Maine Medicine Weekly Update - April 16, 2021  (Plain Text Version)

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In this issue:
•  Maine Medical Association Statement on Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Pause
•  FDA Update & Statement on Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Pause Recommendation
•  Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia & J&J COVID Vaccine Response from the Manufacturer
•  Over 30 Percent of US Adults Fully Vaccinated, Maine Leads the Nation
•  Maine CDC COVID-19 Update for Clinicians with Stephen Sears, MD
•  Clinical Updates and Guidance Related to COVID-19
•  Medicare FFS Claims: 2% Payment Adjustment (Sequestration) Suspended Through December
•  MaineCare Updates: Upcoming Accountable Communities Public Webinar & Primary Care 2.0 Presentation Available Online
•  HealthCare Dive: Urgent Care Centers Draw Some ER Visits but Associated with Higher Spending Overall
•  Webinar for Medical Students April 22: So You Are Employed, Now What?
•  Next MMA Legislative Call Will Be Wednesday, April 21st
•  Maine Community Action Partnership is Working for a Successful Vaccine Roll Out for All
•  Maine Medical Association & ActionPPE Partner Again; This Time for FDA Approved Rapid Antigen Tests
•  A Message from Maine Responds: Volunteer Opportunity
MAINE LEGISLATURE
•  Maine Legislature Week 14 Update
•  Maine Legislature Public Hearings, Work Sessions & New Bills
UPCOMING EVENTS
•  Upcoming Specialty Society Meetings
•  Maine CDC Physicians To Host Regular Clinician COVID Vaccine Info Sessions
•  "Prescribing to Reduce Opioid Overdose Risk: How to Impact the Epidemic Within the Pandemic"
•  NAMI Maine Workshops in May & June: Suicide Prevention & Management for Clinical Staff
•  AAP EQIPP Course: Immunizations - Strategies for Success (for RURAL Health Providers)
•  New Maine AAP Educational Webinar Series
HEALTHCARE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
•  Nurse Practitioner
•  Executive Director
•  Medical Director - ME License Required
•  Practice Administrator
•  Physician
•  Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

 

HealthCare Dive: Urgent Care Centers Draw Some ER Visits but Associated with Higher Spending Overall

While urgent care centers do keep some lower-acuity patients from visiting costly emergency departments, their presence is not associated with a drop in total healthcare costs, according to a report in Health Affairs.

 

 · While urgent care centers do keep some lower-acuity patients from visiting costly emergency departments, their presence is not associated with a drop in total healthcare costs, according to a report in Health Affairs

· Using commercial claims and enrollment data from 2008 to 2019, researchers found an increase of 1,000 lower-acuity urgent care visits resulted in 27 fewer lower-acuity ER visits. The entry of a high-volume urgent care center into a ZIP code was associated with a 31% drop in emergency visits. 

· However, while ER trips were far more costly ($1,716 vs. $178), each $1,646 ER visit was offset by $6,327 more in urgent care costs because the number of urgent care visits per enrollee required to reduce one ER visit was 37. 

The full article can be found here.