Maine Medicine Weekly Update - 04/01/2019  (Plain Text Version)

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In this issue:
IN THE SPOTLIGHT
•  Defendant in Aroostook County Jail Should Remain on MAT, Court Says
•  CMS Urged to Adopt Better Cost Measures in MIPS
•  Northern Maine Medical Center Among Top 20 Rural Hospitals in US
•  Public Health Updates from the AMA
•  Governor Ends 24-month Prior Authorization Requirement for MAT
•  Webinar: Estate Planning 101 - Managing Risks to Your Wealth
•  Photos from Physicians' Day at the Legislature 2019
•  Boards Seek Comments on Proposed Rule for Office-based Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder
129th MAINE LEGISLATURE
•  MMA Legislative Call Tuesday, April 2nd
•  State House Highlights of the Week: HCIFS Committee Hears Bills on Insurance Coverage for Abortion, Prudent Layperson Standard, Lead
UPCOMING EVENTS
•  Upcoming Specialty Society Meetings
•  Motivational Interviewing and SBIRT - Sat 4/6 in Biddeford
•  NAMI Maine’s Beyond the Basics in Suicide Prevention Conference - Friday, April 12, 2019
•  22nd Maine Pain Symposium on May 1 8am-4:30pm at University of New England
HEALTHCARE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
•  BC/BE Family Medicine Physician or Experienced Family Nurse Practitioner
•  Physician for Maine Maritime Academy Summer Training Cruise
•  Internal Medicine Outpatient Physician
•  Mid Coast Maine - Adult Psychiatrist and/ Psychiatric NP/PA Opportunity
•  Family Medicine Opportunity in Beautiful Western Maine
•  PCHC in need of Pediatrician for Brand New Pediatric Center!
•  Medical Director - Maine Mobile Health Program
•  Board Certified Family Physician - Newport, RI
•  Psychiatric Mental Health NP - Leeds
•  Outpatient Internal Medicine Physician – Bangor, Maine
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
•  Opportunities at the VA for Volunteer Physicians
•  Volunteer Opportunity with Partners for World Health

 

Public Health Updates from the AMA

Click through for a brief update on recent public health issues, provided by the American Medical Association's electronic publication, Morning Rounds.

 

CAR-T therapy may be effective against some solid tumors, research suggests

The AP (3/31, Marchione) reports researchers found that CAR-T therapy “is showing early signs of promise against some solid tumors,” according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research conference. CAR-T therapy has been shown to be effective against certain blood cancers, but this latest research suggests it could also be effective against a wider range of cancers.

Most common triggers of atrial fibrillation are avoidable behaviors

Reuters (3/29, Mishra) reported, “The most common triggers of atrial fibrillation – an irregular heart rhythm that’s a leading cause of stroke – are avoidable behaviors like drinking alcohol or coffee,” research indicated. After surveying “1,295 patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AFib,” investigators “found the most common behaviors that triggered episodes of the arrhythmia were alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption and exercise.” The findings were published online in the journal Heart Rhythm.

Survey suggests younger patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed at later stages

CNN (3/30, Howard) reports on a study to be presented at a cancer research meeting, based on surveys of 1,195 colorectal cancer patients and survivors age 20 to 49, finding that “the majority of survey respondents, 57%, were diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 49; a third were diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 39; about 10% were diagnosed before age 30.” It also found that while “most colorectal cancer patients older than 50 are diagnosed in the early stages of disease,” most of those surveyed (71%) “said they were diagnosed at the advanced stages of 3 and 4.”



People with certain factors for heart disease may also be more likely to develop dementia

Reuters (3/29, Rapaport) reported, “People who have risk factors for heart disease like diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity may also be more likely to develop structural changes in the brain that can lead to dementia,” researchers concluded after having “examined data on 9,772 adults, ages 44 to 79, who all had at least one MRI brain scan and provided general health information and medical records for the analysis.” The findings were published online in the European Heart Journal.