January 2017
In This Issue
Message from the President, NNEAHE -Karen Clements, RN,FACHE
Message from Your ACHE Regent- Vermont: Fall 2016
Message from Your ACHE Regent Maine - Fall 2016
National News from ACHE
Career News from ACHE
Article of Interest - Leadership Development
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Board of Directors
President

Kevin Donovan, FACHE

Past - President

Karen Clements, RN, FACHE

President - Elect

J. Tate Curti, FACHE 

Secretary/Treasurer

Dawn LeBaron, FACHE

Members

Patsy Aprile, FACHE 

Chris O'Donnell, FACHE

Michael Peterson, FACHE

Marcy Rushford, FACHE

Marie Vienneau, FACHE

Michael Zemany, FACHE

 

 

 

Article of Interest - Leadership Development

7 Ways Accomplished People Begin Their Morning Routine

Travis Bradberry, author of the best-selling book Emotional Intelligence 2.0, recently published an article on Forbes.com outlining seven early-morning habits people who want to be successful should adopt, summarized below.

1. Drink lemon water. The nutrients in lemon water improve physical and mental energy levels.

2. Exercise. Research has shown exercising can boost a person’s energy as well as their outlook. Positive, energized people tend to get more done.

3. Disconnect from technology. Avoid jumping onto your phone before you even get out of bed. Texts, emails and social media alerts can clutter the mind.

4. Eat a healthy breakfast. There’s a reason breakfast is called the “most important meal of the day.” Eating a healthy breakfast can enhance short-term memory and concentration levels.

5. Be mindful. Many successful leaders begin each day by meditating. The quiet time allows the mind to focus, combat stress and be more creative.

6. Set goals. Setting specific, feasible goals helps leaders remain calm and productive in the face of a hectic workday.

7. Say no. It’s important for leaders to honor their commitments, even if the commitment is to a quiet, work-free morning routine. People who can say “no” to taking on a new commitment that would encroach upon a previous engagement are less likely to overextend themselves.

—Adapted from “7 Things Wildly Successful People Do Before 7:30 A.M.,” by Travis Bradberry, Forbes.com, Oct. 18, 2016.

 

How to Sustain Healthcare Improvement Efforts: 4 Keys to Success

There are few things more frustrating than pouring time and effort into a process improvement just to see those new workflows forgotten and an organization regress to its bad habits. Highlighted below are four tips to help overcome that obstacle.

1. Test new work processes in a pilot unit. Rolling out a new work model tends to be easier when the model has already been tested on a small scale. Having a pilot unit allows management to standardize good habits and ensure the new model is aligned with the organizational goals.

2. Implement improvements on the front line. Engaging frontline clinical staffers who deal with the day-to-day operations of an organization is critical to the success and sustainability of a process improvement. Without the frontline staff, systems frequently revert to their old ways.

3. Celebrate small successes to build morale. Change is difficult and asking for too much too quickly can be demoralizing for any staff. During the early stages of major process change, be prepared to recognize small, short-term achievements that could boost buy-in and momentum.

4. Address staff grievances with improvement efforts. Positive performance reviews and promotions are not the only ways to motivate employees; frontline managers are also more likely to stick with an improvement effort if it eliminates a daily hassle in their own work processes.

—Adapted from “4 Steps to Sustaining Improvement in Health Care” by Kedar S. Mate, MD, and Jeffery Rakover, Harvard Business Review, Nov. 9, 2016.  

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