Vol. XXIX, No. 4
Fall 2017
Text Only Version
In This Issue
Regular Features
Editor's Note
President's Message
FAQ
Why is Juvenile Polygraph Not Recommended by ATSA?
Featured Articles
Responding to Problematic Technology Use:
Creating a Therapeutic Toolbox
Looking After Ourselves and Each Other
Utilizing Recreation Therapy as Part of the Treatment Model
Understanding and Preventing Adolescent Pedophilia TEDMED Talk
Step One of Cultural Competency Addressing Privilege & Power
Students' Voice
Assessment of Deviant Preferences Using Novel Behavioral Assessment Procedures
A Studentís Guide to the ATSA 2017 Conference
Book Review
RNR Principles in Practice In the Management and Treatment of Sexual Abusers
ATSA News
2017 ATSA Conference Events
Preventing Harmful Sexual Behaviors in Youth: An Infographic from the ATSA Prevention Committee
Welcome Incoming Board Members
2017 ATSA Awards
ATSA Professional Code of Ethics 2017 Revisions and Additions
New ATSA Members
Newsletter Tools
Search Past Issues
Print-Friendly Issue
Print-Friendly Article
Forum Team
David Prescott
Book Review Editor

Sarah Gorter
Production Editor

Forum Editor
Contact the editor or submit articles to:

Heather M. Moulden, Ph.D.
Forensic Program
St. Joseph's Healthcare
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
E: hmoulden@stjoes.ca
P: (905) 522-1155 ext. 35539
Step One of Cultural Competency Addressing Privilege & Power
Cordelia Anderson

Note to readers: This article by Cordelia builds upon and adds to the blog post by Kieran McCartan and David Prescott, “Race, culture, community & abuse”.


A related event, "Dismantling Racism: The Relevance to Prevention," will be held at this year's ATSA Conference on Thursday, October 26, 2017 from 5:30 to 6:30 pm at the Sheraton Kansas City Hotel at Crown Center, in Kansas City, Missouri. If you are in the area, we welcome you to attend the event and join the conversation.


 

Child sexual abuse, sexual violence and pornography are not easy topics to talk about, but in my experience raising questions related to power, privilege and race are even tougher. Just like trying to talk about “sex offenders”, invitations to talk about such difficult topics often results in defensive, protective, ambivalent, or even angry responses. Most organizations who work with victims and survivors are raising these difficult questions. In fact, most of my thinking related to power, privilege and what’s all involved in cultural competency,  I have learned from and with those who work with survivors/victims, and with those who work on social justice as part of prevention.  

However, I wonder how the sensitive but pervasive issues related to our own sense of power, race, class, and disabilities translate into the work of treating and researching those who sexually offend. As a member of the ATSA Prevention Committee, I am hoping our entire organization will grapple with how this all fits within the priorities and engage in these discussions. I am writing this blog as an invitation to further conversations and perhaps more attention to this in your practice, your research and in discussions at our conferences.

Questions to consider include:

  • Are White/Caucasian professionals sensitive to the unique experiences of clients who are people of color? Or, what it is like for professionals in the field who are people of color who work in dominantly White organizations?

  • Do White/Caucasian professionals recognize limits to their understanding of ways clients of color experience prejudices across settings, including in our own offices?

  • Do we as White/Caucasian professional spend time reflecting on our own power and privilege and how this influences the personal and professional decisions we make?

We know that sexual abuse thrives in secrecy and shame. For years, our organization and our practices might have reflected the isolation of the very issue we have been working on. More recently, we have begun to also understand the need for increasing cultural competency. However, if we expand our vision even further, we will see that there are tensions between the focus on cultural competency versus racial justice. At the core of that difference is our need to not only learn more about the individuals we work with but to begin to address our individual and collective privileges as professionals that do this work. We have made a commitment to healing and to minimize the harm that has been done. But what if we are also, unintentionally increasing the harm? 

Therapists and advocates appreciate the importance of dealing with the whole person, their family and community of support to address the presenting problem or issue. Those who do prevention work know the importance of expanding that view even further to also address the environment and social norms that create families, communities, organizations and societies where harm is likely to develop and continue. 

The issues we work with are complex enough that the tendency is to say we cannot afford to further muddy the waters by addressing race, power and privilege. Or we may say that there are more pressing issues in the work we do in terms of community safety. 

I’ve been at this work for over 40 years and in the time I have left, I hope to engage in meaningful conversations with colleagues and organizations that I care deeply about in ways that address the intersections of these issues. I believe the first step toward cultural competency and a social justice framework is to more fully and intentionally face my white privilege and the norms of institutional and systemic white supremacy. It is not comfortable to talk about or easy work to do but it is essential. One example of the work in this area that’s underway is the 2018 theme of the MASOC/MATSA’s conference which is cultural competency. 

Since first writing this blog in May, and then holding off on submitting it until closer to the ATSA conference, there has been so much happening in this country and around the world that raises the urgency of engaging in these discussions and taking appropriate action. With such challenging issues, it can be helpful to consider actions we can actually take. We can:

  • Commit to meaningful – though often uncomfortable – conversations about our own privilege and power.
  • Commit to on-going learning about how such power and privilege affects the effectiveness of our work and quality of our relationships.
  • Intentionally address power and privilege when creating goals for our own work and the goals of our clients.

I am writing with great humility about my own limitations related to all of this. I know likely I have I stepped in it in one way or another. Still, I believe the risk is worth it to get more meaningful conversations on this topic going and to revisit ATSA’s role. I believe it is an opportune time for ATSA to do even more with these conversations and related actions. The ATSA Prevention Committee is hosting a panel related to how these issues fit with prevention. It will be on Thursday, October, 26, from 5-6. We hope you can attend, read some of the writings below and/or find other ways to engage further in this work.

 

For those interested in this topic these readings may be of interest:

Hard Conversations: An Introduction to Racism http://www.37days.com/racism/

Say the Wrong Thing: Stories and Strategies for Racial Justice and Authentic Community, by Dr. Amanda Kemp, Lisa Graustein, June 16, 2016,

The Audrey Lorde Project www.alp.org;

“White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Backpack,” by Peggy McIntosh, http://code.ucsd.edu/pcosman/Backpack.pdf;

“Why I Left My White Therapist”, Chaya Babu, 1/18/17 https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article/d7pa5j/why-i-left-my-white-therapist

 


 

This article was adapted from a post on the ATSA Blog. View the original post.

Read the related blog post “Race, Culture, Community & Abuse” by Kieran McCartan and David Prescott.

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