ACHE of the Triad

Winter 2015

Message from the President

Garry Kauffman
Greetings fellow ACHE of the Triad Members!

Thanks to everyone who participated as engaged attendees at our educational sessions and as active (and relaxed) participants at our networking events. This was a highly successful year for our chapter. My thanks and gratitude go to our board members and committee chairs and members who were the ones who really made this a groundbreaking year for our chapter.

Greetings fellow ACHE of the Triad Members!

Thanks to everyone who participated as engaged attendees at our educational sessions and as active (and relaxed) participants at our networking events.  This was a highly successful year for our chapter.  My thanks and gratitude go to our board members and committee chairs and members who were the ones who really made this a groundbreaking year for our chapter.

We provided 7.5 face-to-face credits, which is a new record for our chapter.  As our members requested, we added 1.5 face-to-face credits to our annual meeting.  This addition was obviously a hit with our members because the 74 attendees set a new record of attendance for our annual meeting.  And...we had 18 students attend our meeting, which is critically important to our plan to build leadership development into our chapter's activities.  At our annual meeting, Vivian Langley, Immediate Past President, presented me with an ACHE achievement award, which I mentioned there, and will reinforce here, is the direct result of my honor to have collaborated with numerous healthcare leaders throughout my career in Pennsylvania and North Carolina.  Carol Vogt led our ACHE of the Triad Scholarship Committee and our committee was delighted to have received numerous applicants this year.  As a result, we were able to award two scholarships this year.

All of our educational program topics were selected by our members, as a direct result of suggestions made in the 2014 member survey.  It is clear that we achieved our goals of education because the attendance at our programs set new records.  Building on the success of our first networking event in 2014, we held several networking events this year.  These events have provided us with another means of connecting with non-members and communicating the value of ACHE membership.  These events both provided a much needed opportunity to de-stress from the rigors of our professional careers in a relaxed environment as well as provided another venue in which we could learn from one another.  Thanks to those of you who have attended our networking events this year and we look forward to seeing you at future events next year.

In closing, as I hand the reins to Katy Davis to lead us as our 2016 ACHE of the Triad President, we both welcome the opportunity to speak with any of you regarding activities of our chapter, educational programming you would like us to provide, community service opportunities to increase our visibility, and other opportunities that will increase our value to you, the members of ACHE of the Triad.

-Garry

Message from Your ACHE Regent - Winter 2016

Message from Your ACHE Regent
Winter 2016

I want to congratulate each of the North Carolina chapters on their educational programs for the fall of 2015.  I had the opportunity to attend a couple of the programs.  The quality of the speakers was excellent and the topics timely.  Those that I did not have the opportunity to attend had equally qualified speakers.  Thanks to all who assisted in putting the programs together.  I know it takes time and effort.

Congratulations also go out to the Greater Charlotte Healthcare Executives Group.  They have successfully developed 16 mentor/mentee pairs this year.  Many thanks to those mentors who are sharing their knowledge to develop stronger, future leaders.  For those who might be interested in being a mentor or having a mentor, I encourage you to contact your local chapter for assistance.  You will also find information on the structure of the ACHE Mentoring program online.   There are some great tools to make the experience a positive one for each person involved. 

As I plan for next year, I have scheduled an ACHE breakfast during the NCHA Winter meeting.  On Feb. 19, 2016, Chairman-Elect Edward H. Lamb, FACHE will address breakfast attendees. Please let me know if you would like additional information on the breakfast.  Additionally, I hope you are making plans to attend ACHE Congress March 14-17, 2016 in Chicago.  For more information refer to ache.org/Congress.  Registration is now open.  I hope to see each of you there.

Joann Anderson, FACHE
Regent for North Carolina

Improving Communication for Better Retention

Although compensation can be one reason why employees choose to leave a company, poor communication and ineffective management also are contributing factors. Improving the way in which you interact with your employees will strengthen their loyalty to you. Below are ways to sharpen your communication tactics.

Although compensation can be one reason why employees choose to leave a company, poor communication and ineffective management also are contributing factors. Improving the way in which you interact with your employees will strengthen their loyalty to you. Below are ways to sharpen your communication tactics.
  • Listen. Don’t plan your response to a conversation while speaking with an employee. Listen, then respond. 
  • Free your schedule. Information and input shouldn’t only take place in casual conversations when briefly crossing paths with someone. Schedule regular appointments with employees for one-on-one discussions.
     
  • Be transparent. When something occurs within your organization that affects your subordinates, inform them as soon as possible with all of the appropriate information. Don’t withhold bad news for fear of lowering morale—instill trust by sharing all you know.  
  • Remain consistent. Don’t promise one thing and act in a way that contradicts what you’ve said. Stay true to the promise you make to promote honesty and integrity. 
  • Provide regular feedback. No matter whether an employee’s performance is good or poor, be upfront and honest and provide regular feedback. When performance can be improved, coach the employee on actions to take moving forward. 
  • Step out of your office. Email is an efficient and easy form of communication, but it isn’t a substitute for one-on-one, personal conversations. Talk to your team face to face as often as possible to show you are paying attention to what is happening in the organization and that you care about their performance.
 
—Adapted from Communication Solutions October 2015 newsletter, www.communicationbriefings.com .
 

Host a Successful Feedback Session

Feedback given during one-on-one employee meetings cannot lead to desired results without a proper plan in place. Keep in mind that the goal of feedback is not to criticize or praise, but to influence behavior and come up with concrete solutions for improvement. Generate a positive outcome and strengthen your workforce with these strategies.

Feedback given during one-on-one employee meetings cannot lead to desired results without a proper plan in place. Keep in mind that the goal of feedback is not to criticize or praise, but to influence behavior and come up with concrete solutions for improvement. Generate a positive outcome and strengthen your workforce with these strategies.

Evaluate your relationship. Think about how well you know the employee and whether the relationship has been formal or friendly. Reflect on the feedback you have given the employee in the past, and ask yourself whether you have thoroughly and clearly explained requirements, expectations and metrics for that person’s role.

Plan the meeting. Construct an outline or schedule of topics and talking points you wish to cover in your meeting. This will allow the meeting to progress more smoothly and ensures you won’t forget anything you hope to cover. Include positive and negative examples of behavior, and come up with suggestions for potential solutions. Be prepared to be flexible throughout the conversation. It might not go to the way you planned, and you need to be ready to change course based on the person’s reaction.

Be firm but fair. Try to offer even negative feedback in a way that respects the employee. People tend to shut down when someone is heavily criticizing their behavior and performance. Don’t sugarcoat the information, but try to add something positive to what you’re trying to convey. A mistake can be sign of an employee’s desire to do the right thing, and recognizing this will mold your feedback in such a way that makes it easier to accept.

Take responsibility. Make sure to stand behind your feedback. Don’t speak for other people unless the situation requires it. This could perhaps be a group problem or an allegation of harassment. Blaming those above you will undercut the employee’s respect for you and your position.

Give people time to reflect on your feedback. Do not expect employees to instantly accept your information and yield immediate results. Effective feedback shouldn’t come as a complete surprise to the employee, but some people may need time to think about and process what you have told them. Listen to what they say; you might not agree, but showing that you hear them and appreciate their own feedback will increase your chances of a constructive outcome.

—Adapted from Communication Solutions October 2015 newsletter, www.communicationbriefings.com.