American College of Healthcare Executives
Spring 2011
In This Issue

President's Message
Message from the Regent
National News - Spring 2011
2012 to 2014 Credentialing Changes
Break Out of a Rut and Move Ahead
Survey Staff to Curb Conflict
The Warning Signs of Career Disaster
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)


Chapter Officers

President

Pamela M. Sinclair, FACHE - Advanced Home Care

President-Elect

Samuel B. Seifert - Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

Secretary- Treasurer

Preston Hammock  - Alamance Regional Medical Center

Directors

Wendy P. Hicks - Forsythe Medical Center, Novant Health 

Johnny Veal - Lexington Memorial Hopsital

Immediate Past President 

Paul A. Jeffrey
Wesley Long Community Hospital – Moses Cone Health System

The Warning Signs of Career Disaster

Many of us have recurring dreams. Mine is that I’m driving down the freeway and can’t read the road signs until I’ve missed an important exit. Fortunately, it’s just a dream. But many people have trouble reading signs—not road signs, but career warning signs.
 
A career warning sign is any change that indicates possible career disaster. While warning signs may vary according to employment situations, there are three basic warning signs to look for.
 
Warning Sign #1: Sales are down in your company. 
While not everyone in an organization is involved with sales, all jobs are affected by sales levels. When revenues decrease, profits are held steady by cutting costs, which often means cutting jobs. Protect yourself by paying attention to your company’s sales.
 
While not all employees are privy to sales numbers, there are ways of finding pertinent financial information. Public companies must publish financial statements. And employees of nonpublic companies can also read the signs of declining sales, like:

•  Work load decline
•  Boss suddenly concerned about small costs, like pens and copy paper
•  Sales manager was fired or sales department reorganized
 
Alert employees are sensitive to such indicators. They keep their resume updated at all times and cultivate a growing professional network for potential future job leads.
 
Warning Sign #2: Management changes.  
Any management change has the potential to damage your corporate position. Be watchful during:
•  Mergers and acquisitions
•  Successive short-term management (e.g., three bosses in two years)
•  Retirement or replacement of senior management
 
Wise employees listen closely to new-management rhetoric. Is he making dramatic promises? Does he have a reputation as a job cutter? The first announcement of new management is the time to prepare your resume and cautiously explore outside options.
 
Warning Sign #3: You’ve lost favor with your boss.  
While “gut feelings” are often the first warning, some objective indicators are:
•  A less-than-exemplary performance review
•  No performance-based salary increase
•  Smaller than expected year-end bonus
•  Your input is not requested at planning meetings
•  Your suggestions are ignored

If you sense your position on the corporate totem pole is falling, trust your gut. When jobs are at stake, yours will be one of the first sacrificed. Prepare your new career plan.
 
These warning signs may seem obvious, but they are often ignored by those who fear change. Rather than take action, they lean on false hope that loyalty to the employer will pay off in the end.
 
Those who practice career management never confuse company loyalty with aversion to change. When career warning signs appear on the horizon, read the signs clearly so that you’re ready for the next exit with a strong resume, career plan, and interview skills.
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Deborah Walker, Certified Career Management Coach
Read more career tips and see sample resumes at:
www.AlphaAdvantage.com
email: Deb@Alphaadvantage.com

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