ACHE of the Triad

Winter 2014

Message from the President

Vivian Langley
As the year, and my term as President, is drawing to a close, I thought it would be useful to reflect on the chapter's activities over the past year and review how the chapter carried out its mission.  Let me start by saying that 2014 was a great year for THEF as we experienced growth and implemented some new initiatives to better serve our members.

As the year, and my term as president, is drawing to a close, I thought it would be useful to reflect on the chapter's activities over the past year and review how the chapter carried out its mission. Let me start by saying that 2014 was a great year for THEF as we experienced growth and implemented some new initiatives to better serve our members.

First of all, THEF hosted three face-to-face educational events, offering our members 4.5 face-to-face credit hours. We also partnered with two local healthcare organizations, the Greater Greensboro Chapter of the Medical Group Managers and the Triangle Healthcare Executive Forum to offer educational events on a larger scale to our members. Partnership allows us to stretch our limited resources, reach more people, and give us the opportunity to network with colleagues in other chapters and specialties.

We also hosted a networking event over the summer. We had a great turnout of existing members and some new potential members. Those who attended had such a great time mingling that the Board decided that we would host at least two or three networking events in 2015. Networking events bring us together in a different, more personal way. Mark your calendars for our first networking event of 2015, to be held on February 12 at the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter. Details and registration information will be sent out soon.

Another milestone achievement for THEF in 2014 was implementing a sponsorship program. Sponsorships provide our chapter access to more resources which allow us to offer more educational events and keep our fees low. It also allows us to provide our members with more networking events. Many thanks go out to Mark Watson, Sponsorship Chair, for leading the charge to develop and implement our sponsorship program. I also want to thank KPMG, our platinum sponsor, for their generous contribution, which will enable THEF to carry out its mission.

On November 12, we hosted our annual dinner at the Grandover Resort and Conference Center. Laura Vail and LaVern Delaney from Cone Health engaged attendees in a discussion entitled, "Diversity in the Workplace: The Continuum of Curiosity." Pictured below are some of the attendees at the event:



We also voted on and installed the 2015 Board officers and introduced the new Committee Chairs. THEF expanded our Board of Directors to a team of 12 members for 2015. A larger board will bring more volunteers to the table to support our work and will bring new ideas and creativity to keep our chapter vibrant and moving in a positive direction. Listed below are the members of the 2015 Board of Directors:


2015 Board of Directors
President Garry Kauffman
President-Elect: Katy Davis
Secretary: Deana Knight
Treasurer: Michelle Bednarek
Director: Lisa Pennington
Director: Kwadwo Frimpong-Badu
Immediate Past President: Vivian Langley
Audit Chair: Brad Marino
Education Chair: Bridgett Sellars
Sponsorship Chair: Mark Watson
Education Liaison: Dr. Lisa Melvin
Student Associate: Eleanor Rivers

It has been an honor and privilege to have served as your president this year. Special thanks go to my fellow board members: Garry Kauffman, President-elect; Katy Davis, Secretary/Treasurer; Mark Watson, Director, Deana Knight, Director; Dr. Carol Vogt, Education Liaison; and Michelle Bednarek, Student Associate. Working beside each of you has been an honor and a pleasure. Thanks to those of you who participated at chapter events and activities. Please continue to stay involved in the chapter. It helps all of us as we advance our chosen profession.  

Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to be a part of this great team. Garry....I leave the job of president of THEF for 2015 in your very capable hands.

Happy Holidays to all!

Vivian

Message from Your ACHE Regent - Fall 2014

Read the most recent message from Joann Anderson, FACHE


A few months ago, I attended the strategic planning session of the Greater Charlotte Healthcare Executives chapter of ACHE. They did a great job evaluating the effectiveness of chapter activities, planning future initiatives and discussing ACHE goals. I was impressed with their commitment and energy.

One of the topics discussed at that session was mentorship. ACHE encourages all of us to serve as mentors to those entering healthcare leadership. If you have never served as a mentor, you may be missing a very fulfilling opportunity. As a mentor, I have often found it a way to renew my own spirit. To help others gain the confidence and knowledge to lead complicated departments or organizations can be extremely rewarding for those of us that find ourselves dealing with problem solving. It can infuse a sense of purpose and joy to our lives.

If you have interest in being a mentor or a mentee, I encourage you to go to the ACHE website to learn more about the opportunity. Discuss mentor programs with local chapter leadership. Step up and volunteer to mentor new leaders. Do it for them. Do it for you. And, do it for the future of healthcare.

Joann Anderson, FACHE
Regent - North Carolina

The Secrets to Career Fulfillment

 Come Monday morning, employees can yearn for the upcoming weekend and feel unmotivated and unhappy. However, research shows having a positive attitude about the week can greatly increase the success level and feeling of content for employees. In a survey of 850,000 people conducted by The Conference Board—a research group—researchers found those satisfied with their jobs tend to start the week off energized and motivated. Below are a few things fulfilled employees do differently...

Come Monday morning, employees can yearn for the upcoming weekend and feel unmotivated and unhappy. However, research shows having a positive attitude about the week can greatly increase the success level and feeling of content for employees. In a survey of 850,000 people conducted by The Conference Board—a research group—researchers found those satisfied with their jobs tend to start the week off energized and motivated. Below are a few things fulfilled employees do differently. 

Cut Back on the Small Talk

Matthias Mehl, a psychology professor at the University of Arizona, found people who engage in deep discussions, as opposed to small talk, are happier. This is because human beings are driven to find and create meaning in their lives. People who are more talkative can make themselves happier and more successful by focusing their discussions on substantive work issues and cutting back on short, meaningless conversations. You should strive to incorporate just one more thoughtful conversation each day regarding a work issue and avoid at least one small-chatter session. 

Avoid People Who Complain

Typically, there tends to be a group of people who complain about many aspects of their employing organization. However, complaining with no solution in mind is a dangerous habit. Sometimes just thinking more positively can create a better outlook on your position and organization. Search out ways to be authentically positive such as praising a coworker’s accomplishment or a team’s achievement of project goals. 

Make Every Assignment a Challenge

Start looking at each large project not only as a way to get things done but as an opportunity to learn and expand your skill set. Doing more than what is required, such as researching industry trends related to the project, talking with colleagues for best practices and creating innovative ideas, can improve both your project and your organization. The amount and quality of work you contribute to your company will likely be valued, and even on the slim chance it’s not, intrinsically you will feel better about yourself by knowing you gave a project your all.

Find a Strong Mentor

Every great employee needs that extra push to acknowledge what he or she is truly capable of. This typically means finding someone who can instruct, guide and push you to be your best. Obtaining a mentor, whether that be a boss, senior colleague or even a family member, can help you to excel in your work. To find someone who will be the most beneficial to you, ensure there is trust in the relationship, the proposed mentor has sufficient time and there is good chemistry. Once a mentorship is created, ask the coach to help you understand what success looks like; and have him assess your strengths and weaknesses and define the next steps in your career. 

Stay Committed

Some people looking for lifetime fulfillment will leave their jobs or stray from a secure path in order to find themselves. However, before jumping ship, a recommended strategy is to trying to bring a purpose to your current role. Take a long look at your position and find what differences you could make in your role or what you could do to challenge yourself more. Have regular conversations with managers, peers, family members and mentors who can give a valuable opinion. Also consider activities outside of work such as volunteering or new hobbies to obtain greater fulfilment.

  —Adapted from “5 Stealth Ways to Make Monday Better,” by Chester Elton, www.inc.com


 

Managing a Workforce of Multiple Generations

 For the first time in history, five generations—traditionalists, baby boomers, millennials, Gen X and Gen 2020—will soon be working side by side. Whether this multigenerational working environment feels productive and energizing or challenging and stressful is up to the organization’s leadership. Ideas to keep in mind are how to relate to employees from different age groups and how to motivate and encourage employees...

For the first time in history, five generations—traditionalists, baby boomers, millennials, Gen X and Gen 2020—will soon be working side by side. Whether this multigenerational working environment feels productive and energizing or challenging and stressful is up to the organization’s leadership. Ideas to keep in mind are how to relate to employees from different age groups and how to motivate and encourage employees.  


Straight From the Experts

As people work for longer periods of time, internal career paths start to change. It’s becoming common to see someone younger managing someone older, which can lead to tension on both sides. “It’s important to be aware of general tension among colleagues,” says Jeanne C. Meister, a founding partner of Future WorkPlace—an executive development firm. “It’s your job to help your employees recognize that they have distinct sets of different things they bring to the table.”


Don’t Dwell on Differences

Generational stereotypes abound both inside and outside of the working environment. However, creating generation-based employee affinity groups is not beneficial to your organization, instead get to know each person individually as opposed to lumping them into a group with people their age. 


Build Beneficial Relationships

Managing someone older than you can seem like a daunting task, but it’s something the military routinely practices. The way to make this successful is to make the older employee a partner—involve them in everything you do, as well as hearing them out. You’re still making the decisions, but this way they feel involved. This type of collaborative effort also works well in managing workers in their 20s. Encourage debate to ease the transition from school to the workplace. 


Study Your Employees

By studying the demographics of your employees, you can determine what they want out of their jobs and how these desires differ (or not) from generation to generation. Conducting a survey inquiring about communication styles, career goals and other topics is a low-cost way to get a pulse on your workforce. Figure out what matters to different groups of employees and what you can do to attract younger or more experienced workers; it’s an easy way to discover potential generational career issues. 


Engage in Cross-Generational Mentoring

Pairing younger workers with experienced employees to work on business objectives—typically revolving around technology—is becoming more prevalent in companies across the nation. The younger employee can teach the older worker about social media, while the seasoned employee can share institutional knowledge with the young worker. Studies show colleagues learn more from each other than they would in formal training. Mixed-age work teams are another way to foster cross-generational mentoring. 


Consider Work Goals

Keep in mind where your employees are at in their lives and what their needs are when it comes to inspiring and incentivizing them. Younger people may not have many outside responsibilities—they are motived by new experiences and opportunities. Employees in their 30s and 40s often have children and mortgages and need flexibility as well as advancement opportunities; while those at the end of their careers may not be as interested in training but would enjoy a strong work-life balance. Understanding these desires will go a long way in figuring out how to challenge and motivate employees. 

—Adapted from “Managing People From 5 Generations,” by Rebecca Knight, Harvard Business Review Blog Network 

 

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You will also find many opportunities to learn and grow in your career at a convenient location closer to home, saving you time and money on travel.

Connect Today. Contact our chapter leadership to find out who's waiting to welcome you.