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IEEE - Job Site
10 August 2016
Your bi-weekly report on jobs, education, management, and the engineering workplace, from the editors of IEEE Spectrum.
1. Ten Signs That a Company Might Be a Bad Place to Work

There is a good reason that career experts tell job hunters to investigate a company in much the same way that a hiring manager will dig into your background. You want to make sure that you and the firm are a good fit and that you’re not signing up for a tour in employment hell. A Washington Post article tells job seekers what to avoid, including places that, like Major League Baseball before the advent of free agency, give managers complete control over whether employees can avail themselves of internal transfer and promotion opportunities. Another issue to find out about beforehand is whether the company has implemented a performance management program that turns professionals into piece workers. Says the article: “Performance Management is the name of a popular HR hoax and scam that turns any job into a series of tasks and goals that you’ll be held accountable for on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. No job worth doing breaks down into tiny, measurable parts.”  Read more.

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2. Massachusetts Law Bans Employers From Asking About Salary History
Good move, Massachusetts. The value of an employee to Company B shouldn’t be based on his or her value to Company A.  Read more.
3. How to Land a Job When a Company "Isn't Hiring"

A Forbes article offers three bits of advice. Step 1: Do your research. Step 2: Present yourself as someone who is uniquely qualified to  “add value, fill a need [especially one the company’s leadership didn’t know it had], and help the company.” For the final step, click here. 

4. Hiring Rebound in India's IT sector Triggered by Online Jobs

Hiring in the Indian IT sector, which had recently been stagnant, surged 51 percent in July.  Read more.

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