Maine Medicine Weekly Update - 05/29/2018  (Plain Text Version)

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In this issue:
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
•  Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Community Health Options to Continue Participation in ACA Marketplace
•  Wording Proposed by Secretary of State for Home Health Referendum
•  MMA Past President Dr. Charles Pattavina Testifies to U.S. Senate Committee
•  CMS Releases SIM Report
•  Shaun Alfreds Appointed as Head of HealthInfoNet
•  Update Will Change Buprenorphine MME Display in Most State PMPs
•  Int’l Mediterranean Diet Month: Making the Case for a Healthy Diet as a Tool for Diabetes Prevention
•  New Interactive Online Course Ups Physicians’ Nutrition Knowledge, Supports Patients in Diabetes Prevention
128th MAINE LEGISLATURE
•  Legislative Report: Appropriations Committee Meets May 30th
UPCOMING EVENTS
•  One River, One Ocean: June 2-14, 2018
•  HPV Summit in Brewer June 7th
•  Wednesday, June 13 in Augusta: Next Steps in Addressing Maine's Opioid Crisis
•  X Waiver Course in Waterville June 16th
•  MCMI Training Programs - Level 1 and Level 2 - June 22
•  New Free CME on Alzheimer's Risk, Detection, and Management
•  Peer Navigation Program from Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered (FORCE)
•  Online Learning Opportunities Offering CME Credits - from the Northern New England Practice Transformation Network
•  Northern New England Society of Addiction Medicine 2018 Annual Conference & Meeting - Nov 2-3
HEALTHCARE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
•  Behavioral Health Consultant
•  Internal Medicine Outpatient Physician Opportunity
•  Ob/Gyn Physician Opportunity
•  Outpatient Internal Medicine Physician – Bangor, Maine
•  Family Practice Physician - Bucksport Regional Health Center
•  Relocate to Beautiful Southwestern Maine - Medical Director/Family Practice Physician
•  Psychiatry Faculty, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
•  Psychiatric Medical Director
•  Maine's Largest FQHC in need of Physician for Geriatric Program
•  Multiple Family Med Opportunities in Beloved Community Health Centers
•  Outpatient Only - Internal Medicine with Loan Repayment & Sign-on Bonus
•  Internal Medicine Outpatient Physician
•  Clinical Cardiology Opportunity
•  Opportunities at the VA for Volunteer Physicians

 

Int’l Mediterranean Diet Month: Making the Case for a Healthy Diet as a Tool for Diabetes Prevention

Your patients have been made well aware through such things as social media, family, friends and marketing that a healthy diet can contribute to significant improvements in health. Several studies have also revealed that healthy diets can not only prevent type 2 diabetes, but can also improve cholesterol levels, reduce hypertension and decrease heart disease. 

 

Your patients have been made well aware through such things as social media, family, friends and marketing that a healthy diet can contribute to significant improvements in health. Several studies have also revealed that healthy diets can not only prevent type 2 diabetes, but can also improve cholesterol levels, reduce hypertension and decrease heart disease.  

Yet the statistics indicate there’s still a disconnect for patients. More than 84 million U.S. people have prediabetes—that’s 1 in 3 adults—and 9 out of 10 people don’t know they have the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This May, International Mediterranean Diet Month, presents an opportunity to educate patients on the benefits of a healthy diet and how it can help reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes and other chronic disease.

Benefits of a Mediterranean Diet

The Mediterranean diet is a healthy approach to eating that people from countries around the Mediterranean practice. Key elements of the Mediterranean diet highlight eating mostly plant-based foods which include:

  • Fruits
  • Veggies
  • Nuts
  • Legumes
  • Whole grains

The diet does not limit fat consumption but instead encourages making better decisions when choosing what types of fats to eat. It does emphasize monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Healthy fats such as olive oil, for example are substituted for butter. Herbs and spices, which can promote health, replace salt as seasoning. The Mediterranean diet also encourages limiting red meat consumption to a few times a month, while eating fish and poultry twice weekly, drinking red wine in moderation and incorporating regular exercise.

Following a Mediterranean diet has been found to reduce heart attacks, strokes, and certain types of cancers. It can also lower LDL cholesterol, and may help in the prevention of other chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

Even if patients don’t practice the Mediterranean diet, a diet that incorporates more plant-based foods can prove beneficial.

Offering tips for nutrition

To help patients understand the positive impact that lifestyle changes such as eating more fruits and vegetables can have on their health, especially in the prevention of type 2 diabetes, it’s important that they be aware of their risk for prediabetes.

Screening your patients with the online prediabetes risk test allows you to perform additional blood tests and then refer your patients to a National Diabetes Prevention (DPP) lifestyle change program in their community or online. DPPs have been proven to empower patients to make lifestyle changes that become habits, including dietary improvements and increased physical activity in support of their health.

You can also start the conversation around healthy eating with the help of an online CME nutrition course offered by the American Medical Association in partnership with the Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology. The course will arm you with the information you need to talk with your patients about their nutrition needs.