AGC's Human Resource and Labor News - December 1, 2009 / Issue No. 5-09 (Print All Articles)

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Davis-Bacon Webinar Series Begins This Week: Register Today!

Are you or your company facing federal prevailing wage laws for the first time? With the downturn in the availability of commercial work, many construction contractors are bidding on federal and federally-assisted work, and having to comply with the Davis Bacon and Related Acts for the first time. The application of the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts to all projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 leaves many contractors uncertain about the requirements of federal prevailing wage laws and the consequences of non-compliance. To help, AGC is offering a three-part webinar series during which industry experts, including the head of enforcement for the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage & Hour Division (WHD) and the head of the Davis-Bacon Wage Determinations division of WHD, will provide the information necessary to understand the specific requirements of the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts in a contractor-friendly manner.

Are you or your company facing federal prevailing wage laws for the first time? With the downturn in the availability of commercial work, many construction contractors are bidding on federal and federally-assisted work, and having to comply with the Davis Bacon and Related Acts for the first time. The application of the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts to all projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 leaves many contractors uncertain about the requirements of federal prevailing wage laws and the consequences of non-compliance. To help, AGC is offering a three-part webinar series during which industry experts, including the head of enforcement for the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage & Hour Division (WHD) and the head of the Davis-Bacon Wage Determinations division of WHD, will provide the information necessary to understand the specific requirements of the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts in a contractor-friendly manner.

The Davis-Bacon and Related Acts: The Ins and Outs of Federal Prevailing Wage Law

December 3, 2009 | December 8, 2009 | December 10, 2009
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM ET

December 3:  Introduction to the Davis Bacon Act and Wage Determinations
December 8:  Compliance Principles
December 10:  Reporting Requirements & Enforcement


Register today at www.agc.org/DBWebinar or download the webinar flyer.

 

Earn 1.5 HRCI Recertification Credit Hours for Each Webinar - 4.5 for all Three!
This program has been approved for 1.5 general recertification credit hours toward PHR, SPHR and GPHR recertification through the HR Certification Institute. The use of this seal is not an endorsement by the HR Certification Institute of the quality of the program. It means that this program has met the HR Certification Institute's criteria to be pre-approved for recertification credit.

 

Sponsored by:

  e-MARS
     "Compliancy at Your Fingertips"


Drive Against Distraction Program Calls on Contractors

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood is calling on employers to enact a written policy that prohibits employees from using a phone or messaging device while driving.  Resources for developing such a policy are available on the Secretary's blog.

Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood is calling on employers to enact a written policy that prohibits employees from using a phone or messaging device while driving.  Resources for developing such a policy are available on the Secretary's blog.

The Drive Against Distraction program is aimed at keeping everyone safe on the nation's roads.  Employers that embrace this plan are encouraged to write about it on the Secretary's blog.


EEOC Mandates Use of Revised Poster, Effective November 21, 2009

Beginning on November 21, 2009, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is requiring employers to post a revised "Equal Employment Opportunity is the Law" poster.  The new poster now includes language regarding the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), which became effective on November 21, 2009, and the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA), which became effective on January 1 of the same year.

Beginning on November 21, 2009, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is requiring employers to post a revised "Equal Employment Opportunity is the Law" poster.  The new poster now includes language regarding the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA), which became effective on November 21, 2009, and the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA), which became effective on January 1 of the same year.

Covered employers have three options when it comes to getting copies of the posters:

  1. Download, print and post the November 2009 revised version of the full poster at no charge;
  2. Download, print and post the new poster supplement alongside the EEOC's September 2002 or the OFCCP's August 2008 poster at no charge; or
  3. Order ten or more printed copies of the poster from the EEOC Clearinghouse.

Spanish, Chinese and Arabic versions of the new poster are also available for order from the EEOC Clearinghouse.  Employers that are covered by federal nondiscrimination laws, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, must display the poster in a conspicuous place on their premises where notices to employees and applicants are typically posted. 

Although it is not required by the EEOC, employers should also consider updating their employee handbooks to reflect these changes in the law. 

For a concise listing of information and resources on the EEOC, the ADAAA, and GINA, visit the "EEO" section of AGC's Labor and HR Topical Resources page.


Pandemic Flu Prompts EEOC to Issue Guidance for Employers on ADA

With President Obama declaring a national emergency in response to the H1N1 influenza, commonly referred to as "Swine Flu," many government entities have encouraged employers to create their own plans for helping to prevent the spread of such an outbreak in workplaces across America, while ensuring continued business operations.  The latest government entity to issue such guidance is the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which wants to ensure that Americans with disabilities and workers with a different national origin are not discriminated against during the flu-prevention process.

With President Obama declaring a national emergency in response to the H1N1 influenza, commonly referred to as "Swine Flu," many government entities have encouraged employers to create their own plans for helping to prevent the spread of such an outbreak in workplaces across America, while ensuring continued business operations.  The latest government entity to issue such guidance is the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which wants to ensure that Americans with disabilities and workers with a different national origin are not discriminated against during the flu-prevention process.

Although the EEOC Guidance on Pandemic Preparedness in the Workplace is not legally binding for employers, it sheds light on how the EEOC will interpret the regulations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) during investigations of ADA violations and other claims of discrimination.  For example, the guidance explains how the EEOC will interpret a "direct threat," a "reasonable accommodation," an "undue hardship," a "disability-related inquiry" and a "medical exam" when evaluating employer practices during or preparing for a crippling outbreak.  The guidance also states that directions from the World Health Organization (WHO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), or other objective health organizations would determine the necessary precautionary measures to be taken due to the severity of the pandemic, and the EEOC guidance may then be modified accordingly.

The EEOC acknowledges that many employers have expressed concern about when to ask specific, personal questions of employees in response to preparing for a possible pandemic outbreak and have addressed these questions in the guidance, resulting in a list of employer practices that are permissible, depending on the severity of the outbreak at that particular time.  For example, before a pandemic, employers may ask questions that are non disability-related, such as if the employee will not be available, for any reason, to work during a pandemic outbreak, without requiring the employee to specify his or her reason for not being available, such as childcare or transportation issues, in order to help employers gauge the availability of their workforce during an outbreak for planning purposes.   Also, during a pandemic, employers may send home employees who are exhibiting flu-like symptoms, but they are not permitted to take the temperature of such employees to see if they have a fever, as this would qualify as a "medical exam" under the ADA.  The EEOC again states that although these are rules set forth right now, they may change depending on the severity of the outbreak and specific guidance issued by a federal, state or local health authority.

Construction employers are aware of the problems that a pandemic influenza outbreak can have on the productivity of the workforce including increased absenteeism that may cause an interruption in construction projects.  That is why it is important for employers to create workplace policies and procedures now that are available to the entire workforce, including workers with disabilities. 

For workplace resources and checklists on preventing the spread of influenza in the workplace, review the CDC's Communication Toolkit for Businesses and Employers as well as OSHA's Flu Pandemic Guide.


AGC Represented at DHS Symposium Where ICE Announces New E-Verify Campaign & Additional I-9 Audits

On November 19, 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) along with two agencies housed under its umbrella, Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), hosted a workforce symposium in Washington, D.C., which  AGC attended along with approximately 200 of the nation's top immigration lawyers, employer associations, and a handful of employers.  With high-ranking DHS officials in attendance, including Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, ICE Assistant Secretary John Morton, and USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas, the symposium was designed to increase the dialogue between DHS and employers across the country.

On November 19, 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) along with two agencies housed under its umbrella, Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), hosted a workforce symposium in Washington, D.C., which  AGC attended along with approximately 200 of the nation's top immigration lawyers, employer associations, and a handful of employers.  With high-ranking DHS officials in attendance, including Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, ICE Assistant Secretary John Morton, and USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas, the symposium was designed to increase the dialogue between DHS and employers across the country.

The platform for the day's events was used to launch the new DHS "I E-Verify" campaign, a series of public service announcements and worksite publicity resources to publicly recognize the approximately 170,000 businesses that use USCIS's Internet-based employment verification system, E-Verify.  "The 'I E-Verify' program will let consumers know which businesses are working hard to follow the law and are committed to protecting employment opportunities," said Secretary Napolitano.  According to DHS, more than 7.9 million queries have been run though the system since January 2009, with an average of 2000 new federal contractor registrants per week since federal contractor use of E-Verify became mandatory in September 2009.

While the morning was spent discussing E-Verify and the concerns of using it, most of the afternoon was spent discussing ICE's enforcement initiatives after a mid-day announcement that "today, ICE is issuing 1,000 Notices of Inspections (NOIs) to employers associated with critical infrastructure."  The NOIs mean that ICE will be auditing each of the employers' hiring records, specifically Form I-9s, to determine employment eligibility compliance.  According to ICE, the notices were sent to companies as a result of investigative leads and intelligence, and is the first step to ensuring the safety of the nation with regard to employing illegal workers in connection with public safety and infrastructure.  This is the second round  of I-9 audits issued this year alone, following 652 notices served just four months earlier, of which approximately half of the businesses served were found to be in compliance, according to DHS.  Of the remaining businesses served, approximately $2 million in fines have been assessed so far, specifically for substantive, criminal violations.  The names of the companies served in both audits were not released.

Although these fines were issued for more severe violations than just erroneous mistakes, it is important for employers to be prepared for possible I-9 audits and investigations by ensuring full compliance with I-9 recordkeeping requirements, specifically by performing regular in-house audits and training staff who administer I-9 forms and enter employee data into the E-Verify system.

For additional, background information on the first round of ICE audits, including links to official documents regarding the government's intent to crack down on employers hiring illegal workers, read AGC's article Federal Government Makes Employers Subject of Immigration Enforcement with I-9 and E-Verify Audits. 

*Note: Please visit the AGC Bookstore to purchase an MP3 download of "Immigration Compliance for the Construction Industry" presented by attorney David Whitlock of Elarbee Thompson, recorded live on October 29, 2009, at AGC's HR Professionals Conference in Atlanta, GA.  All purchases will include a 25-page guide entitled "I-9 Compliance Guidelines" presented by Elarbee Thompson's Immigration Practice Group and a copy of the PowerPoint presentation delivered during the live session.


DHS Rescinds No-Match Rule

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has issued a final rule rescinding the so-called "No-Match rule" first issued in August 2007 and supplemented in October 2008.  The final rule is the same as the proposed rule issued in August 2009.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has issued a final rule rescinding the so-called "No-Match rule" first issued in August 2007 and supplemented in October 2008.  The final rule is the same as the proposed rule issued in August 2009.

The rescinded rule addressed the legal obligations of an employer upon receipt of a "no-match letter," which is a letter from SSA informing an employer that employee Social Security Numbers submitted on employer W-2 forms do not match SSA records or a letter from DHS informing the employer of a discrepancy calling into question an employee's work authorization.  The rescinded rule set forth a "safe-harbor" process for an employer to follow in order to avoid a finding that its receipt of such a letter gave it constructive knowledge of a worker's illegal status.  The rule was never implemented, however, because a legal challenge brought by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, AFL-CIO, and others led to a preliminary injunction that was still in force when DHS rescinded the rule on October 7.  The lawsuit is now moot and will likely be dismissed after the rescission takes effect on November 6. 

According to the October 7 rule, DHS "has not changed its position as to the merits of the  2007 and 2008 rules" but has "decided to focus on more universal means of encouraging employer compliance than the narrowly focused and reactive process of granting a safe harbor for following specific steps in response to a no-match letter."  DHS reminded employers:

Receipt of a No-Match letter, when considered with other probative evidence, is a factor that may be considered in the totality of the circumstances and may in certain situations support a finding of "constructive knowledge."  A reasonable employer would be prudent, upon receipt of a No-Match letter, to check their own records for errors, inform the employee of the no-match letter, and ask the employee to review the information.  Employers would be prudent also to allow employees a reasonable period of time to resolve the no-match with SSA.

DHS also reminded employers that terminating of an employee referenced in a no-match letter without first attempting to resolve the mismatch, or treating an employee differently based on national origin or perceived citizenship status, may be unlawful discrimination under the anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act.  DHS advised:

Employers should not use No-Match letters, without more, as a basis for firing employees without resolution of the mis-match, and DHS has never countenanced such a practice. DHS urges employers, employees, and other interested parties to contact the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices, (800) 255-8155 or http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/osc/, for additional information and guidance about the application of the anti-discrimination provisions.

DHS did not say whether it plans to issue further guidance on how employers should respond to a no-match letter.  AGC will monitor any developments in that area.  AGC will monitor and report on any developments.  Meanwhile, employers that receive a no-match letter are advised to carefully follow the instructions provided in the letter, to take prompt actions -- similar to those set forth in the safe-harbor process -- that would demonstrate the employer's good-faith effort to resolve the mismatch and avoid the employment of unauthorized workers, and to seek the advice of legal counsel as needed.  For more information on the safe-harbor process and on other steps that employers can take to protect themselves, click here.


Employers Must Update FMLA Policies and Procedures Again

On October 28, 2009, President Obama signed into law the 2010 National Defense Authorization Act (2010 NDAA), which expands the recently-enacted exigency and caregiver leave provisions for military families under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).  The law took effect immediately.

On October 28, 2009, President Obama signed into law the 2010 National Defense Authorization Act (2010 NDAA), which expands the recently-enacted exigency and caregiver leave provisions for military families under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).  The law took effect immediately.

Just last year, Congress amended the FMLA to provide exigency leave of up to 12 weeks for family members of the National Guard and reservists who are called to active duty in support of a "contingency" or emergency military operation without being given much notice.  The 2010 NDAA extends this benefit to family members of any regular component of the Armed Forces, and removes the requirement that it be in support of an emergency military operation.  Qualified exigencies include deployment to a foreign country, short-notice deployment, military events and related activities, certain childcare and related activities, financial and legal arrangements, counseling, rest and recuperation, and post-deployment activities.

The FMLA, which applies to employers with 50 or more employees, already allows eligible employees to take up to 26 weeks of military "caregiver leave" in a single 12-month period to care for a service member who has a serious illness or injury that was incurred in the line of duty while on active duty.  Previously, military caregiver leave was only available to the family members of active-duty service members.  The new law now includes veterans, or one who "was a member of the Armed Forces (including a member of the National Guard or Reserves) at any time during the five years preceding the date on which the veteran undergoes... medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy."  Additionally, "serious injury or illness" now includes:

  1. An injury or illness incurred in the line of duty during active duty, and
  2. An injury or illness that existed before the member's active duty that was aggravated by service in the line of duty.

With many service members returning home with conditions like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), these amendments allow additional time for diagnosing a condition such as PTSD, for which a service member may not display symptoms and be diagnosed until after he or she becomes a veteran.  Now, family members will be eligible for FMLA to care for these men and women.

Although the effective date of the law is unclear and the U.S. Department of Labor has not yet issued new regulations, certification forms, or other FMLA-related forms to comply with the law's new definitions, employers are well-advised to take steps to achieve compliance now by revising company FMLA policies and forms to include the new information and by informing FMLA leave administrators of the changes.


2009 Open-Shop Craft Wage Increases Expected to be Lowest in Over 15 Years

Open-shop contractors planning to provide raises to skilled craft workers in 2009 expect to raise wages by an average of 2.88 percent, according to the latest Merit Shop Craft Survey report issued by PAS, Inc.  When data from contractors not planning raises are included, the overall anticipated increase averages only 1.96 percent.  This compares to actual increases of 4.1 percent (excluding zero-increases) and 3.7 percent (including zero-increases) in 2008, and represents the lowest average increases seen in over 15 years.  Based on historical experience and other factors, however, PAS projects that increases will actually end up in the range of 2.3-2.8 percent nationally, and even higher in a few high-demand areas.  Although the demand for skilled trades has been limited in most areas of the country so far this year, high demand continues in pockets of the Gulf Coast and Midwest regions, PAS found.

Open-shop contractors planning to provide raises to skilled craft workers in 2009 expect to raise wages by an average of 2.88 percent, according to the latest Merit Shop Craft Survey report issued by PAS, Inc.  When data from contractors not planning raises are included, the overall anticipated increase averages only 1.96 percent.  This compares to actual increases of 4.1 percent (excluding zero-increases) and 3.7 percent (including zero-increases) in 2008, and represents the lowest average increases seen in over 15 years.  Based on historical experience and other factors, however, PAS projects that increases will actually end up in the range of 2.3-2.8 percent nationally, and even higher in a few high-demand areas.  Although the demand for skilled trades has been limited in most areas of the country so far this year, high demand continues in pockets of the Gulf Coast and Midwest regions, PAS found.

PAS found the following average anticipated increases in benchmark locations:

State

Zero-Increases Excluded

Zero-Increases Included

Alabama

  3.0%

  2.6%

Arkansas

2.38

1.95

Georgia

2.8

2.2

Kansas

2.9

2.3

Kentucky

3.06

1.13

Louisiana

3.0

2.4

Massachusetts

3.58

1.16

Minnesota

3.12

0.93

Oregon

3.0

2.2

PAS further reports the following hourly wage rates for all crafts combined and for certain benchmark positions:

Position

2009

2008

1999

All Crafts

$19.77

$19.61

$14.61

Carpenters

19.67

 19.60

15.35

General Laborers

14.43

14.11

10.90

Electricians

23.31

19.60

16.73

Pipefitters

23.14

23.30

16.23

Plumbers

22.24

21.70

16.73

"The buying power of construction workers has risen continuously since 1990," observes PAS in the September 2009 issue of its Contractor Compensation Quarterly.  While at times last year it seemed that inflation would seriously impact the buying power of the dollar and end the 17-year rise in craft workers' standard of living, that changed by year end, as the CPI flattened out from 5.5 percent in June 2008 to 0.1 percent by year end for an annualized rate.  "Though the streak continues, pay close attention to our industry economists and any predications they may make on future prices," cautioned PAS.  The drop in energy costs from 2008 to 2009 accounts for the virtually flat or declining CPI, says PAS.  When energy costs are eliminated from the equation, the CPI continues to rise.

The full survey report - which covers fringe benefit and other information, and which reports data broken down data by type of construction, geographic location, company size, and other characteristics - is available for purchase from PAS.  AGC members that participated in the survey receive a substantial discount on the reports.  For more information on PAS reports, visit www.pas1.com or call (734) 429-1199.


DOL Cancels Manchester Job Corps Center Project Solicitation Amid PLA Concerns Raised by AGC

The Department of Labor canceled the Manchester New Hampshire Job Corps Center construction solicitation due to concerns surrounding a project labor agreement (PLA) requirement.

The Department of Labor canceled the Manchester New Hampshire Job Corps Center construction solicitation due to concerns surrounding a project labor agreement (PLA) requirement.

In September, AGC of America, in cooperation with AGC of  New Hampshire, sent a letter to the Department of Labor expressing concerns about the agency's decision to include a PLA mandate in solicitations related to the construction of a new Job Corps Center in Manchester, N.H., and demanding information about the agency's justification and decision-making process. Read more here.

DOL today announced that the solicitation was cancelled because it believes that “it is in the public interest for the Department to further evaluate the issues involved in the PLA requirement” as it is a new issue to DOL.

AGC is also trying to stay informed about federal agency PLA activity.  If your chapter becomes aware of any PLA mandates on federal or federally assisted construction projects, please send information to Marco Giamberardino at giamberm@agc.org.


AGC Holds Northwest Regional Meeting with Carpenters and Operating Engineers

AGC held a regional meeting with the National Construction Alliance II (NCAII) on October 2 in Seattle, WA.  Members and chapter staff from collective bargaining chapters in the Northwest attended, along with International Union of Operating Engineers General President Vince Giblin, United Brotherhood of Carpenters General President Doug McCarron, Union Contractors Committee Chairman Jim Clemens, AGC Union Contractors Committee Staff Associate Denise Gold, NCAII Executive Vice President Ray Poupore, and other leaders from NCAII, the Operating Engineers, and the Carpenters.

AGC held a regional meeting with the National Construction Alliance II (NCAII) on October 2 in Seattle, WA.  Members and chapter staff from collective bargaining chapters in the Northwest attended, along with International Union of Operating Engineers General President Vince Giblin, United Brotherhood of Carpenters General President Doug McCarron, Union Contractors Committee Chairman Jim Clemens, AGC Union Contractors Committee Staff Associate Denise Gold, NCAII Executive Vice President Ray Poupore, and other leaders from NCAII, the Operating Engineers, and the Carpenters.

The meeting was AGC's third regional meeting with NCAII.  The meetings, which just began in May of this year, are intended to provide AGC chapters with an opportunity to communicate directly with union leaders about contractors' local and regional concerns directly and to engage in a dialogue to solve problems together.  NCAII is a partnership of the Carpenters and Operating Engineers internationals.  It is the successor to the NCA, which also included the Laborers, until they dropped out of the alliance last year and rejoined the Building and Construction Trades Department of the AFL-CIO (Building Trades). 

NCAII recently launched the Northwest NCA Council (NWNCA), NCAII's first regional affiliate.  "The NWNCA will work together with our AGC partners in the Northwest to ensure a strong, productive working relationship and a healthy, growing construction industry," Poupore stated.  "We believe in a cooperative approach to our common issues facing us and will seek new ways to partner on safety, training, workforce development and political action to name a few.   The NWNCA seeks to promote harmonious labor relations that will promote stability and common sense enabling contractors to be successful and our members to earn a good living for themselves and their families.  The old model no longer works, it is time for a new approach for a new day."

Other labor leaders at the meeting made similar statements about a "new era" of labor-management cooperation and communication, an era in which the general presidents are "not as hands-off" regarding local issues.  As stated in the first two AGC-NCAII regional meetings, the general presidents expressed interest in hearing about significant local problems in a timely manner - even encouraging contractors to call them directly at their DC headquarters.  They also spoke of cooperation to help signatory contractors be more competitive on large projects where concessions are needed, citing the second phase of work on the Route 52 causeway in New Jersey as a successful example of such efforts.

NCAII distributed copies of its own Heavy & Highway Construction Project Agreement, explaining that it is essentially the same as the National Heavy and Highway Coalition's agreement, except that it does not require contractors to contribute to the labor-management trust, and explaining that local negotiations are conducted to establish a site-specific addendum for each job.  When a contractor expressed concern about the agreement working without other crafts' participation, Poupore said that NCAII will negotiate an agreement that is parallel to the Building Trades' agreement so that terms will be consistent across all crafts on the job.

Participants expressed discontent with owners that adopt the Building Trades' unilateral project labor agreement without giving contractors a chance to negotiate over the terms.  They discussed the need for AGC and NCAII to visit owners together in order to give them an alternative option.  Similarly, when contractors in Oregon lamented their inability to compete in the current market, given that some contractors desperate for work are cutting costs and underbidding them by violating prevailing wage and workers compensation laws, labor leaders suggested joint visits to county officials and state attorneys general.  NWNCA and local contractors should work out a way to lobby together on issues of common interest, they said.

The meeting also included a discussion of other specific, local concerns, such as a contentious dispute between the Operating Engineers and Laborers over representation of concrete pumpers in Washington state and general contractors' need for a carpenter helper classification in Oregon.

The meeting is likely to be the last of its kind in 2009.  No further regional meetings are presently scheduled, but they are likely to resume in 2010.  If your chapter or region of chapters would like to have such a meeting in your area, please contact Denise Gold, AGC Associate General Counsel, at goldd@agc.org or (703) 837-5326.


HR and Training & Development Conference Helps Industry

AGC recently held its joint 2009 HR Professionals and Training & Development Conference in Atlanta. More than 175 people attended to learn, share best practices, network and take home practical solutions to HR and training problems. 

AGC recently held its joint 2009 HR Professionals and Training & Development Conference in Atlanta. More than 175 people attended to learn, share best practices, network and take home practical solutions to HR and training problems.

 
Attorney Bert Brannan addresses conference attendees during an employment law workshop.


Training & Development Professionals participating in an interactive “game-based learning” session.


The two-day event included more than two dozen speakers and a wide variety of topics. Some sessions were designed to appeal more to construction HR professionals, such as "How HR Moves from the Break Room to the Board Room," "Using Social Media Campaigns & Web 2.0 for Recruiting & Employee Engagement," "Construction Compensation Strategies in a Challenging Economy," and "Immigration Compliance for the Construction Industry."  Other sessions were designed for the training and development professional, including "Educating through Entertainment with Game-based Learning," "Facilitating Building Information Modeling," "Managing your Training through an LMS," "Integrating Experiential Learning into Traditional Instructor-Led Training," and "Delivering Training Value Using the Kirkpatrick Four Levels."

All attendees were able to enjoy, participate in, and learn from Barbara Sanfilippo's keynote address on "How to Engage Staff, Motivate Managers and Enjoy Life in Turbulent Times." Sanfilippo, an enthusiastic and energetic speaker, is head of the San Diego firm High Definition People. Her 90-minute presentation and breakout session, "A Roadmap to Inspire Passion and Performance," helped attendees discover proven principles to engage employees, determine ways to increase personal responsibility, and find a success-oriented mindset regardless of circumstances.

AGC would like to thank the conference's Platinum Sponsor, the National Center for Construction Education & Research  and our Silver Sponsors, PAS, Inc., FMI, RedVector.com, Inc., Learn.com, PEOple OneSource, and HireTouch. Sponsors are key to the success of these conferences, and their support is truly appreciated.

AGC is currently working to select the location and dates for the 2010 HR Professionals and Training & Development Conferences, so stay tuned for details and plan to attend next year!

*Note: Please visit the AGC Bookstore to purchase an MP3 download of the live recording of the conference session "Immigration Compliance for the Construction Industry" presented by attorney David Whitlock of Elarbee Thompson.  All purchases will include a 25-page guide entitled "I-9 Compliance Guidelines" presented by Elarbee Thompson's Immigration Practice Group and a copy of the PowerPoint presentation delivered during the live session.


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