review Task Force Final Report by the Governors in November, the application to serve will be updated online by Jan. 1 2016. For details, please review the Candidate Guidelines, including guidance from the Board of Governors to the Nominating Committee regarding the personal competencies of Chairman-Elect and Governor candidates and the composition of the Board of Governors.

Candidates for the Nominating Committee should only submit a letter of self-nomination and a copy of their resume.

Applications to serve and self-nominations must be submitted electronically to jnolan@ache.org and must be received by July 15, 2016. All correspondence should be addressed to Christine M. Candio, RN, FACHE, chairman, Nominating Committee, c/o Julie Nolan, American College of Healthcare Executives, 1 N. Franklin St., Ste. 1700, Chicago, IL 60606-3529.

The first meeting of ACHE’s 2016–2017 Nominating Committee will be held on Tuesday, March 15, 2016, during the Congress on Healthcare Leadership in Chicago. The committee will be in open session at 2:45 p.m. During the meeting an orientation session will be conducted for potential candidates, giving them the opportunity to ask questions regarding the nominating process. Immediately following the orientation, an open forum will be provided for ACHE members to present and discuss their views of ACHE leadership needs.

Following the July 15 submission deadline, the committee will meet to determine which candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor will be interviewed. All candidates will be notified in writing of the committee’s decision by Sept. 30, 2016, and candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor will be interviewed in person on Oct. 27, 2016.

To review the Candidate Guidelines, visit http://www.ache.org/newclub/ElectedLeadersArea/REGSERV/candguid.cfm.
If you have any questions, please contact Julie Nolan at (312) 424-9367 or jnolan@ache.org.

News from Guam ACHE

LCDR Joseph M. Fromknecht
We are looking for nominees for next year's board members.

Hafa Adai! We are looking for nominees for next year's board members. Please send nominations to Joe Fromknecht at Joseph.M.Fromknecht.mil@navy.mil. Nominations are for President, President elect, Treasurer and Secretary. We will look to hold voting after the first of the year. Thank you!

Very Respectfully,

LCDR Joseph M. Fromknecht
DH, Human Resources
671-344-9499

Joint Commission Accreditation Process Updates for 2016

Richard Giardina RN, MPH, CIC, FACHE

Even if it is not your survey year, we all should be aware of what the Joint Commission (TJC) expects from our facilities during their visit. Annually, expert consultants from Joint Commission Resources travel to Hawai‘i to provide the latest revisions to the Hospital Accreditation Standards (HAC) and anecdotes from surveys to help have a successful survey at our facilities. Here are the major points discussed during the TJC session for 2016:

Even if it is not your survey year, we all should be aware of what the Joint Commission (TJC) expects from our facilities during their visit.  Annually, expert consultants from Joint Commission Resources travel to Hawai‘i to provide the latest revisions to the Hospital Accreditation Standards (HAC) and anecdotes from surveys to help have a successful survey at our facilities.  Here are the major points discussed during the TJC session for 2016:

  1. Revised agenda for the Life Safety surveyor:  This used to be the Life Safety Surveyor (LSS) role was played by the Nurse or Physician Surveyor.  The LSS is now part of the survey team for all days during the survey.  TJC now employs engineers to fulfill that role; in fact, this new role is the most dynamic of all three.  Immediately upon arrival and skipping the opening conference altogether, the LSS will hit the ground running and proceed directly to the Operating Suite to review temperature, humidity, and pressure gradients.  The reason being that infractions of these standards should be addressed and remedied immediately rather than waiting for day 4 of the survey as in the past.

  2. Revised criticality:  TJC uses icons in its Hospital Accreditation Standard manual to denote criticality; meaning, how ‘close’ does the finding come to patient.  Currently a standard is scored as an ‘A’ or ‘C’ (there is no ‘B’) determining how many times an issue has to be addressed before it triggers an RFI. After careful review, TJC is developing a grid looking at probability of harm and how often an event is observed in a facility.  This revised criticality scheme remains in development at this time.  The good news is the icons will disappear from the manual.

  3. Electronic survey findings and interpretation:  There can be a certain level of variability and subjectivity in surveyor standard interpretation.  Particularly when placing a finding into a certain standard.  TJC has developed an electronic database that is driven by keywords in the observation.  The intent is to have agreement between the surveyor findings during survey and the final report that arrives from TJC headquarters post survey, boosting confidence in the consistency of the accreditation process.

  4. 2016 National Patient Safety Goals:  The purpose of the National Patient Safety Goals is to improve patient safety.  The goals focus on problems in health care safety and how to solve them.  The major change for 2016 is, NPSG.06.01.01, use alarms safely, make improvements to ensure that alarms on medical equipment are heard and responded to on time.  Clinical alarm systems are intended to alert caregivers of potential patient problems, but if they are not properly managed, they can compromise patient safety.  This is a multifaceted problem.  In some situations, individual alarm signals are difficult to detect.  At the same time, many patient care areas have numerous alarm signals and the resulting noise and displayed information tends to desensitize staff and cause them to miss or ignore alarm signals or even disable them.  Other issues associated with effective clinical alarm system management include too many devices with alarms, default settings that are not at an actionable level, and alarm limits that are too narrow.  These issues vary greatly among hospitals and even within different units in a single hospital.  There is general agreement that this is an important safety issue.  Universal solutions have yet to be identified, but it is important for a hospital to understand its own situation and to develop a systematic, coordinated approach to clinical alarm system management.  Standardization contributes to safe alarm system management, but it is recognized that solutions may have to be customized for specific clinical units, groups of patients, or individual patients.  This NPSG focuses on managing clinical alarm systems that have the most direct relationship to patient safety.  Starting January 2016, hospitals must implement their plan for reducing alarm fatigue that was required to be completed in 2015.  This can be a daunting task since hospitals are plagued with multiple alarms for a number of medical devices.


In summary, Life Safety is the primary focus of surveys in 2016.  In 2015, 8 of the top 10 findings fell under the category of Life Safety.  Your Life Safety Team at your hospital can benefit by using valuable resources on the Joint Commission Connect website at http://www.jointcommission.org/ to develop a gap analysis and action plan to address potential risks in the Life Safety domain.

Leveraging Electronic Health Records to Promote Population Health

Emiline Buhler

In response to the 2010 Affordable Care Act, financial reimbursement for clinical intervention is increasingly shifting from volume (how many patients were treated) to value (how was the quality of care provided).  In order for healthcare systems to thrive under this model, administrators must identify new strategies to improve population health by preventing and managing chronic diseases outside of the hospital setting.

In response to the 2010 Affordable Care Act, financial reimbursement for clinical intervention is increasingly shifting from volume (how many patients were treated) to value (how was the quality of care provided).  In order for healthcare systems to thrive under this model, administrators must identify new strategies to improve population health by preventing and managing chronic diseases outside of the hospital setting.  These forms upstream interventions are shown to several long-term clinical benefits, including decreased levels of chronic disease and an increased number of quality-adjusted life years (Eddington et al, 2012).

This clinical approach also has several financial implications. Intuitively, if diseases are prevented (or disease progression is mitigated), there are fewer hospitalizations within a community, and fewer medical costs incurred.  However, it is very difficult to generate the necessary return-on-investment analyses needed to support these interventions (de Bruin et al, 2011).  There are several barriers to this form of economic evaluation.  First, it is difficult to delineate cost savings for disease prevention; it is difficult to measure a health event that has not occurred.  It is much more common to see cost-savings associated with chronic disease management programs, because it is easier to define a comparison group: individuals who have the same chronic disease and are receiving standard care.  A recent study of the Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS)- Dorenfest survey predicted that 20% compliance with disease management programs for the nation’s top 5 chronic diseases would amount to more than $40 billion in net savings (Hillestad et al, 2015). 

However, there are limitations to these disease management program assessments as well.  Traditionally, the effectiveness of disease management programs is based on short-term clinical outcomes and cost-savings.  These programs have not been in-place long enough to track disease progression throughout a lifetime, nor is there the proper documentation infrastructure to monitor patients across multiple health platforms (e.g., Skilled Nursing Facilities, Rehabilitation Centers, etc).   Accordingly, establishing a universal Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a pivotal step in generating the longitudinal data necessary to track patient outcomes throughout the continuum of care and support population health management efforts.

Currently, it is possible to track an individual’s demographics and medical history throughout the same health care network.  For example, healthcare collaboratives that include both primary and acute care can monitor patients’ inpatient stays, emergency room encounters, and outpatient visits over time (assuming all care is received within the network).  Analyzing this type of data can give information key information about: 1) whether interventions that occur in the primary care settings truly mitigate disease progression over time, 2) whether these interventions incurred cost savings and/or 3) what social and demographic factors impact disease progression and healthcare utilization.

There are some efforts to promote this form of data exchange state-wide and nationally (e.g.: Hawai‘i Health Information Exchange and Meaningful Use, respectively); however, there are very few published studies that leverage this data.  Long term, healthcare executives should continue support EHR standardization efforts to promote population health management.  This emphasis on EHR standardization and data exchange across multiple care setting can lead to an abundance of quality and safety outcomes, including: predictive modeling algorithms to identify patients in need of services, physician reminders to promote preventative measures, and higher coordination of transitional care between acute care and home health facilities (Hillestad et al, 2015).  In the interim, we need to increase efforts to assess—and disseminate-- the longitudinal data presently available.  This effort will not only maximize the effectiveness of the upstream interventions already in place, but it will set publication precedence for future studies as longitudinal data collection readily available.

References
de Bruin, S. R., Heijink, R., Lemmens, L. C., Struijs, J. N., & Baan, C. A. (2011). Impact of disease
management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review of the literature. Health Policy, 101(2), 105-121.

Egginton, J. S., Ridgeway, J. L., Shah, N. D., Balasubramaniam, S., Emmanuel, J. R., Prokop, L. J., ... &
Murad, M. H. (2012). Care management for Type 2 diabetes in the United States: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC health services research, 12(1), 72.

Hillestad, R., Bigelow, J., Bower, A., Girosi, F., Meili, R., Scoville, R., & Taylor, R. (2005). Can
electronic medical record systems transform health care? Potential health benefits, savings, and costs. Health Affairs, 24(5), 1103-1117.

Humanitarian Medicine and the Lesson of Sustainability

Stefan Fedusiv, RN

Humanitarian medicine is one of the most challenging, rewarding, and enlightening experiences a medical professional can have.

Whenever I share stories about participating in humanitarian medical missions, most people react with interest and usually express their own desires to do “something like that.” Humanitarian medicine is one of the most challenging, rewarding, and enlightening experiences a medical professional can have.  We all work in health care presumably, because we want to use our knowledge, skills, and talents to improve the quality of life for everyone.  There is something exciting about traveling to faraway places and practicing medicine without the comforts of home.  Humanitarian medicine was not exactly what I expected at first.  Of course I was challenged physically and emotionally; however, I was also challenged in ways I had never imagined.  Ways which will forever change the way I look at medicine and its practice.  I learned things about myself and my values which altered the way I look at the world and my place in it.  This rich and rewarding experience also deepened my understanding and appreciation for the concept of sustainability in healthcare.


I am not talking about doing without such comforts as impressive hospital lobbies, or climate controlled environments, or convenient parking.  Instead, how about dealing with the ethical dilemma of standing in front of the world’s largest floating hospital, owned by the richest and most powerful country on the planet, and telling the mother of a sick child we are unable to help?  Or what about learning of the 22 year old female at our facility in need of a below the knee amputation, who wants to have the amputation, but cannot because she does not have the authority in her culture to make such a decision?  What if you are handing out free eyeglasses and sunglasses after a hurricane devastated an area, believing you are helping, only to learn your “generosity” adversely affected the business of local optometrists who were trying to get their businesses back up and running?  You have to ask yourself ,“Who am I helping?  Am I doing this for the patients or am I doing this for myself?”


Aside from the introspection and overall feeling of fulfillment and accomplishment following such experiences, I returned from my experience in Fiji and Papua New Guinea with a completely new perspective on how I view healthcare in this country as well as the way we practice.  One of the most important lessons is the concept of sustainability.  No matter what the project is or how noble the cause, if a project is unsustainable its benefit will be temporary and fleeting.  Humanitarian missions provide only temporary relief if they cannot be sustained.  We realized this when we were in Fiji for only two weeks.  We had the capability to perform complex surgical procedures; however, we had to avoid those procedures because the recovery and rehabilitation exceeded the capability of the host nation and we were not going to be there long enough to provide adequate, necessary care post-operatively.  The same goes with healthcare in the United States.  After all, if hospitals are unsustainable, there will be no health care.


Opportunities for sustainability include cost containment, energy and resource conservation, and waste management.  When you have to walk to your venue while physically carrying all the supplies you plan to use, you become very sensitive to resource conservation.  When there is no running water and you can only wash your hands with the hand sanitizer you have in your own pocket, you realize how difficult it must be for the local community to perform basic hand hygiene.  Handwashing is among the most basic aspects of community health promotion and disease prevention, yet how can this behavior be sustained when there is little to no available soap or running water?  These are very real issues of sustainability on the most basic level.  While these are the more extreme examples, its importance cannot be overlooked.


Healthcare costs in the United States are the highest in the world and continue to rise at an unsustainable rate. As leaders, we are all seeking out ways to bend this cost curve.  This total cost is comprised of a myriad number of contributing factors so it is imperative that each and every program is effective and sustainable for as long as necessary.  Humanitarian medicine is a fantastic way to contribute to the common good, and the benefits of those experiences travel in both directions.  We give of ourselves to help those in need. In return, we develop a better understanding of ways to improve our own healthcare system.  No matter what project or initiative you are working on or starting, regardless of how important or noble, make sure the plan is sustainable.  In doing so, not only will you ensure the success of the project, you will be contributing to the sustainability of our entire healthcare system.  To me, that is very humanitarian.

Career Development

Richard Giardina, RN, MPH, CIC, FACHE
We are happy to provide a link to the new Career Edge link to the ACHE career development resources. We hope that you will find this helpful in the development of your career at any level. 

With the daily grind and the frenetic environment of healthcare, it is very easy to overlook a very important aspect in our lives: our careers. Time and time again, successful leaders achieve their career goals with well thought out and planned career paths.   

It is a focused initiative at ACHE to focus this year on the career development of our members and great effort has been spent to provide resources to help in this area. As a result, in each newsletter we will include a career-development related article, with links to career-related resources. Our goal is to provide you with information and resources to assist you in the planning and development of your career path. 

There are 3 primary resources we would like to present you with:

  1. Introducing CareerEDGE™  (available as a complimentary benefit to ACHE members). 'CareerEdge' is a resource available to assist in this planning process. Check it out!
  2. The ACHE Job Center is a database of employment opportunities and positions in healthcare.
  3. The Career Resource Center.

If you have any questions, please contact one of the board members or send an email to our chapter email account: hawaii@achemail.net

Mahalo.

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