American College of Healthcare Executives
Fall 2011
In This Issue

President's Message
Message from the Regent
National News - Fall 2011
Choose a Diverse Panel of Teachers
Drive Retention With These 4 Simple Steps
Baby Boomers, Beware! Donít Let Your Resume Date You!
2012 to 2014 Credentialing Changes
Ensure delivery of Chapter E-newsletter (Disclaimer)


Chapter Officers

President

Pamela M. Sinclair, FACHE 
Advanced Home Care

President-Elect

Samuel B. Seifert
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center

Secretary- Treasurer

Preston Hammock 
Alamance Regional Medical Center

Directors

Wendy P. Hicks
Forsythe Medical Center, Novant Health 

Johnny Veal
Lexington Memorial Hopsital

Immediate Past President 

Paul A. Jeffrey
Wesley Long Community Hospital – Moses Cone Health System

Baby Boomers, Beware! Donít Let Your Resume Date You!
Deborah Walker, Certified Career Management Coach

If you’re a job seeker of the Baby Boom generation, you may be feeling a little left out by the job market. You’re certainly not ready to retire, but the young recruiters you send resumes to don’t seem to respond to your skills and experience. If you’re feeling symptoms of age discrimination, you should know that your resume could be the culprit, categorizing you as out of date and over the hill.
 
There are three ways your resume can put you in the over the hill category. Your resume is due for an update if it contains:
 
1.      Outdated technology skills
 
2.      Outdated industry or occupational terminology
 
3.      Outdated resume trends
 
Don’t despair if your resume is out of date. You can perform an extreme resume makeover by using the tips below.
 
1.      Make sure you are up to date on your industry’s technology.
 
Check multiple job descriptions within your industry to see what technologies employers really want. Determine which technologies are missing from your resume. Then decide what you need to learn or do in order to fill that technology gap. Consider adult education classes, college classes, or even online learning.
 
You should be aware that technology terms are often used as keywords to filter the best resumes from electronic databases. If your resume doesn’t have them, it may never be seen. Make sure your technology skills aren’t leaving you behind.
 
2.      Make sure your resume is using current terminology.
 
If you have just been adding to the same old resume over the years, then your early entries may be using outdated terms. One way to bring your resume up to date is through publications from your industry’s professional associations. If you don’t belong to any professional associations, you might be missing out on the latest industry-speak.
 
Another good resource is job descriptions. Search job descriptions in your field for recurring terms. Learn to use the current terminology for your industry correctly and effectively.
 
3. Make sure your resume reflects today’s trends in resume format and style.
 
Ten or 15 years ago, the old-fashioned reverse-chronological format may have worked for you. But now that you have more experience, it may not be the best choice. The more advanced hybrid format may be much better at promoting your skills and expertise, providing you with a more professional presentation. With the hybrid resume, potential employers will form an impression of you based on your best accomplishments, not just your most recent job description.
 
You should also realize that some of the old resume rules just don’t apply any more. For example:
 
·         “Limit your resume to one page.” This is a really old idea that limits your ability to show all of your skills and expertise.
 
·         “End your resume with References Available Upon Request.” You don’t need to say that; it’s assumed.
 
·         “You should show every job you have ever held and give each equal importance.” Your employment history should only go back as far as it related to your current employment objectives. Think of your resume as a marketing piece that highlights the best parts rather than as a tell-all.
 
·         “Your resume should go back no more than ten years.” Don’t use an arbitrary number to determine how much to include on your resume. Use the rule of relevancy to decide how many of your jobs to include.
 
·         “One resume should handle everything.” Not anymore! In addition to tailoring your resume to different fields or industries, you’ll also need to tailor the way that you save it.
 
You’ll want to have (1) a standard Word format (for printouts and as email attachments), and (2) a Plain Text version for online forms. This will save you a lot of time in repairing lost formatting, which often occurs when cutting and pasting a Word document into a text-only form.
 
Let your experience work for you rather than against you. Using these tips to update your resume can make a noticeable difference in interest from employers. And your new resume will be a better reflection of your hard-earned skills, talents, and expertise.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Deborah Walker, Certified Career Management Coach
Read more career tips and see sample resumes at:
www.AlphaAdvantage.com
email: Deb@Alphaadvantage.com


Next Article
Previous Article


Next Quarterly Education Session

 

Grandover Annual Meeting

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

 

Healthcare Law Update

Jodi Knox



This e-mail was sent by the American College of Healthcare Executives on behalf of the ACHE chapter in your area. If you would prefer not
to receive any chapter newsletters via e-mail, please send a message to 'chapters@ache.org' and enter "unsubscribe_chapter newsletters"
in the subject line. Please include your full name, mailing address, and affiliate ID number (if known).