August 5, 2014
Association Highlights
 
Last Chance to Register for AGC's Annual Golf Classic! Register NOW!
Monday, August 11th at Ironwood Golf Course

It's almost time to tee off for AGC's Annual Golf Classic! Registration will close Wednesday at the end of the business day!  If you haven't already, please sumbit the names of your team members to Kim Jalalian at the AGC Offices.

While Sponsorship Opportunities for this event are closed, you can still donate Raffle, Hole Contest, or Door Prizes.   All proceeds of this event benefit the Education & Research Foundation, which provides scholarships to students entering the construction field at local Colleges and Universities, so please consider donating to this worthy cause.  Thank you in advance for your support!

For more information, please contact Kim Jalalian at kjalalian@agc-gm.org or (414) 778-4100.

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AGC's Advanced Management Program

Strategic, Resourceful and Decisive!

For construction leaders on the rise, no program provides a more comprehensive, uniquely focused program than AGC's Advanced Management Program (AMP).

Held just one time each year, this exclusive six-day program grounds construction industry executives in the essential skills and techniques required to successfully lead an organization.

Upcoming Courses
November 9-14, 2014 - Dallas, TX
Cooper Guest Lodge
Dallas, TX

Course Highlights:
•Strategic & Financial Management
•Risk Management
•Leadership
•Contract Dispute Resolution
•Leading Change
•Construction Ethics
•Safety Management
•Reputation & Media Management
•Construction Productivity

Go To Registration Page

 

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Upcoming Trainings from The Knowledge Source
 
Rough Terrain Forklift Operator Training
August 25th, 4:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Corp. GC/CM - $25, Associate - $40, *CBA’s - $50, Non-Affiliated IAP $80
Dan Burazin, AGC of Greater Milwaukee

Rough terrain forklift training vividly impresses upon the students the necessity for safety in all aspects of lift truck operations and procedures.  The safety standards reviewed in detail include graphic illustrations of the personal and economic dangers inherent in the use of forklift equipment.  The step-by-step progression of this training is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills to become a safe and professional forklift operator.  This is the classroom portion of the total training requirement for rough terrain forklifts. 
Intended Audience: This course is intended for all individuals on a jobsite who may be charged with operating a forklift at any time.

To register, please contact Kim Jalalian at kjalalian@agc-gm.org or 414-778-4100.

*Collective Bargaining Authorization to AGC of Greater Milwaukee

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First Aid/CPR/AED Training
August 27th & 28th, 4:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Corp. GC/CM - $60, Associate - $70, *CBA’s - $85, Non-Affiliated IAP - $125
Gert Grohmann, AGC of Greater Milwaukee

Medic First Aid, CPR and AED training is designed specifically for the occupational first aid provider.  This extremely valuable program will help employers comply with OSHA and other federal and state regulatory requirements for training employees on how to respond and care for medical emergencies at work.  Two-year certification cards are issued upon completion of this course. 
Intended Audience:  This course is for any adult who wishes to become certified in First Aid/CPR/AED, especially those charged with the responsibility to respond in an emergency. 

To register, please contact Kim Jalalian at kjalalian@agc-gm.org or 414-778-4100.

*Collective Bargaining Authorization to AGC of Greater Milwaukee

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STP 7: Accident Prevention and Loss Control
September 15th, 17th, 22nd & 24th, 4:30 pm to 7:30 pm

Corp. GC/CM - $150, Associate - $270, *CBA’s - $300, Non-Affiliated IAP - $450
Dan Burazin and Gert Grohmann, AGC of Greater Milwaukee

Unit sevens includes more performance-based concepts, development of a risk management philosophy, focuses on today’s needs for overall site safety management and addresses the cost of accidents and consequences of poor safety performance.

Participants in Unit 7 course will cover:
• An introduction to site safety and health management
• Safety leadership, communication and expectations
• Planning for site safety
• Site safety management
• Site security and projection
• Multi-employer jobsite safety
• Construction risk management
• Safety and human resources
• Regulatory procedures, record keeping and documentation
• Safety reference material and other resources

To register, please contact Kim Jalalian at kjalalian@agc-gm.org or 414-778-4100.

*Collective Bargaining Authorization to AGC of Greater Milwaukee

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OSHA 10-Hour for Construction
September 16th, 18th, 23rd & 25th, 4:30 pm to 7:00 pm

Corp. GC/CM - $115, Associate - $155, *CBA’s - $175, Non-Affiliated IAP - $250
Gert Grohmann & Dan Burazin, AGC of Greater Milwaukee

Need your OSHA 10-Hour training card to get on the job?  You’ve come to the right place!  This 10-Hour construction safety course was developed by the US Department of Labor to provide construction workers, supervisors, and other personnel responsible for construction activities with an awareness of construction safety and health concerns in the construction industry.  All attendees will become familiar with reading and using the OSHA standards for construction 23 CFR 1926.  Other construction safety and health standards are also discussed.  Attendees receive an update and review of standard construction safety and health principles and information that prepares them to recognize and control a variety of hazardous conditions.  An OSHA card will be issued. 
Intended Audience: This course is intended for anyone within the industry who has a stake in jobsite safety, especially field crews.

To register, please contact Kim Jalalian at kjalalian@agc-gm.org or 414-778-4100.

*Collective Bargaining Authorization to AGC of Greater Milwaukee

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In the News
 
Construction Employment Increases in 215 of 339 Metro Areas in June YoY
26 Areas Exceed Previous Highs for the Month

Construction employment expanded in 215 metro areas, declined in 80 and was stagnant in 44 between June 2013 and June 2014, according to a new analysis of federal employment data released today by the Associated General Contractors of America. Association officials noted that uncertainty about a range of federal infrastructure and construction programs could weigh on future growth for the sector.

"Contractors have been expanding their work force in about two-thirds of the country for several months in a row," said Ken Simonson, the association's chief economist. "Some metro areas are adding workers at a strong clip, but the gains remain modest and sporadic in many localities."

Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas added the largest number of construction jobs in the past year (11,700 jobs, 10 percent), followed by Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Calif. (10,000 jobs, 9 percent), Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, Ill. (8,200 jobs, 7 percent) and Baton Rouge, La. (5,900 jobs, 13 percent). The largest percentage gains occurred in Monroe, Mich. (29 percent, 600 jobs), Lake Charles, La. (25 percent, 2,700 jobs), Pascagoula, Miss. (25 percent, 1,500 jobs) and El Centro, Calif. (23 percent, 500 jobs).

The largest job losses from June 2013 to June 2014 were in Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick, Md. (-4,200 jobs, -13 percent), followed by Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, Ariz. (-2,900 jobs, -3 percent), Gary, Ind. (-2,300 jobs, -12 percent) and Putnam-Rockland-Westchester, N.Y. (-1,800 jobs, -6 percent). The largest percentage decline for the past year was in Cheyenne, Wyo. (-18 percent, -700 jobs), followed by Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick, Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton, N.J. (-13 percent, -300 jobs), Gary, and Steubenville-Weirton, Ohio-W.V. (-12 percent, -200 jobs).

El Centro experienced the largest percentage increase (23 percent, 500 jobs higher than June 2013) among the 26 metro areas that topped their prior June construction employment highs. Baton Rouge added the most jobs since reaching its prior June peak in 2013 (5,900 jobs, 13 percent). Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale (-93,700 jobs, -50 percent) experienced the largest drop in total construction employment compared to its prior June peak (reached in 2006) while Lake Havasu City-Kingman, Ariz. experienced the largest percentage decline compared to its June 2006 peak (-68 percent, -5,400 jobs).

Association officials noted that signs of uncertainty about a range of federal infrastructure and construction programs could undermine future construction employment growth. They urged Congress to quickly pass a "continuing resolution" that would set federal spending levels for next year and to enact long-term surface transportation legislation. Having these measures in place would make it easier for many construction firms to make hiring, purchasing and expansion plans, they added.

"Even as the overall economy continues to recover, many firms that work on federally-funded projects are having a hard time making hiring, equipment purchasing and expansion plans," said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association's chief executive officer. "It is hard to make sound business decisions when you don't know how much work will be available in the near future."

View construction employment figures by state and rank.

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Construction Industry Shifts Marketing Strategies to Bring in Younger Workers

The construction business is looking for a few good gamers.

Trying to shake its image as dirty, backbreaking labor and attract younger workers, the industry—from construction firms and trade groups to equipment manufacturers and machinery makers—is marketing itself as a place to use advanced math, science and technical skills.

There's a good reason why the industry, now going into its busy season, needs to rework its pitch: 74% of construction firms report they are having trouble finding carpenters, electricians, plumbers and welders, according to a 2013 survey by industry trade group Associated General Contractors of America.

"Construction work is somewhat different from what it was," said Ken Simonson, economist for the group, which is one of several partners supporting a marketing campaign run by the National Center for Construction Education and Research. "There is much more use of laser and GPS-guided equipment, building-information modeling and other things that require computer skills and use of technology that was not common before the recession."

Take, for example, the mobile-crane operator, a job well suited for younger people. "Because they played video games for so long, their hand-eye coordination is very fast and advanced," said L.J. Zielke, president of Allied Career Training, an apprenticeship program for heavy-equipment operators.
In the NCCER's "Build Your Future" campaign, videos show workers brandishing iPads and electronic blueprints.

The group also hosts career days and assists with training and job placement to get young people thinking about a future in construction. "The misconceptions of the construction industry have to be addressed as early as elementary school," said Jennifer Wilkerson, head of marketing for the center.

The national campaign, launched in 1997 and ramped up in 2010, has recently increased its focus on younger generations. The push includes online video, TV, radio, digital and print ads in trade publications, and teacher and recruiter resources like posters, bookmarks and trading cards. Launch Media, a videography firm based in Baton Rouge, La., worked on the videos; the rest of the campaign was done in-house. In addition to trade groups like the Associated Builders and Contractors, the push is funded by educational organizations like Pearson and construction partners such as Fluor Corp. Last year, $260,000 went toward the program, according to the 2013 NCCER annual report.

A hand from Rowe
Home-improvement retailer Lowe's sponsors Skills USA, a nonprofit aimed at developing America's skilled workforce. The partnership helps prepare teachers, high school and college students for careers in construction and other skilled services through training programs. Lowe's grants help fund community-outreach programs and TeamWorks, a competition that challenges students from different disciplines to complete a project together over three days.

Mike Rowe, from the TV show "Dirty Jobs," has been beating the drum for skilled trades for years. His foundation, Mike Rowe Works, offers scholarships to promote hard work and support skilled trades. Mr. Rowe also worked with Go Build Alabama, an initiative by the Alabama Construction Recruitment Institute that shows the worker as "hero" and tries to change the perception of construction as dirty, labor-intensive work. Its website and videos break down trade careers with information on wages and skills and connects visitors with training programs in the state.

Digital, social and grassroots efforts have been Go Build's primary tools for targeting young people. It has redesigned its website to be more compatible with mobile devices. It's also planning an e-textbook, responsive ads and behavioral geo-targeting on social media. It may soon include gamification badges as well. Big Communications, based in Birmingham, Ala., worked on the campaign.

On the theory that a booming construction business benefits equipment manufacturers, welding-products manufacturer Miller Electric is running a campaign portraying construction work as an attractive career option. Miller's "We Build" social-media push, created by Two Rivers Marketing, Des Moines, encourages welders to share projects built with Miller equipment for the chance to win trips to stadiums built by welders, along with a tour of Miller headquarters in Appleton, Wis.

Eighteen-year-old Kristen Booker took her first welding class in high school just to try something new. After additional training in Alabama, she is poised to start her career at Performance Contractors, a job she lined up before graduating in May.

The construction industry is eager to tap the labor pool of women like Ms. Booker, calling on tradeswomen to serve as role models.

"Construction is where it's at right now," said Lee Cunningham, president of Women Construction Owners and Executives. "We make good money and work regular hours. It's a profession that people can be proud to do."

Construction firm Robins & Morton has a mentorship program that addresses the concerns of female workers. "We talk about things like financial decision making, what life is like on the road as a tradeswoman, and what it's like to work in an environment that is dominated by males," said Mittie Cannon, director-workforce development. Mentoring also helps women deal with concerns about sexual harassment, she said, although many men are embracing the changing workplace.

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In This Issue
Association Highlights
Last Chance to Register for AGC's Annual Golf Classic! Register NOW!
AGC's Advanced Management Program
Upcoming Trainings from The Knowledge Source
Rough Terrain Forklift Operator Training
First Aid/CPR/AED Training
STP 7: Accident Prevention and Loss Control
OSHA 10-Hour for Construction
In the News
Construction Employment Increases in 215 of 339 Metro Areas in June YoY
Construction Industry Shifts Marketing Strategies to Bring in Younger Workers
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AGC of America Website
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