American College of Healthcare Executives
Your Chapter's Quarterly Newsletter Fall 2009
In This Issue

Message from the President
Message from the Regent
Dec. 31 Advancement Deadline for Former Diplomates
2009 New Members, New Fellows, and Recertified Fellows
Annual Dinner Meeting Held November 12, 2009
Summer Meeting/Program Had Distinguished Panel
Summer ePoll Results
ACHE 2009 Chapter Member Needs Survey Results
Make Listening a Key Component of Your Leadership Strategy
Sharing Information Key to Your Companyís Health
Leader to Leader Program
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)


ePoll

Which of the following statements most closely aligns with your thinking about health care reform:

Iím generally in favor, but have some issues with some of the provisions.
Iím generally in favor but there are some real deal breakers I cannot support.
Congress should start over and consider more conserative approaches.
There is nothing wrong with our current system that a little minor tweaking couldnít fix.
The current bills don't reform enough; we need a single payor system.



Links

THEF Website
ACHE Job Bank


Chapter Officers

President

Robert E. Byrd, FACHE
Alamance Regional Medical Center

President-Elect

Christine L. Sternjacob
Novant Health – Triad Region

Secretary-Treasurer

Paul A. Jeffrey
Wesley Long Community Hospital – Moses Cone Health System

Directors

Pamela M. Sinclair, FACHE
High Point Regional Health System

Samuel B. Seifert
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Make Listening a Key Component of Your Leadership Strategy

Successful leaders don’t talk all the time; they pay close and constant attention to the people they want to influence. If you want to do a better job of leading people, start by becoming the kind of leader your staff feel comfortable talking to. Here are some guidelines:

  • Ask good questions. The best questions generate detailed answers and thorough discussions. Instead of telling people what you want them to do, ask them what they think they should do and why. Listen before you speak, and then ask more questions that explore their thinking.
  • Don’t solve problems for people. Your staff will bring you problems and ask you what to do. Resist the impulse to tell them, or to handle the problem yourself. Instead talk about what caused the problem, explore options, and—again—listen to ideas. Even if the solution ultimately comes from your head, people will feel better about putting it to work knowing they had a fair chance to share their opinions.
  •  Pay attention to feelings. You don’t have to be a psychologist to understand and take into account the emotions of your employees. Let people vent when they’re upset. Acknowledge their anger when they feel they’ve been treated unfairly. Smile when they make a joke. You may not agree with their feelings, but you do need to validate them.
  •  Look forward, not back. Always steer your discussions toward the future. Avoid dwelling on past mistakes or last year’s triumphs. Don’t ignore the lessons of experience; instead, take a long-term perspective that motivates people to move forward.

Adapted from Communication Solutions, July 2009, (800) 878-5331.


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Congress on Healthcare Leadership
March 22 - 25, 2010 


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