Quarterly SOHLstice
December 2019
In This Issue
President's Message
SOHL Programs: Quarterly Update
Welcome Our Newest Members of SOHL!
National News | Q4
Shifting Perceptions of Change From Episodic Solution to Always-on Strategy
Learn the Art of Dialogue and Have Open, Productive Conversations
Special Thanks to Our Platinum and Gold Sponsors
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Chapter Officers

Executive Board


Regent (California - Southern)
Ellen Zaman, FACHE
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

 

President
Dasha Dahdouh
Rady Children’s Hospital - San Diego

 

President Elect
Edwin Kofler
UC San Diego School of Medicine

 

Immediate Past President
Darrell Atkin
TruthPoint / Darrell Atkin & Associates


Secretary
Spshelle Rutledge 
National University


Co-Treasurers
Amy Kasahara 
UC San Diego Health

Michael Sokolowski

 

Board of Directors


Membership
Allison Noel
ECG Management Consultants

Aubrianna Butler


Programs
Jared Vogt
Rady Children’s Hospital

Nora Bota
County of San Diego


Marketing
Michelle Martin
Casa Palmera Treatment Center

Melinda Hudson
UC San Diego Health


Career Development
Andrea Gonzalez
Scripps Health


Volunteer Coordinator
Vicki Shumulinsky
West Health


Sponsorship
Barbara Gerber
Devon Hill Associates, LLC

Howard Salmon
nThrive


Imperial County Liaison
Kathleen Lang

 

Subcommittee Members


Diversity Council
Chisun Chun
Rady Children's Hospital

Melody Schiaffino
San Diego State University


Allied Healthcare Professional Council
Jose PonCevega
Naval Medical Center San Diego

Nora Bota
County of San Diego

Shawn Amirhoushmand
Generations Healthcare-Friendship Manor Nursing

Yameeka Jones
Vibra Hospital of San Diego

Sarah Gerard
VA San Diego Healthcare System


Annual Conference
Johan Otter
Scripps Health

Kristine Ortwine


Newsletter
Mike De Castro
ECG Management Consultants


Social Media
Alice Dang
Scripps Health


Mentoring
Sarah Gerard
VA San Diego Healthcare System

 

Executive Program
Celerina Cornett

Jack Hallmark


Advancement Study Group
Jose PonCevega
Naval Medical Center San Diego

Andrea Gonzalez
Scripps Health


Graduate Program Council, San Diego State University
Brandy Lipton

Student Liaison, San Diego State University
Sarah Norwood
Britney Prince


Graduate Program Council, National University
Negin Iranfar

Student Liaison, National University
Norelis Dyshkant
Myreen Piazza


Graduate Program Council, UC San Diego
TBD

Student Liaison, UC San Diego
Justin Sigmund
Rene Lopez

 

College Bowl
Peggy Ranke
National University


Senior Advisors Council
Mary Parra
Neighborhood Healthcare

Mark Campbell
TRICARE Regional Office – West


Members-At-Large
Aaron Byzak
Galvanized Strategies

Nia Price


Website Manager
Carol Cannizzo
BestBuy Health

Learn the Art of Dialogue and Have Open, Productive Conversations

Open and productive conversation is absolutely critical in today’s high-velocity business environment. If our conversations go nowhere, failure will quickly follow.

The problem is that most of us think we are having conversations when we really are not. We often participate in one-way conversations–essentially monologues: I tell you what I want to tell you. You tell me what you want to tell me (or you tell me what you think I want to hear so I’ll leave you alone). We excel at taking turns talking, but neither side is exploring and discovering and building on what is being said. When this happens, the promise of a new discovery or breakthrough is lost. So we aren’t solving problems and are often creating them.

There is a difference between what typically passes for conversation and true dialogue. If two people are engaged in a dialogue, at least one of them can dependably benefit from the other’s experiences. That is why it is important to learn the art of dialogue and practice it daily in all communications. To help promote the art of dialogue, you must be curious about another's point of view and willing to:

• State your own view and ask others for their reactions
• Be wrong
• Accept that you may be unaware of certain facts
• Remain open to new information
• Change your mind
• Interpret how others are thinking and reacting and seek to understand their underlying feelings

Dialogue lets us discover more of our own intelligence and blend it with the knowledge and wisdom of others. Clear and powerful agreements can result from dialogue, whereas little worthwhile insight is likely to come from simultaneous monologues. These types of ineffective conversations can lead to a reactive cycle, in which people react instead of participate. If left unchecked, the reactive cycle can do more than kill the productivity of a conversation and even damage relationships.

A reactive cycle starts when someone says something with which you don’t agree, or may even strongly dislike. In a split second, your emotions are triggered and you may feel threatened or defensive. You react by attempting to control the situation, the person or retaliating. Doing so may trigger the other person's emotions, causing that person to now attempt to gain control, which, in turn, causes you to react again. This back-and-forth emotional interplay—this reactive cycle—results in another unproductive conversation or meeting.

There are three steps that can be taken to break a reactive cycle:
1. Identify it; where one of the parties notices the reactive cycle and literally “calls it out.”
2. One or both of the parties claim their responsibility for being reactive.
3. Both parties try to understand their own–and the other’s–viewpoints and emotions, and attempt to enter into a true dialogue by reframing their perspectives.

After we have named, claimed and re-framed a reactive cycle, we can engage in the type of open, honest and productive discussion needed to accomplish mutual objectives. By learning the art of dialogue we help ensure that everyone is on the same page and moving forward in the same direction.

—Adapted from "Learn the Art of Dialogue and Have Open, Productive Conversations," O'Brien Group.

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