September 30, 2021
In This Issue
From the Desk of the KAHCE President
Message from Your ACHE Regent - Summer 2021
Membership Report: Celebrate our New Members
FACHE Requirements Have Eased
The Impact of Remote Work on Reading Body Language
Tackling Important Conversations Virtually
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Officers
President:
Trenton Stringer
HCA Healthcare
Overland Park, KS


President Elect:
Todd Willert, FACHE
Community Healthcare System
Onaga, KS


Past President:
Judy Corzine, FACHE
Stormont Vail Health
Topeka, KS


Secretary:
Brady Hoffman
Stormont Vail Health
Topeka, KS


Treasurer:
George M. Stover
Hospital District #1 of Rice County
Lyons, KS


Treasurer Elect:
Tracy O'Rourke, FACHE
Stormont Vail Health
Topeka, KS


KHA Liaison:
Ronald W. Marshall
Kansas Hospital Association
Topeka, KS


ACHE Regent:
Richard W. (Wes) Hoyt, LTC (Ret), FACHE
Hutchinson, KS


KAHCE Website
www.kahce.org  


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KAHCE Kansas Association of Health Care Executives

 

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The Impact of Remote Work on Reading Body Language
Many people are fully aware of how their body language can communicate their feelings and emotions to the outside world, whether intentionally or not. For instance, crossed arms might signal defensiveness or hostility, consistent eye contact can relay a sense of confidence, leaning forward can suggest engagement and interest.

But with the widespread shift to remote work in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of Americans have shifted to remote work, and for many that remote work is likely to remain a feature of employment for the foreseeable future, even as the pandemic subsides. This means, among other things, that common visual cues around body language are more difficult to pick up in the new remote world. There is widespread use of video conferencing tools, but these don’t fully mimic the nuances of in-person body language.

There are many relevant cues that can be picked up through various aspects of digital communications in a manner similar to how body language is read. The ability to read that language is important for creating a positive work environment in remote and hybrid settings.

Something as simple as including a smiling emoji on an email or text can help set a friendly, disarming tone with colleagues and subordinates and change an email requesting a status update of a project from something that could be taken as demanding and impatient to a casual, friendly check-in.

The fact that millions of Americans have shifted to a remote work setting means that it’s more important than ever to be conscious of how communication is received. While working in-person in an office allowed coworkers to rely on body language to communicate more effectively, that becomes more challenging in a remote setting.

Nevertheless, digital body language can help bridge the gap as long as employees understand how to leverage it. It’s another form of communication that companies should be alert to as they help train their employees for success in the new world of work.

—Adapted from "The Impact of Remote Work on Reading Body Language," by HR Daily Advisor, a sibling publication to HealthLeaders, July 19, 2021.


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