July 18, 2017
Association Highlights
 
AGC Education & Research Foundation Golf Classic!


Monday, August 14th at the Exclusive Wisconsin Country Club

Registration is now open for the Annual AGC Golf Classic!  It will be held Monday, August 14th at the exclusive Wisconsin Country Club.  All proceeds from this event go toward funding scholarships to our local universities for students entering construction studies through the AGC Education & Research Foundation.  Your participation and sponsorship is what makes providing these scholarships possible! With your help, we have raised over $300,000 for scholarship over the past 10 years.

The beautiful Wisconsin Country Club provides 18 challenging holes to test your skills. Attending the AGC Education & Research Foundation Annual Golf Classic provides a great networking opportunity for construction leaders and their staff.  Your fee includes golf, cart, lunch, reception, dinner, day-long refreshments, door prizes and skill prizes.    To register, please contact Kim Jalalian at kjalalian@agc-gm.org or at (414) 778-4100.

Thank you to our Generous Sponsors

Aon Risk Solutions
Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP
Brehmer Agency, Inc.
CG Schmidt, Inc.
Circle Electric, Inc.
CliftonLarsonAllen
Common Links Construction LLC
Cornerstone Plumbing, LLC
Dawes Rigging and Crane Rental
Esch Construction Supply, Inc.
Gateway Concrete Forming Systems, Inc.
Gilbane Building Company
Hausmann Johnson Insurance
Hays Companies of Wisconsin
Hetzel-Sanfilippo Inc.
Ideal Crane Rental, Inc.
iSqFt
J.H. Findorff & Son Inc.
J.M. Brennan, Inc.
Langer Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc.
Lincoln Contractors Supply Inc.
Michels Foundations
Midwest Drilled Foundations & Engineering Inc.
Mortenson Construction
Olympic Companies, Inc.
Ozinga Ready Mix Concrete Inc.
Professional Service Industries, Inc.
R & R Insurance Services, Inc.
Spancrete
The Blue Book Network
The Daily Reporter
The PrivateBank and Trust Company
The VanderBloemen Group LLC
Tioga HVAC Rentals
VerHalen Commercial Interiors
Zurich

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CLC Golf Outing Raises Over $4000 for Scholarship Fund!
Thank you to all who sponosred and paticipated!

Though the clouds covered the sky and there was an occasional bout of drizzling rain, it couldn't dampen the spirits of the sold-out crowd at the 14th Annual CLC Golf Outing!  This year, in addition to supporting CLC programming, participation and sponsorship also supported a new CLC Scholarship Fund!  Together we raised $4085 to support the new scolarships benefiting students at MSOE, Marquette University, and UWM.We had some fun features, such as the Golf Cannon sponsored by Langer Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc. and a Ball Toss contest, that helped to raise these funds.

See All the Action Here in our Photo Album!

Tournament Winners:

Third Place Winners: Score of 13 under par
Nick Musolf - JM Brennan, Inc.
Matt Brennan - JM Brennan, Inc.
April Hannon - JM Brennan, Inc.
Brent Arnold - Hunzinger Construction

Second Place Winners: Score of 14 under par
Paul Olsen - La Force, Inc.
Pat Connelly - La Force, Inc.
Dan Davies - La Force, Inc.
Phil Vetterkind - La Force, Inc.

First Place Winners: Score of 14 under par and winners of the tie-breaker
Gene Sheedy - Midwest Drilled Foundations & Engineering Inc.
Rod Dettbarn - Midwest Drilled Foundations & Engineering Inc.
Rupert Kotze - Kotze Construction Co., Inc.
Andy Miller - Midwest Drilled Foundations & Engineering Inc.

Hole Contest Winners:
Birr 2, Closest in 2: Stack'o'Beer - Randy Hill, David J Frank Landcaping Contractors
Birr 5, Longest Putt: Summer Refreshment Dispensers - Eric Steinbrecker, Lincoln Contractor Supply Inc.
Birr 7, LongestDrive: Zero-Gravity Rocking Lounger - Gene Sheedy, Midwest Drilled Foundations & Engineering Inc.
Meath 5, Longest Drive: Pocket Camera Drone -  Alex Nord, Veit Companies
Meath 7, Closest in 1: Sandless Beach Loungers - Zach Albert, JP Cullen & Sons, Inc.
Meath 9, Longest Putt: Badminton Court - Nick Henricksen, Pieper Electric


Thank You again to all our Sponsors!

Eagle Sponsors
Aon Risk Solutions
CG Schmidt, Inc.
David J. Frank Landscape Contracting, Inc.
Dawes Rigging and Crane Rental
Doral Corporation
J.F. Ahern Co.
J.H. Findorff & Son Inc.
Mortenson Construction
Olympic Companies, Inc.
Pieper Electric (Double Eagle)
State Painting Co.
VerHalen Commercial Interiors
VJS Construction Services

Hole Contest Sponsor
Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.

Tee & Table Sponsor
J.F. Ahern Co.
Langer Roofing & Sheet Metal Inc.
Professional Service Industries, Inc.

Tee Sponsor
Coates Electric

Hole Sponsor
Boehlke Bottled Gas Corp.
KMI Construction
Lincoln Contractor Supply Inc./Fabick
NEXT Electric, Inc.

Sign Sponsor
iSqFt
The Blue Book Network

Lunch Sponsor


Dinner Sponsor
Creative Constructors, LLC

Exclusive Keg Sponsor
LaForce Inc.

Refreshment Stand
FJA Christiansen Roofing
Midwest Drilled Foundations & Engineering Inc.

Refreshment Cart
Hausmann-Johnson Insurance
Lee Electrical
Lee Mechanical
Nations Roof North LLC

Raffle Donation
AGC of Greater Milwaukee
Dawes Rigging and Crane Rental
Hunzinger Construction
Lincoln Contractor Supply Inc./Fabick
The Milwaukee Brewers

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Video: Marquette University Explains What it Takes to be a Civil Engineer
Put simply, construction engineers make things happen. They take plans created by civil engineers and architects and convert them into the grandest realities. They build things — big things — roads, skyscrapers, power plants, sports facilities, you name it. Construction engineers love to build, and they revel in the challenges each project presents: unique locations, team members, climates, budget and legal issues. Construction engineers are adept problem solvers who know how to manage costs, people and schedules.

Watch this video to learn what it means to study construction engineering at Marquette University.
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There's Still Time: AGC's 9th Annual IT Forum will be Held August 3-4 in Denver, CO! Register Now!

The ultimate goal of this conference is to give attendees excellent, practical take-aways from each session, and provide great networking with other technology professionals in the industry.  Leave conference with ideas that could make near-term and long-term positive impact on your company’s bottom-line!  Register Here

Here is a message from Howie Piersma, Chairman of the IT Forum Steering Committee:

“It is my pleasure to announce the upcoming 2017 IT Conference. Last year we set yet another record with over 350 attendees, and this year will be even bigger and better.

To celebrate our 9th annual conference, we’ve introduced a few refreshing changes. For the first time, the conference will be held in the beautiful city of Denver, Colorado. This year we’ll also host breakout sessions, in addition to our regular auditorium discourse format, to help focus the discussions on the real-world challenges that we are facing in the field every day.

We have an amazing group of industry professionals and innovative pioneers eager to transform and revolutionize IT Construction, led by Keynote speaker and Spectrum AEC Founder and Chief Enabling Officer, Nathan Wood. In addition, our Rapid Fire Demos, and interactive Topic Sessions are designed to bring together construction and technology like never before. We can’t wait to see you in August.”

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Help AGC of America Measure the Scope of Construction Labor Shortages
Help AGC of America measure the scope of construction labor shortages by taking the following quick survey.   Take the Survey Here!
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Get the 2017 Construction Tech Report This Fall

The team at JBKnowledge has presented at the AGC-A's IT Forum Conference a few times and its always the highlight of the conference.

Its 2017 Construction Tech Survey is now live and over 1,200 construction professionals have already taken the survey this year, and they hope you'll help them get to 3,000.

Every year, the survey provides incredible insight and data on the latest trends and solutions in construction technology. Construction companies around the world use the resulting report to benchmark their technology efforts every year. By completing the survey, you'll receive a complimentary copy of the full 2017 Construction Tech Report when it's released this fall. (See past reports here.)

Complete the survey here and get the statistics and insight to improve the IT strategy for your company and your everyday workflows.
 
JBKnowledge thanks you in advance for your time and consideration. They look forward to sharing the results with you this fall!

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In the News
 
Why It's Important to Have a Plan B

The construction industry was the number one workplace for fatalities in 2015 according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). There were a total of 4,379 worker fatalities in private industry in 2015 and 21.4 percent of those deaths were workers in the construction industry. These numbers make it evident that construction executives need solutions for monitoring the health and safety of their workers. And, workers need the most efficient means possible to report and react to emergencies.

Excluding highway collisions, the top causes of death in the construction industry were falls, a person being struck by an object, electrocution, and a person being caught-in or between objects. The Bureau of Labor Statistics sites that in 2015 these four causes were responsible for 64.2 percent of construction worker deaths.

These causes of death illustrate how difficult it could be for a construction worker to place a 911 call in an emergency. After a fall or being struck by an object, a worker could likely be unconscious. A common scenario for each of these causes is the inability of the construction worker to make use of a cell phone to reach help.

According to the Pew Research Center, approximately 95 percent of Americans now own a cell phone of some type and more than one-third own a smartphone. While these devices provide many conveniences, in emergency situations these devices remain highly limited.

For example, a cell phone is not able to detect if someone slipped off a roof, triggered a staple gun and sent a nail through a hand or foot, or any number of other emergencies that can occur on a jobsite. With a cell phone the user is still required to be conscious and within range of the phone to be able to make a call for help. In the case of mobile workers and lone workers, these devices are not the most reliable or function-rich options for tracking and monitoring employee safety and health. Additionally, in the case where a lone worker is confronted by a hostile third party, the cell phone is the first item often taken so as to prevent a call for help.

A better solution is relying on easily worn devices (i.e., wearables or wearable devices) that automatically report changes that could indicate an emergency. Another option is a device that a worker could easily utilize to express the need for help without having to speak or make much of a movement.

Fueled greatly by consumers rapidly adopting fitness trackers and smart watches, the global wearables market is expected to reach a value of $19 billion in 2018. But, the construction industry could also become an influential customer shaping this evolving space. Already there are products like smart hard harts, smart safety vests, smart eyewear and even stick-on patches that can monitor everything from an employee’s location to body temperature and positioning. These devices eliminate the need for a worker to proactively report an emergency, but like cell phones they have their limitations.

For example, while the devices are able to transmit certain information about a situation to a manager or human resources department, they do not create a direct line of communication between the worker and responder. If verbal communication is possible in the emergency situation, the worker would still need to place a call on a phone.

Potentially a better option for the construction industry would be mPERS devices, similar to those used by seniors for years. Essentially, they are help buttons that can be pressed after a fall to alert emergency responders that assistance is needed. These types of technologies have become more beneficial because they no longer require a base station device to place calls, limiting their range of use.

Like other wearables, mPERS devices are small and lightweight. They provide state-of-the-art location technologies, and also offer built-in fall advisory capabilities. Wearables with this type of functionality are able to detect horizontal and vertical movement, but taking it a step further than simply reporting a fall on the job via a text message or red flag in a software system, mPERS devices can also eliminate the need for the worker to initiate a call for help. Instead, they can trigger one automatically. And, cloud-based technologies can make it possible for central stations to immediately respond to the call for help.

Another benefit of mPERS devices is the long battery life. Unlike phones that sometimes have to be charged multiple times a day, mPERS devices have less functions and do not need to be fully functional at all times. They can be left off or essentially in a hibernation mode until the SOS button on the device is pressed. Once this action occurs, location information can be sent to a central reporting destination and an emergency call can be placed. This enables mPERS devices to have battery lives of up to 30 days on one charge.

Whatever wearable device makes the most sense for a particular construction company, the most important factor is that business owners and managers take advantage of these new technologies that could potentially save lives and improve the safety and health of their employees.

Read Original Article

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The Construction Industry is Short on Human Workers and Ripe for a Robotic Takeover
Construction is one of the least-digitized industries in the world, and its productivity is suffering.

Construction is a $10 trillion global industry. It’s also mired by waste, severe worker shortages and weak productivity growth — all of which mean the business of building is ripe for a robotic takeover.

Productivity — the total economic output per worker — in the construction industry has remained flat, partly because of the slow adoption of new technologies across the industry.

Since 1945, productivity in manufacturing, retail and agriculture has grown 1,500 percent, while it has barely gone up in construction, according to a McKinsey report from earlier this year.

McKinsey compared U.S. industries in 27 criteria, including how much a sector spends on technology and how extensively they use computers in their operations, to create a digitization index of 1 to 100, with 100 being the most digitized.

Read Full Article Here

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In This Issue
Association Highlights
AGC Education & Research Foundation Golf Classic!
CLC Golf Outing Raises Over $4000 for Scholarship Fund!
Video: Marquette University Explains What it Takes to be a Civil Engineer
There's Still Time: AGC's 9th Annual IT Forum will be Held August 3-4 in Denver, CO! Register Now!
Help AGC of America Measure the Scope of Construction Labor Shortages
Get the 2017 Construction Tech Report This Fall
In the News
Why It's Important to Have a Plan B
The Construction Industry is Short on Human Workers and Ripe for a Robotic Takeover
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