The Monthly Newsletter of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society—October 2017

 

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Connected Vehicles
Continued Dispute on Preferred Vehicle-to-Vehicle Technologies
Elisabeth Uhlemann

As reported in the June issue of IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Department of Transportation has issued a proposed rule, “The Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS); Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) Communications,” that would require auto-makers to include V2V technologies in all new light-duty vehicles. 

The proposed rule was open for public comments until 12 April and received several replies, which were most notably from four different stakeholders, reflecting the still-ongoing heated debate about sharing the intelligent transport systems (ITS) frequency band in the United States.

The Safety Spectrum Coalition members [the American Trucking Associations, American Automobile Association (AAA), the Association of Global Automakers, the Intelligent Transportation Society of America, and the National Safety Council] strongly support the proposed rule establishing an FMVSS, requiring V2V capability through dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) technology in cars and light trucks.

The Safety Spectrum Coalition, which represents a group of industries—highway users, transportation technology, consumer, and safety advocates—seeks to ensure that the 5.9-GHz safety spectrum band remains available for the full deployment of DSRC technology.

The Safety Spectrum Coalition states that it believes the proposed rule provides the regulatory framework and certainty necessary to drive not only substantial and rapid light-duty fleet deployment of V2V technology, but also to spur innovation, competition, and deployment in the aftermarket and infrastructure industries. However, it also states that DSRC technology will create a new wireless transportation application ecosystem through all seven channels in the 5.9-GHz band.

The Safety Spectrum Coalition further states that it strongly favors using channel 172 to support V2V basic safety message transmissions and, therefore, sent a letter to the U.S. Federal Communication Commission (FCC) to promote the release of the notice of proposed rulemaking on connected vehicle technology and to ask the FCC to protect the 5.9-GHz safety spectrum and not delay the deployment of V2V technology. 

The Safety Spectrum Coalition states that it supports efforts under way to test spectrum sharing to determine if unlicensed devices such as Wi-Fi can safely share the 5.9-GHz band with DSRC operations.

However, the coalition states that it firmly believes that any potential sharing plan should work around DSRC operations in the band and not slow DSRC deployment. It concludes that any sharing arrangements that would require rechanneling the band would hold up the implementation of DSRC and the establishment of safety protocols, effectively relegating vehicle safety to a secondary concern.

The coalition therefore urged NHTSA to remain engaged with the FCC at what they call a critical juncture to ensure that the safety benefits of DSRC can be realized.

ITS America commented on the proposed rule that it believes an FMVSS is needed for V2V communications and that the proposed standard should be performance based and flexible enough to incorporate future technologies, including everything from standards for communications to security and privacy for V2V applications. 

ITS America believes that DSRC-based standards and technology are currently the most technically mature and widely accepted “cooperative” short-range approach for crash avoidance and vehicle automation. 

ITS America thus urges NHTSA to move carefully to ensure that any standard is flexible enough to allow other wireless technologies to be incorporated under the federal standard as long as they can demonstrate a minimal combined performance for interoperability, security, and privacy. 

Finally, ITS America agrees with NHTSA that devices participating in the V2V information environment need to exchange safety information but urges that choice of channels should be left to industry within the constraints of the current FCC technical and service rules.

Full article: IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine, Volume 12, Number 3, September 2017

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In This Issue
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Society
Message from the EiC
VTS Awards for 2017 (for presentation at VTC2017-Fall and VPPC 2017)
IEEE VTC2017-Fall Conference Best Paper Awards
VTS Chapter Profile IEEE Malaysia ComSoc/VTS Joint Chapter
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From the IEEE VTS Resource Center
Lectures on Energetic Efficiency of Connected Vehicles, and Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Fundamentals
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From IEEE Vehicular Technology Magazine
Review: Unmanned-Aerial-Vehicular Networks for Small and Mini Drones
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Connected Vehicles
Continued Dispute on Preferred Vehicle-to-Vehicle Technologies
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Mobile Radio
Fifth-Generation Technology Offers Trillion-Dollar Business Opportunities
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Transportation Systems
Bay Area Rapid Transit Extension South on the East Bay
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Conference Preview
IEEE VPPC 2017
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Conference Call
IEEE VTC2018-Spring in Porto
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Editor-in-Chief

Abbas Jamalipour

 
 
 
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