Human Resource & Labor News
www.agc.orgJanuary 11, 2018 / Issue No. 01-18
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On the Inside
Labor Relations
December Brought Significant Changes in NLRB Positions and Composition, Including AGC-Supported Reversal of Joint-Employer Ruling
Building Trades Leader to Speak at AGC Convention Next Month
Wage and Hour
DOL Drops Six-Factor Unpaid Intern Test
DOL Reissues 17 Wage and Hour Opinion Letters
Pay and Benefits
Construction Support Staff Wages Expected to Rise by 3.3% This Year
DOL Proposes New Rules Expanding Association Health Plan Options
Wage and Hour
DOL Drops Six-Factor Unpaid Intern Test
 

On Dec. 19, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit became the fourth federal appellate court to expressly reject the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) six-part test for determining whether interns and students are employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). On January 5, 2018, the DOL clarified that going forward, the Department will conform to these appellate court rulings by using the same “primary beneficiary” test that these courts use to determine whether interns are employees under the FLSA.

The new seven-factor “primary beneficiary” test looks at whether the intern or the employer is the primary beneficiary of the relationship. The DOL believes the new test will offer more flexibility without a single determining factor and that the determination of whether an intern or student is an employee under the FLSA depends on the unique facts and circumstances of each case. The seven factors to consider in determinations are:

  1. The extent to which the intern and the employer clearly understand that there is no expectation of compensation. Any promise of compensation, express or implied, suggests that the intern is an employee—and vice versa.
  2. The extent to which the internship provides training that would be similar to that which would be given in an educational environment, including the clinical and other hands-on training provided by educational institutions.
  3. The extent to which the internship is tied to the intern’s formal education program by integrated coursework or the receipt of academic credit.
  4. The extent to which the internship accommodates the intern’s academic commitments by corresponding to the academic calendar.
  5. The extent to which the internship’s duration is limited to the period in which the internship provides the intern with beneficial learning.
  6. The extent to which the intern’s work complements, rather than displaces, the work of paid employees while providing significant educational benefits to the intern.
  7. The extent to which the intern and the employer understand that the internship is conducted without entitlement to a paid job at the conclusion of the internship.

The DOL said that its Wage and Hour Division will update its enforcement policies to align with recent case law, eliminate unnecessary confusion among the regulated community, and provide the Division’s investigators with increased flexibility to holistically analyze internships on a case-by-case basis.

For more information, contact Claiborne Guy at claiborne.guy@agc.org or 703-837-5382.
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