American College of Healthcare Executives - New Jersey

April 2017

President's Message

SERVING OUR MEMBERSHIP WELL

Dear ACHENJ Member,

I am pleased to report how ACHENJ has prepared for innovation in how to serve our membership well in 2017 and beyond.

The Chapter held a Strategic Planning Retreat in October 2016, assisted by Gerard J. Berish, CAE, ACHE Regional Director for Districts 1 and 5, and mapped out our approach. We are on a “Journey to a Chapter of Excellence” as measured by national standards of Member Satisfaction, Education and Networking, Net Membership Growth, and Advancement of Eligible members.

Dear ACHENJ Member,

I am pleased to report how ACHENJ has prepared for innovation in how to serve our membership well in 2017 and beyond. We continue committed to a profession now more than ever experiencing a transformation as it responds to a demand for high reliability in patient safety and equity of care.

The Chapter held a Strategic Planning Retreat in October 2016, assisted by Gerard J. Berish, CAE, ACHE Regional Director for Districts 1 and 5, and mapped out our approach to how to best  prepare the chapter to serve our members as they face the new imperatives: we are on a “Journey to a Chapter of Excellence” as measured by national standards of Member Satisfaction, Education and Networking, Net Membership Growth, and Advancement of Eligible members.

T
he Chapter’s Multi-Year Plan is guided by member priorities and performance metrics.  In February, the Membership Committee, under the leadership of Maria Miranda, reviewed the member priorities as identified in the national survey (Fall 2016) and sponsored a Chapter survey to identify member preferences. The response was as follows:

Member priorities as identified in National survey

Member preferences as identified in Chapter survey

1.    Face-to-Face and Qualified education

Educational programs: Strategic Planning, Population Health, Patient/Customer Satisfaction and Engagement, Financial/General, Quality/Patient Safety


2.     Advancement to Fellow

Assistance with education requirements, letters of recommendation


3.    Career Development  

Of those who responded, C-Suite leaders would consider participating on a panel discussion regarding career development and mentorship

4.    Networking

Location of programs: Top 4 counties where members prefer events: Essex, Morris, Bergen and Middlesex


To this end, the Board, Committee Chairs and Committee members have committed to enter into collaboration with other organizations that will contribute to our focus on the key member priorities and preferences.

The Education Committee, under the leadership of Alex Puma, has established a new relationship with New Jersey Hospital Association (NJHA), and we now have 116 CEUs booked: 22.5 Face-to-Face education hours (including an On-Location Program that is not yet advertised) and 93.5 qualified credits. Members are invited to access the educational programs by visiting the ACHENJ or NJHA websites.

The Membership and Education Committees are also working on a new podcast which will be added to the ACHENJ website to further increase access to educational programs. Here is a membership call to action:
1) Are you interested in serving as a Podcast speaker?
2) What would you expect from the Podcast? Take the poll! 

Our chapter continues to grow and diversify. Our roster includes 892 members (January 2017) of which 189 (21%) are board certified as Fellows and 178 are eligible to advance. We serve ACHE members from Sussex to Ocean counties; 15% of our members are early careerists, 43% are mid-level, and 42% are senior level. 55% of our members work in hospitals, 16% in the health industry, 13% are consultants, and 16% other.

As my term as President concludes in May, my thanks to so many who have contributed to the success of the Chapter this year; to outgoing leaders Jodi McCaffrey, FACHE, secretary; and Anne Donohue, Sponsorship Chair; Scott Serbin, Immediate Past President; and Nancy DiLiegro, PhD, FACHE, regent; to the leaders assuming new roles on the Board and especially to Jeff Egnatovich, Chapter President as of June 1, and Michael McDonough, new Regent for the District. 

A very special thanks also to Stephen Zieniewicz, FACHE, president & CEO of Saint Barnabas Medical Center, for his support during this past year. I have enjoyed serving in the role of Chapter President and pledge to continue supporting the Chapter on its Journey to Excellence. 

I hope to see you at the annual meeting on June 1, 2017 at J&J World Headquarters, New Brunswick.

Céu Cirne-Neves, CPHQ, FACHE
ACHENJ President 2016-2017

   








 






Message from Your ACHE Regent

Message from Your ACHE Regent

With the spring season upon us, I hope this Regent update finds you well.

Congratulations to Michael J. McDonough, FACHE elected as the new Regent. His term begins at the close of the Council of Regents meeting in Chicago on March 25, 2017.

The ACHE Regent Breakfast and Awards Program was held on January 20, 2017 at the Princeton Hyatt. Fellow colleagues from the New Jersey health care industry joined the event. Christine C. Winn, FACHE, the ACHE Governor for District 1, was the guest speaker. 

 

With the spring season upon us, I hope this Regent update finds you well.


Congratulations to Michael J. McDonough, FACHE elected as the new Regent. His term begins at the close of the Council of Regents meeting in Chicago on March 25, 2017.

The ACHE Regent Breakfast and Awards Program was held on January 20, 2017 at the Princeton Hyatt. Fellow colleagues from the New Jersey health care industry joined the event. Christine C. Winn, FACHE, the ACHE Governor for District 1, was the guest speaker. 

The Regent Awards was presented at the breakfast on January 20, 2017. Please join me in congratulating the recipients:

  • Paula A. Gutierrez –  Early Careerist
  • Philip J. Driscoll Jr., FACHE – Senior Careerist
  • Anne Donoghue, Johnson and Johnson – Business Partner
  • Elizabeth A. Ryan – Lifetime

On October 24, 2016 the ACHE-NJ Board conducted a Strategic Planning Retreat represented by board members, committee chairs and committee members. Gerard J. Berish, CAE, ACHE Regional Director for Districts 1 and 5, participated in the ACHE-NJ Retreat.

The ACHE Fall District Meeting and Chapter Leaders Conference was scheduled in September in Chicago. Nationally, all but two chapters were represented. The findings and recommendations of the Credentialing Task Force were presented and discussed.

The 2017-2019 Strategic Plan was one of the topics of the ACHE Leadership. The ACHE Board of Governors will review feedback from the Regents and address at the November 2016, ACHE Board of Governors meeting.  

Thank you for your support and participation in the American College of Healthcare Executives.

Nancy DiLiegro, PhD, FACHE
ACHE Regent for New Jersey - Northern

ACHENJ Mission & Vision

Mission & Vision

MISSION

 

The mission of ACHENJ is to be the professional membership society for healthcare executives; to meet its member’s professional, educational and leadership needs’ to promote high ethical standards and conduct; to advance healthcare leadership and management excellence; and to promote the mission of ACHE.

 

VISION

ACHENJ will serve as the primary professional resource dedicated to the growth and development of New Jersey’s healthcare leaders.

MISSION

 

The mission of ACHENJ is to be the professional membership society for healthcare executives; to meet its members' professional, educational and leadership needs; to promote high ethical standards and conduct; to advance healthcare leadership and management excellence; and to promote the mission of ACHE.

 

VISION

To be a premier ACHE Chapter dedicated to the growth and development of New Jersey healthcare leaders.

Leader to Leader Point Recipients

Leader to Leader Point Recipients

Leader-to-Leader Point Recipients:


ACHENJ would like to thank the below listed chapter members for their commitment to the Chapter, and to ACHE, in recommending membership to ACHE.

Leader-to-Leader Point Recipients:


ACHENJ would like to thank the below listed chapter members for their commitment to the Chapter, and to ACHE, in recommending membership to ACHE.

Ceu Cirne-Neves, FACHE
Inger J. Donohue
Mark J. Gallagher, FACHE
James R. Gonzalez, FACHE
Margaret Greenaway Chaplin, FACHE
Brad A. Haspel
Catherine Holmgren
Suzanne Ianni
Daniel B. Kline, FACHE
Maria C. Miranda, FACHE
Kevin J. Slavin

New Chapter Members

New Chapter Members

On behalf of the ACHENJ Board and our Chapter, I would like to welcome all of our new members, who are listed below. I would like to extend a special thank you to our Membership Committee for all of their hard work and dedication to the chapter.

On behalf of the ACHENJ Board and Chapter Leadership, we welcome our new members, listed below: 

Amy Doran
Corazon Dumalagan
Betsy A. Greenleaf
Daniel Hillman
Joseph Mannion
Felix Rajan
Lauren Stabinsky
Heather A. Veltre
Karen S. Ali
Martha Baisch
Andrew Crespo
John Dougherty
Susan J. Garrubbo
Paula Golding
Anurag Gupta
Serena Hou
Samantha Kelly
Paul B. Matey
Krishna Patel
Nick Piergallini
Theresa Soroko
Kristi Tutela-Dane
Patricia A. Balsamini
Lois V. Greene
Sam Hessami
Scott Matin
Andrea Murray
Divya Padgaonkar
Aashish R. Patel
Nivi Pillai
Bruce D. Shafer

Chapter News

Chapter News

  • Consider Volunteering
  • Corporate Sponsorship
  • "Wishes Come True"

Consider Volunteering with ACHENJ:

Please consider yourself asked to volunteer with ACHENJ. We continue to promote volunteering opportunities and encourage members in good standing to reach out to a Chapter Officer or Committee  Chair/co-chair with any questions; be prepared to let us know in what way your time and talent will contribute to bringing our Chapter to the next level:

Corporate Sponsorship:

If you would like to explore obtaining corporate sponsorship opportunities with ACHENJ, please contact: Anne Donoghue, ACHENJ’s corporate sponsorship chair, at ADonoghu@its.jnj.com

Wishes Come True:

We encourage all of our members to contribute to our Wishes Come True Program, which grants wishes (e.g. adaptive technology and software, specialized physical therapy tools) to children with special needs. To make a donation, or to further develop our Wishes Program, please contact First-Member-at Large, Paula A. Gutierrez at pg5386@gmail.com.

ACHE members interested in serving on a Chapter Committee are welcome by expressing their interest and in what way they plan to contribute. Please contact Ceu Cirne-Neves, FACHE, president (ceu.cirne-neves@rwjbh.org); or Jeffrey P. Egnatovich, president-elect (jeff@egnatovich.com).

The Chapter’s Committees are:
•    Education and Events Committee 
•    Diversity Committee
•    Member Services Committee
•    Communications Committee
•    Corporate Sponsorship Committee
•    Distinguished Services Award Committee
•    Scholarship Committee
•    Wishes Come True Committee
•    Strategic Planning Committee 

 


 

Spotlight: Communications Committee

Spotlight: Communications Committee

The Communications Committee is responsible for supporting chapter communications and oversees development and maintenance of the website, quarterly chapter newsletter, social media, public relations, and related activities. The co-chairs are members of the Board of Directors. Responsibilities include:

The Communications Committee is responsible for supporting chapter communications and oversees development and maintenance of the website, quarterly chapter newsletter, social media, public relations, and related activities. The co-chairs are members of the Board of Directors. Responsibilities include:

•    Website: Oversee the development and updates/revisions to the chapter website.

•    Newsletter: Establish guidelines for acceptable content, creation of original content, acquisition and review of content (text and photographs) from members and external sources, editing, and creative/layout/design recommendations.

•    Social Media: Establish and maintain the chapter’s visibility on social media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn).

•    Public Relations: Support public relations activities and internal/external communication (in coordination with the Executive Committee) on behalf of the chapter.

The Communications Committee recently realigned each tri-chair’s responsibilities to better serve our membership:

Ann Tuason is responsible for keeping the chapter website (http://ahenj.achechapter.org/) up to date. Harshal Shah develops our email communications and adds all of our events to EventBrite to streamline the online registration process. Lastly, the chapter’s social media channels are now handled by Michael Pizzano. Be sure to follow our pages: Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/ACHENJ/), LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/groups/3051811) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/ACHENJ) to view photos from events and read chapter news.

Additionally, the committee is developing a plan to better promote events and communicate news. If you have any input you’d like to share about this process, please contact Jodi McCaffrey, secretary, at jodi.mccaffrey@emcare.com

Spotlight: Member Services Committee

Spotlight: Member Services Committee


The Member Services Committee is responsible for all activities related to understanding the needs of the members.  The Co-Chairs are members of the Board of Directors. Responsibilities may include creating, conducting and analyzing the annual membership survey for presentation to the board, creating and maintaining a new member outreach program, updating the member value statement and coordinating outreach to all subsections of members in conjunction with other committees. The committee’s workplan includes membership growth and assistance with Advancement to Fellow.

The Member Services Committee is responsible for all activities related to understanding the needs of the members.  The Co-Chairs are members of the Board of Directors. Responsibilities may include creating, conducting and analyzing the annual membership survey for presentation to the board, creating and maintaining a new member outreach program, updating the member value statement and coordinating outreach to all subsections of members in conjunction with other committees. The committee’s workplan includes membership growth and assistance with Advancement to Fellow.


Maria C. Miranda, FACHE / co-chair
Jane M. Liss / co-chair  
Arthur Pann
Johnny Rodriguez
Deborah Brown  
Shawn Ekwall

Susan Garrubbo

Lida Lebron

Jennifer Mendrzycki

 

National News

National News
 
New Websites for the Journal of Healthcare Management and Frontiers
 
ACHE’s publishing division, Health Administration Press, has recently partnered with Wolters Kluwer, a global leader in professional information services and the publisher of more than 300 health-related journals. The partnership will expand digital distribution of ACHE’s journals to academic libraries and healthcare institutions, as well as implement best-in-class journal practices that will enhance search capabilities and online discoverability through Wolters Kluwer’s Ovid database platform.
 
New websites for the Journal of Healthcare Management and Frontiers of Health Services Management were launched in January and include a more robust catalog of archived content. The full run of back issues for Frontiers is currently available, and the complete archive for JHM will be developed throughout 2017. Previously, the digital editions for both journals were only available from 2006 to present day.
 
Digital conversion of the full run of both journals will not only extend the content available to ACHE members, it will also preserve important historical resources and perspectives for the field of healthcare administration as a whole.
 
As an added benefit of the partnership, ACHE members now will have digital access to both JHM and Frontiers. Previously, digital access had been limited to one journal of the member’s choice. Members who currently receive a print copy of a journal will continue to do so under the new partnership.
 
Members may visit the new journal websites at ache.org/Journals. You will be prompted to log in with your ACHE credentials. Choose the journal you want to view, and you will be redirected to the new sites. The new sites feature a responsive design and are easily viewed on mobile devices.
 
Healthcare Executive magazine will continue to be available in the current digital format at ache.org/Publications and in the digital publications app. For more information about the partnership with Wolters Kluwer, your online access, or your print subscription, please contact HAP at hapbooks@ache.org
 
 
ACHE, IFD Alliance to Expand Healthcare Internships for Diverse Individuals
 
ACHE and the American Hospital Association’s Institute for Diversity in Health Management have entered into a strategic collaboration to co-promote the Summer Enrichment Program, which is designed to grow and strengthen the pipeline of healthcare leaders from underrepresented groups. The program places diverse graduate students pursuing advanced degrees in healthcare administration or a related field in 10-week, paid internships at healthcare organizations. As of Oct. 31, 2016, hospitals, health systems and other healthcare organizations interested in hosting an intern from the program in 2017 can register at diversityconnection.org/SEP. IFD staff will work with organizations to match program students with host sites beginning in February. Internships generally will take place from June through August. The program will be administered by IFD and co-promoted by ACHE, primarily through ACHE chapters across the country. 
 
For more information about the program or on becoming a host site, visit diversityconnection.org/SEP or contact Jasmin Clark, membership and educational specialist, IFD, at ifd-sep@aha.org or (312) 422-2658; Terra L. Levin FACHE, CAE, regional director, Division of Regional Services, ACHE, at tlevin@ache.org or (312) 424-9329; or Cie Armstead, director, Diversity and Inclusion, ACHE, at carmstead@ache.org or (312) 424-9306. 
 
 
ACHE Senior Executive Program
 
The ACHE Senior Executive Program prepares senior healthcare leaders for complex environments and new challenges. Past participants have included senior or executive directors, vice presidents, COOs, CNOs and CFOs—many of whom aspire to become a CEO.  
 
The program’s locations and dates are as follows: 
 
  • Chicago (June 5–7)
  • San Diego (Aug. 14–16)
  • Orlando, Fla. (Oct. 30–Nov. 1)
 
Participants must attend all three sessions in each city. Participants grow professionally in a supportive learning environment over the course of three multiday sessions. The Senior Executive Program is tailored for senior leaders, providing them with an opportunity to gain skills in decision making, problem solving and team building. The program features three primary focus areas: “Charting Your Leadership Course,” “Leading the Value-Ready Healthcare Enterprise” and “Guiding Enterprisewide Change.”   
 
Enrollment is limited to 30 healthcare executives. A limited number of scholarships are available for individuals whose organizations lack the resources to fully fund their tuition. For more information, contact Catie L. Russo, program specialist, Division of Professional Development, ACHE, at (312) 424-9362, or visit ache.org/SeniorExecutive.
 
 
ACHE Executive Program

The Executive Program is designed to help mid-level managers in healthcare refine their knowledge, competencies and leadership skills. Participants will have the opportunity to learn, share and grow professionally together over three multiday sessions. 
 
The Executive Program will be held at the following locations and dates: 
 
  • Chicago (June 5–6)
  • San Diego (Aug. 14–16)
  • Orlando, Fla. (Oct. 30–Nov. 1)
 
Participants must attend all three sessions in each city. The Executive Program is tailored for mid-level managers, providing them with an opportunity to assess their skillsets in order to develop stronger leadership capabilities and prepare them for change within their organizations.  The program features three primary focus areas: “Charting Your Leadership Course,” “Preparing for Accountable Care” and “Managing for an Uncertain Future.” 
 
Enrollment is limited to 30 healthcare executives. A limited number of scholarships are available for individuals whose organizations lack the resources to fully fund their tuition. For more information, contact Catie L. Russo, program specialist, Division of Professional Development, ACHE, at (312) 424-9362, or visit ache.org/Executive
 
 
Board of Governors Exam Fee Waiver Campaign: March 1–June 30

The Board of Governors Exam fee waiver promotion allows eligible ACHE Members to save $200 when they submit their Fellow application between March 1 and June 30, 2017. 
 
*Eligible Members must submit their completed Fellow application, $250 application fee and meet all requirements—including the three years of ACHE membership tenure and five years of healthcare management experience—by June 30 to receive approval to take the Board of Governors Exam. Pending application approval, ACHE will waive the $200 Board of Governors Exam fee. 
 
For more information on recent changes to the application process requirements, go to ache.org/FACHE.  
 
 
ACHE’s Leader-to-Leader Program

When you share the value of ACHE membership with your colleagues by encouraging them to join or advance to Fellow status, you can earn points to obtain rewards such as gift certificates toward ACHE education programs, clothing, a travel mug and a fitness tracker. If you sponsor three or more Members who successfully achieve Fellow status, you can even be entered into a raffle for a free registration to ACHE’s Congress on Healthcare Leadership.
 
Each time a person joins ACHE or advances to Fellow status and lists your name as a sponsor on the application, you earn a point. The more points you earn, the more rewards you can receive. Points expire on Dec. 31 of the year after they were earned (e.g., a point earned on Jan. 1, 2017, will expire on Dec. 31, 2018). You can check your point balance in the My ACHE area of ache.org. To ensure colleagues mention your name, referral cards are available for you to pass out so you receive the credit you deserve.
 
When you help grow ACHE, you make a strong statement about your professionalism and leadership in the healthcare field and also strengthen the organization.
 
For more information on the program, go to ache.org/l2l.
 
 
ACHE Member Communities Enhance Membership Experience
 
ACHE’s Asian Healthcare Leaders Forum, Healthcare Consultants Forum, LGBT Forum and Physician Executives Forum, enhance value for ACHE members through a package of benefits tailored to their unique professional development needs. 
 
AHLF helps increase the representation—through leadership and professional development—of Asian-Americans in healthcare executive management, policy and administration. Visit ache.org/AHLForum to learn more.
 
The Healthcare Consultants Forum can help healthcare consultants stay ahead of the curve and more effectively meet client needs through targeted resources. More information is available on ache.org/HCForum, where interested consultant members can join. 
 
The LGBT Forum enhances representation of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender healthcare executives and promotes high-quality care for LGBT individuals and their families. The Forum provides opportunities for personal and professional growth to members in various healthcare settings and at all career stages. To learn more or to join, visit ache.org/LGBTForum.
 
The Physician Executives Forum offers education, networking and relevant information that address the top issues physician executives face, such as leading quality initiatives and enhancing interdisciplinary communication skills. Visit ache.org/PEForum to find out more about the Forum’s benefits and to join. 
 
Benefits of membership in any of the forums include a special designation on ACHE’s online Member Directory, an e-newsletter and the opportunity to participate in an exclusive ACHE LinkedIn Group dedicated to the respective member community.
 
The cost of membership for each forum is $100 per year, in addition to ACHE annual dues.
 
 
ACHE Call for Nominations for Regent-at-Large

The ACHE Board of Governors is calling for applications to serve as Regent-at-Large in Districts 2, 3, 4 and 5 beginning March 2018. ACHE Fellows are eligible for Regent-at-Large vacancies within their district.  
 
  • District 2 consists of the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia.

  •  District 3 consists of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, Minnesota, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin.

  •  District 4 consists of Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas.

  •  District 5 consists of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.
 
The primary purpose of the Regents-at-Large positions is to promote in ACHE governance a more diverse representation relative to race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation. The responsibilities of the Regent-at-Large, including suggested knowledge, skills and experience, are included in the position description posted at ache.org/RegentAtLarge. Appointments will be made by the Board of Governors in November 2017. Candidates should not directly contact members of the Board of Governors to request letters of support.
 
Fellows from Districts 2, 3, 4 and 5 may apply to serve by sending a letter (see specifications below) via U.S. mail postmarked between Jan. 1 and July 15 to Caitlin E. Stine, American College of Healthcare Executives, 1 N. Franklin St., Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606-3529.
 
Materials can also be sent via email to cstine@ache.org or faxed to (312) 424-2836. All candidates will be listed in the Member Center of ache.org under the heading “Regent-at-Large Declared Candidates.” Any candidate not listed by July 31 should contact Caitlin E. Stine immediately. If prospective candidates have any questions about the application process, they should also contact Caitlin E. Stine.
 
Application specifications: To be considered, applications must include:
 
  • A statement, in the form of a letter, by the candidate that addresses his or her qualifications for the position, including the demographic characteristics, knowledge, skills and experience.

  • A professional resume of education and work experience.
 
Candidates may include up to two letters of support for their candidacy. Letters of support may not be solicited from current members of the ACHE Board of Governors.
 
 
ACHE Call for Nominations for the 2018 Slate

ACHE’s 2017–2018 Nominating Committee is calling for applications for service beginning in 2018. All members are encouraged to participate in the nominating process. ACHE Fellows are eligible for any of the Governor and Chairman-Elect vacancies and are eligible for the Nominating Committee vacancies within their district. Open positions on the slate include:
 
  • Nominating Committee Member, District 1 (two-year term ending in 2020)

  • Nominating Committee Member, District 4 (two-year term ending in 2020)

  • Nominating Committee Member, District 5 (two-year term ending in 2020)

  • Four Governors (three-year terms ending in 2021)

  • Chairman-Elect
 
Please refer to the following district designations for the open positions:
 
  • District 1: Canada, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont
  • District 4: Alabama, Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas
  • District 5: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming
 
Candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor should submit an application to serve that includes a copy of their resume and up to 10 letters of support. For details, please review the Candidate Guidelines, including guidance from the Board of Governors to the Nominating Committee regarding the personal competencies of Chairman-Elect and Governor candidates and the composition of the Board of Governors.
 
Candidates for the Nominating Committee should submit only a letter of self-nomination and a copy of their resume.
 
Applications to serve and self-nominations must be submitted electronically to jnolan@ache.org and must be received by July 15. All correspondence should be addressed to Richard D. Cordova, FACHE, chairman, Nominating Committee, c/o Julie Nolan, American College of Healthcare Executives, 1 N. Franklin St., Ste. 1700, Chicago, IL 60606-3529.
 
The first meeting of ACHE’s 2017–2018 Nominating Committee will be held March 28, during the Congress on Healthcare Leadership in Chicago. The committee will be in open session at 2:45 p.m. During the meeting, an orientation session will be conducted for potential candidates, giving them the opportunity to ask questions regarding the nominating process. Immediately following the orientation, an open forum will be provided for ACHE members to present and discuss their views of ACHE leadership needs.
 
Following the July 15 submission deadline, the committee will meet to determine which candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor will be interviewed. All candidates will be notified in writing of the committee’s decision by Sept. 30, and candidates for Chairman-Elect and Governor will be interviewed in person on Oct. 26.
 
To review the Candidate Guidelines, visit ache.org/CandidateGuidelines. If you have any questions, please contact Julie Nolan at (312) 424-9367 or jnolan@ache.org.
 
 
2017 Premier Corporate Partners

The American College of Healthcare Executives is proud to recognize and thank our 2017 Premier Corporate Partners. ACHE’s Premier Corporate Partners play an important role in providing funding that helps ACHE develop new programming initiatives, career resources, enhanced networking opportunities, and additional educational lectures at our Clusters, to name just a few. By partnering with ACHE, these companies are clearly demonstrating their commitment to your career development and the importance of continuing education in an era of transformative change.
 
 
 
Fund for Healthcare Leadership Thanks Supporters

On behalf of the Fund for Healthcare Leadership, we thank all our generous supporters for their commitment to ACHE’s mission to advance our members and healthcare management excellence. Over 680 outstanding individuals helped the Fund for Healthcare Leadership provide another year of scholarships for ACHE’s Senior Executive and Executive programs, as well as another cohort of the Thomas C. Dolan Executive Diversity Program. ACHE looks forward to more opportunities for outreach for the Fund in 2017, and hopes that our distinguished donors will again consider us in their charitable giving plans this year. 
 

Career Resources

Career Resources

  • CareerEDGE
  • ACHE Career Resource Center
  • ACHE Job Center
  • ACHENJ Job Board

Don’t Forget to Visit ACHE’s CareerEDGE

 

 

In the rapidly changing healthcare field, a career plan is more important than ever. If you’re not proactively managing your career, finding success and reaching your goals may be a challenge.

To help you navigate this evolving marketplace, ACHE is pleased to bring you a unique, interactive and comprehensive tool for planning and managing your career—CareerEDGE, available as a complimentary benefit to ACHE members.

CareerEDGE features:


  • A personalized online Career Dashboard featuring career management tools, job board links, news items and other career resources
  • Access to several free assessments including a 360° Working Style tool, a modified versions of Meyer’s Briggs Type Indicator and  ACHE’s Healthcare Leadership Competencies Assessment Tool
  • An innovative career planning framework to guide your thinking about career success today and in the future and help you build a solid career plan document
  • A process to help you make the connection between clarifying goals, identifying the competencies required for success, identifying valuable resources and assessing the level of progress toward developing critical skill sets.

 

CareerEDGE is an easy-to-navigate, one-stop source for the full array of resources needed for a strategic approach to career management at any career level. Log in today to give yourself an edge in the healthcare job market! Visit ache.org/CareerEdge.

Find out more by visiting CareerEDGE today!  Start Your Career Plan Here

 

ACHE Career Resource Center

ACHE Job Center

ACHENJ Job Board


 

Ray E. Brown Management Resource Center

Ray E. Brown Management Resource Center

The Ray E. Brown Fund was established in 1971 to recognize ACHE's former Chairman, Gold Medal recipient and founder of the Congress on Healthcare Leadership. Originally used to fund a collection of general management books, in 2005 the board approved use of the proceeds to support the Ray E. Brown Management Resource Center. The Ray E. Brown Management Resource Center is divided into four sections.

The Ray E. Brown Fund was established in 1971 to recognize ACHE's former Chairman, Gold Medal recipient and founder of the Congress on Healthcare Leadership. Originally used to fund a collection of general management books, in 2005 the board approved use of the proceeds to support the Ray E. Brown Management Resource Center. The Ray E. Brown Management Resource Center is divided into four sections.

  • Strategies for Excellence
  • Databases, Statistical Resources and Research
  • Non-ACHE Periodicals, Newsletters and Reports
  • Association, Foundation and Agency Links

For more information

ACHE Diversity Tool

ACHE Diversity Tool

Did you know that ACHE has a great Diversity Tool for healthcare leaders?

Did you know that ACHE has a great Diversity Tool for healthcare leaders?

This tool can be located in the ACHE Diversity Resources section of the website. Information on the tool, including a link, is listed below:

The Diversity and Cultural Proficiency Assessment Tool for Leaders PDF) was created by ACHE, the American Hospital Association, the Institute for Diversity in Health Management and the National Center for Healthcare Leadership. It contains assessment worksheets and case studies that healthcare leaders may use to evaluate the diversity and cultural proficiency of their organizations and identify what activities and practices need to be implemented.

Here is a link to a great article from Kelly Services titled “Understanding and Leveraging Generational Diversity for Organizational Success”

 

ACHE Diversity Resources

 

 

Articles of Interest

The No. 1 Secret To Career Success

The No. 1 Secret To Career Success

Bruce Kasanoff ,   CONTRIBUTOR MAY 20, 2016

 

Let's get right to your answer: The secret to your success is to remember what you should be doing, and to actually do it. If this sounds insanely obvious, let me ask you: Day after day, even when it gets hard, are you doing the right things?

Most people don't. Most people try to be smarter or better or more clever or more independent than everyone else. For many years, I fell victim to these traps, too.

 

The No. 1 Secret To Career Success

Bruce Kasanoff ,   CONTRIBUTOR MAY 20, 2016

 

Let's get right to your answer: The secret to your success is to remember what you should be doing, and to actually do it. If this sounds insanely obvious, let me ask you: Day after day, even when it gets hard, are you doing the right things?

 

Most people don't. Most people try to be smarter or better or more clever or more independent than everyone else. For many years, I fell victim to these traps, too.

 

I spent a big chunk of my career trying to be at least one of the smartest people in the room. There was a good reason for this: It was my job.

 

Long story short, technology companies love "thought leadership" because it helps them sell tech. So for many years, my job was to deliver "thought leadership" speeches and training programs. But eventually, it dawned on me that by trying to invent my own smarter version of the world, I was acting dumber than pretty much everyone else. It was all just words, all just one person trying to invent the Next Big Thing.

 

One day, I had an epiphany: People don't need the Next Big Thing; they simply need better ways to remember to do the right things.

 

In other words, you know what to do, you just don't do it. This may be because you lack willpower, clarity, or grit.

The challenge, of course, is not simply remembering the solution. The challenge is remembering the solution when you really want to forget it.

 

Simple example: If you want to lose weight... eat less and exercise more. You know this. But can you remember it when you are at a dinner with friends on your second glass of wine and everyone orders dessert?

 

To test my ability to solve this problem, I gave up alcohol for a full year (2016). My experience so far is that my willpower stays strong in the absence of alcohol. (If I was still in the "thought leadership" business, I'd market this as the Alcohol-Free Diet, although no one but me would probably try it.)

 

So remembering to do what's important often involves understanding your weaknesses, strengths, and environment.

 

In the context of an organization -- be it a small team or a public company -- the same problem occurs. Someone has a vision, one that is practical and makes sense. The team adopts it. But two months later, things are getting messy. Four months later, chaos reigns.

 

You can't just say the solution. Identifying it is not nearly enough. You have to remember the solution, day after day.

 

You have to help other people overcome their uniquely human challenges, which largely revolve around the fact that we lack willpower, clarity, or grit. Your organization probably lacks these things too, especially clarity.

 

Instead of giving all your employees a book and saying, "Do this," craft a plan to repeat the same message thousands of times. Yes, thousands. Turn it into pictures. Add it into conversations. Put it on forms and weave it into processes. Hell, make it the name of a sandwich in your cafeteria.

 

Do the same thing at home. Don't buy books to find the Next Big idea. Buy books to help you focus your energy and attention on what you already know you should be doing. Join groups and make friends for the same purpose. Get radical... if your neighborhood encourages too much eating, drinking and lounging around... move. Yes, move.

 

You know the right thing to do. Are you going to do it, or just look for an easier idea that you can pretend is right?

 

 

 



As a Fellow of ACHE, you know the importance of earning the distinction of board certification in healthcare management. Continue to share your passion for professional development and healthcare management excellence with your colleagues!

Your encouragement can make a difference with a person's decision to begin the journey towards a major milestone in the career – earning the prestigious FACHE® credential. And like you, they can be recognized for their competence and dedication to lifelong learning.

Now Is the Perfect Time - Exam Fee Waiver Promotion Offers $200 Savings
There is added incentive for your fellow ACHE colleagues to act now with our Exam Fee waiver promotion that runs March 1 – June 30. The offer entails that when an eligible Member submits a completed Fellow application with the $250 application fee, they will receive a $200 exam fee waiver pending approval of their application.

Direct your colleagues today to ache.org/FACHE where they can learn about credentialing requirements and submit their application.

We thank you for sharing your commitment to advancing healthcare management excellence with your colleagues!


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Through our Leader-to-Leader program, your efforts to strengthen ACHE and the healthcare management community translate to great rewards when existing Members list you on their application and successfully advance to Fellow status. Learn more about this popular member referral program at ache.org/L2L.


Questions? Our Customer Service Center can be reached at (312) 424-9400, contact@ache.org, Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m Central time.

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https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucekasanoff/2016/05/20/the-1-secret-to-career-success/#3edd18707107

How a Good Work Atmosphere Leads to More Success

How a Good Work Atmosphere Leads to More Success

By Jeffrey Fermin February 22, 2017


Here are some of the reasons why having a great office makes your company revenue and your business sustainable.
It's simple: if you have a great workplace, people will perform better and customer service will be better.

Unfortunately it is not the norm, as many companies fail to practice good techniques to engage their employees. But thankfully, there are many ways that a company can change the atmosphere to create a better workplace environment.

How a Good Work Atmosphere Leads to More Success

By Jeffrey Fermin February 22, 2017


Here are some of the reasons why having a great office makes your company revenue and your business sustainable.
It's simple: if you have a great workplace, people will perform better and customer service will be better.

Unfortunately it is not the norm, as many companies fail to practice good techniques to engage their employees. But thankfully, there are many ways that a company can change the atmosphere to create a better workplace environment.

The main focus should be to give the employees a voice and create an office that’s for the people, by the people. Creating or reinventing an office to be employee-centric will lead to more success in the long term, as it’ll increase revenue growth and improve customer satisfaction.

Research has proven that a bad atmosphere can damage a company. Need more convincing? Here are the facts.


How a Bad Atmosphere Affects the Office

A disengaging atmosphere can lead to poor performance from good employees. In the U.S. alone, employee disengagement is costing companies over $500 billion dollars every year, as it affects productivity, wellness and revenue.

Having a bad atmosphere with poor leadership can make a superstar employee feel as if they are not wanted. If management is only looking for what is in their best interest, it negatively affects all the employees, as it ruins their confidence and their care for the workplace. When employees lose interest in their workplace, they become “check-collectors.”

They only show up to work and do enough work to get by and get paid. An engaged employee is looking and thinking about what’s in the best interest of the company and the people around them. It drives them and allows them grow and get better at their job.


How to Create a Good Work Atmosphere

It’s very difficult to be considered a great place to work.

Many companies are looking for that new thing they can do to improve their office. Nowadays, both consumers and job-seekers are looking for companies that do the right thing.

Recent studies conducted by Nielsen, prove that the majority of consumers will be willing to pay extra to have sustainable products from companies that have a good mission and purpose. They also found that the majority of job-seekers prefer to work for a company with good practices, as well. Basically, people of all ages want to buy products that have good core values.

Job-seekers would also work for those same companies that do what they can to make work better for the employee and the world. It correlates; if a company has a good foundation and they are do-gooders down to their core, they are going to attract employees that will follow the lead and be motivated to keep getting better.

If an organization is doing the right thing, they have the ability to boost their customer loyalty and have their employees become enamored by the vision of the company. Creating a good work atmosphere will have to be done organically through the thoughts and inputs of employees.

Sometimes receiving and getting employee feedback may feel taboo, and most people are reluctant to give advice to someone they consider a superior. Fortunately, there have been recent advancements in HR tech that provide managers with data to improve the quality of life at work.

Being that there’s a lot of emphasis being put on things like employee engagement and happiness. Managers are now seeking more data to do right by their employees.

Using platforms that provide employee engagement surveys will help management obtain actionable feedback, and is a step in the right direction that will allow a company to get employees’ opinions and create a great atmosphere.

To sum it up, a company can create a great atmosphere by listening to their employees. It’ll improve the employees as individuals, and the collective improvement will allow them to be engaged employees that will do their best to obtain and retain customers.

 

https://www.business.com/articles/how-a-good-work-atmosphere-leads-to-more-success

9 Habits Of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

9 Habits Of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

By Dr. Travis Bradberry

When emotional intelligence first appeared to the masses, it threw a massive wrench into what many people had always assumed was the sole source of success—IQ.

How much of an impact does emotional intelligence (EQ) have on your personal and professional success? The short answer is: a lot! It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with a tremendous result.

Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions that achieve positive results. Emotional intelligence is made up of four core skills that pair up under two primary competencies: personal competence and social competence.

9 Habits Of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

By Dr. Travis Bradberry

When emotional intelligence first appeared to the masses, it threw a massive wrench into what many people had always assumed was the sole source of success—IQ.

How much of an impact does emotional intelligence (EQ) have on your personal and professional success? The short answer is: a lot! It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with a tremendous result.

Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions that achieve positive results. Emotional intelligence is made up of four core skills that pair up under two primary competencies: personal competence and social competence.

Personal competence comprises your self-awareness and self-management skills, which focus more on you individually than on your interactions with other people. Personal competence is your ability to stay aware of your emotions and manage your behavior and tendencies.
•    Self-Awareness is your ability to accurately perceive your emotions and stay aware of them as they happen.
•    Self-Management is your ability to use awareness of your emotions to stay flexible and positively direct your behavior.

Social competence is made up of your social awareness and relationship management skills; social competence is your ability to understand other people’s moods, behavior, and motives in order to respond effectively and improve the quality of your relationships.
•    Social Awareness is your ability to accurately pick up on emotions in other people and understand what is really going on.
•    Relationship Management is your ability to use awareness of your emotions and the others’ emotions to manage interactions successfully.

Despite the significance of emotional intelligence, its intangible nature makes it very difficult to know which behaviors you should emulate. So I’ve analyzed the data from the million-plus people TalentSmart has tested in order to identify the habits that set high-EQ people apart.

1. They’re relentlessly positive. Keep your eyes on the news for any length of time, and you’ll see that it’s just one endless cycle of war, violent attacks, fragile economies, failing companies, and environmental disasters. It’s easy to think the world is headed downhill fast. And who knows? Maybe it is. But emotionally intelligent people don’t worry about that because they don’t get caught up in things they can’t control. They focus their energy on directing the two things that are completely within their power—their attention and their effort. Numerous studies have shown that optimists are physically and psychologically healthier than pessimists. They also perform better at work. Remind yourself of this the next time a negative train of thought takes hold of you.

2. They have a robust emotional vocabulary. All people experience emotions, but it is a select few who can accurately identify them as they occur, which is problematic because unlabeled emotions often go misunderstood, which leads to irrational choices and counterproductive actions. People with high EQs master their emotions because they understand them, and they use an extensive vocabulary of feelings to do so. While many people might describe themselves as simply feeling “bad,” emotionally intelligent people can pinpoint whether they feel “irritable,” “frustrated,” “downtrodden,” or “anxious.” The more specific your word choice, the better insight you have into exactly how you are feeling, what caused it, and what you should do about it.

3. They’re assertive. People with high EQs balance good manners, empathy, and kindness with the ability to assert themselves and establish boundaries. This tactful combination is ideal for handling conflict. When most people are crossed, they default to passive or aggressive behavior. Emotionally intelligent people remain balanced and assertive by steering themselves away from unfiltered emotional reactions. This enables them to neutralize difficult and toxic people without creating enemies.

4. They’re curious about other people. It doesn’t matter if they’re introverted or extroverted, emotionally intelligent people are curious about everyone around them. This curiosity is the product of empathy, one of the most significant gateways to a high EQ. The more you care about other people and what they’re going through, the more curiosity you’re going to have about them.

5. They forgive, but they don’t forget. Emotionally intelligent people live by the motto “Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me.” They forgive in order to prevent a grudge, but they never forget. The negative emotions that come with holding onto a grudge are actually a stress response. Holding on to that stress can have devastating health consequences, and emotionally intelligent people know to avoid this at all costs. However, offering forgiveness doesn’t mean they’ll give a wrongdoer another chance. Emotionally intelligent people will not be bogged down by mistreatment from others, so they quickly let things go and are assertive in protecting themselves from future harm.

6. They won’t let anyone limit their joy. When your sense of pleasure and satisfaction are derived from comparing yourself to others, you are no longer the master of your own happiness. When emotionally intelligent people feel good about something that they’ve done, they won’t let anyone’s opinions or accomplishments take that away from them. While it’s impossible to turn off your reactions to what others think of you, you don’t have to compare yourself to others, and you can always take people’s opinions with a grain of salt. That way, no matter what other people are thinking or doing, your self-worth comes from within. Regardless of what people think of you at any particular moment, one thing is certain—you’re never as good or bad as they say you are.

7. They make things fun. Emotionally intelligent people know exactly what makes them happy, and they constantly work to bring this happiness into everything they do. They turn monotonous work into games, go the extra mile to make people they care about happy, and take breaks to enjoy the things they love no matter how busy they are. They know that injecting this fun into their lives fights off stress and builds lasting resilience.

8. They are difficult to offend. If you have a firm grasp of whom you are, it’s difficult for someone to say or do something that gets your goat. Emotionally intelligent people are self-confident and open-minded, which creates a pretty thick skin.

9. They squash negative self-talk. A big step in developing emotional intelligence involves stopping negative self-talk in its tracks. The more you ruminate on negative thoughts, the more power you give them. Most of our negative thoughts are just that—thoughts, not facts. You can stop the negative and pessimistic things your inner voice says by writing them down. Once you’ve taken a moment to slow down the negative momentum of your thoughts, you will be more rational and clear-headed in evaluating their veracity. You can bet that your statements aren’t true any time you use words such as “never,” “worst,” and “ever.” If your statements still look like facts once they’re on paper, take them to a friend and see if he or she agrees with you. Then the truth will surely come out.
Bringing It All Together

Unlike your IQ, your EQ is highly malleable. As you train your brain by repeatedly practicing new emotionally intelligent behaviors, your brain builds the pathways needed to make them into habits. Before long, you will begin responding to your surroundings with emotional intelligence without even having to think about it. And as your brain reinforces the use of new behaviors, the connections supporting old, destructive behaviors will die off.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-travis-bradberry/9-habits-of-highly-emotio_b_11595082.html

 

6 Ways to Boost Alignment and Improve Strategy Execution

Developing an efficient and innovative new strategy can be challenging, but not nearly as challenging as aligning people in an organization to successfully execute that strategy, according to a recent Harvard Business Review article. Summarized below are six steps to help your leadership team boost alignment and create focus around the “highest-impact actions that will drive the organization’s most important outcomes.”

1. Define the one most important outcome. Identifying the most important thing your team hopes to accomplish in the next 12 months will help clarify your next steps.

2. Distinguish the most essential people. Your strategy may require a team effort, but it’s also crucial to recognize whose job is most essential to achieving the organization’s goal. Doing so will help focus leaders’ efforts and resources.

3. Have key players pinpoint their primary contribution. Similar to how your team should identify one outcome, your key people should identify their one pivotal strength related to the strategy and their one key contribution. Simplicity is a must when it comes to maintaining momentum.

4. Conduct coaching sessions. Leaders should have “laser-focused, 30-minute one-on-one coaching sessions” to ensure headway is being made and progress is on track.

5. Gather and report data. Coaching sessions give leaders the chance to collect data on trends and organizational obstacles team members are facing. Sharing data with the previously identified key people can help drive priorities forward.

6. Enhance performance. Have the key contributors fill out surveys on how the organization’s key strategy is progressing and whether they feel the 30-minute coaching sessions are valuable or effective. This information can help leaders improve their strategy execution.

—Adapted from “Execution Is a People Problem, Not a Strategy Problem,” by Peter Bregman, Harvard Business Review, Jan. 4, 2017.

The Social Side of Emotional Intelligence: Bad Habits to Avoid

Recent studies show likability can be traced back to a few social skills such as sincerity, transparency and understanding. According to Travis Bradberry, author of the best-selling book Emotional Intelligence 2.0, people with high emotional intelligence often possess such skills. They also tend to avoid the following bad behaviors, which can make you unlikeable:

  • Humble-bragging and self-deprecation
  • Being too serious or unsociable
  • Not asking enough questions during a conversation
  • Emotional instability, e.g., throwing things, screaming, etc.
  • Using your phone while interacting with people
  • Name-dropping to seem important or interesting
  • Gossiping
  • Being close-minded
  • Over-sharing personal information or problems


“When you build your awareness of how your actions are received by other people, you pave the way to becoming more likable,” wrote Bradberry.


—Adapted from “7 Things Wildly Successful People Do Before 7:30 A.M.,” by Travis Bradberry, Forbes.com, Jan. 24, 2017.