July 2018
In This Issue
From the Desk of the KAHCE President
Message from Your ACHE Regent - Spring 2018
Sponsorship Highlight - KaMMCO
Sponsored Students Reflect on ACHE 2018 Congress
Student/Early Careerist Spotlight
Advancing in ACHE - Part 2
4 Steps to Establishing Your Leadership Philosophy
Enhance Your Decision-Making Skills: 3 Tips
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Officers
President
Judy Corzine, FACHE
Stormont Vail Health
Topeka, KS


President Elect

Tony Thompson, FACHE
Allen County Regional Hospital
Iola, KS


Past President
Roger Masse, FACHE
Ellsworth County Medical Center
Ellsworth, KS


Treasurer

George M. Stover, FACHE
Hospital District #1 of Rice County
Lyons, KS

 

KHA Liaison
Ronald W. Marshall
Kansas Hospital Association
Topeka, KS


ACHE Regent
Patricia Sanders-Hall
High Road Coaching
Overland Park, KS

 

KAHCE Website
www.kahce.org
 


KAHCE LinkedIn
KAHCE Kansas Association of Health Care Executives

 

KAHCE Title Sponsors:

 



Enhance Your Decision-Making Skills: 3 Tips

Good decision making requires a sense of prediction—how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes—and a sense of judgment—how desirable each of those outcomes is—according to a Harvard Business Review article by Walter Frick.  

Highlighted below are three ways to improve your ability to predict the effects of your choices and assess their desirability.

1. Avoid overconfidence. Consider the fact that you may be more confident about each step of your decision-making process than you ought to be, and that’s OK. If you embrace being less certain, however you may be more likely to revisit the logic of your decision and prepare for dramatically different outcomes than your expected one.


2. Analyze how frequently predicted outcomes occur. Numerous studies demonstrate that the best starting point for predictions is to ask “How often does that typically happen?” Get away from the specifics of your particular decision or individual case, and look at the base rate and outcomes of similar cases first.


3. Learn about probability. Research suggests basic training in probability makes people more effective forecasters and helps them avoid certain cognitive biases. Brushing up on probability theory may help you better express uncertainty and think numerically about the question “How often does this usually happen?”


“Great decision makers don’t follow these rules only when facing a particularly difficult choice; they return to them all the time,” Frick writes. “They recognize that even seemingly easy decisions can be hard—and that they probably know less than they think.”

—Adapted from “3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making,” by Walter Frick, Harvard Business Review, Jan. 22, 2018.


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