View Mobile Version | View Web Version

SPONSORED BY
 
NADA.org
August 12, 2013 FacebookTwitterFlickrRSSSEND TO A FRIENDPRINT
nada.orgAdvocacyAffiliates | Convention | Jobs | Programs | Publications | Services | Training
Inside this issue
Editorial: Automakers and Suppliers Sink or Swim Together
Is EV Charging Technology the Next Challenge for the Electric Vehicle Industry?
Detroit's Devotion to the Car Paved Way For its Undoing
Fleet Flip-Flop: Detroit 3 Are Down; Asians Pick Up Slack
Sheehy Auto Stores Donates $162K to Susan G. Komen Foundation
Click here for more auto industry news at NADAFrontPage.com. .
Top Stories
Editorial: Automakers and Suppliers Sink or Swim Together

Relations between automakers and suppliers keep changing -- and mostly for the better. The original system, with the lowest bidders stamping out automaker designs, is long gone. The old confrontational approach has given way to greater cooperation. Indeed, the industry got through the spike in raw materials prices in the last decade because automakers helped some smaller suppliers buy crucial materials. And each side helped the other survive the Great Recession. Through successive waves of consolidation, suppliers have evolved. Today's parts makers are better designers and technology developers, able to function capably in multiple global markets. And, slowly, automakers have learned to cooperate more. They do better at protecting the proprietary knowledge of their suppliers, nurturing long-term relationships and considering quality and design excellence as well as the lowest cost.

While improved, relations between auto manufacturers and suppliers will never be perfect. After all, both want to maximize their own profitability. Major automakers still have more than a thousand suppliers. Even as Ford Motor Co. expands its preferred supplier program, it is suing a supplier it alleges conspired with other parts makers to fix wire harness prices. The industry's current challenge to develop lighter and more sustainable vehicles requires even greater cooperation. It's an expensive quest for even the deepest pockets, so the winners will likely be those that find partners to share the costs. Automakers and suppliers have always needed one another, but never more than today.
Source: Automotive News
Share: LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

[back to top]

Is EV Charging Technology the Next Challenge for the Electric Vehicle Industry?

It would be foolish and wrong to suggest that the electric vehicle market is about to break into the mass market but the signs are that interest is increasing, sales are set to double in the US and recent price reductions have certainly caught the attention of potential buyers. However, there is a potentially difficult situation approaching the EV industry in the shape of charging technology which could be the key to the short to medium-term take-up of this ever popular mode of transport. At this moment in time the three main technologies available to the EV charging sector are very different and so far incompatible. This means that businesses, local authorities and individuals looking to install EV charging facilities will need to choose between the three options available in the knowledge that potentially at least one of these options could fall by the wayside in the future. This could lead to a significant waste of investment funding in the short to medium term until a general electric vehicle charging protocol can be agreed. All of the parties involved in the electric vehicle charging market have been in discussions but at this moment in time, much as we saw with the old video technology in its early days, no party is giving way to its competitor.
Source: Hydrogen Fuel News
Share: LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

[back to top]

Detroit's Devotion to the Car Paved Way For its Undoing

In the Detroit Historical Museum, a Cadillac body is lowered again and again onto a chassis. Mannequins represent workers. Nearby murals show bustling streetscapes that have long since disappeared. Among the institution's collection of about 65 classic cars are a 1924 Hupmobile Roadster, a 1950 Packard Deluxe Eight and a 1963 pre-production Ford Mustang. The future of that past is in doubt: They are among assets that may be sold to pay creditors in the largest U.S. municipal bankruptcy. Just as Detroit may not be able to keep the symbols of its proud past, it also must overcome their legacy. The auto business, which by 1950 made Detroit the fourth-largest U.S. city, also enabled its destruction and depopulation.
Source: Bloomberg
Share: LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

[back to top]

Fleet Flip-Flop: Detroit 3 Are Down; Asians Pick Up Slack

The Detroit 3 slashed fleet sales in July, but Nissan North America, Hyundai-Kia and Toyota Motor Sales picked up the slack with huge gains. Domestic-brand fleet activity dropped by 15,300 units last month, down 36 percent at Chrysler Group, 9 percent at Ford Motor and 6 percent at General Motors. But three automakers made up for all but 1,700 units of the Detroit 3 decline. Fleet sales surged 87 percent at Nissan North America, 43 percent at Hyundai-Kia Automotive and 34 percent at Toyota Motor Sales. So overall, July fleet volume for the seven biggest automakers fell 1 percent to 143,800, while retail volume rose 16 percent to 983,000.
Source: Automotive News
Share: LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

[back to top]

Sheehy Auto Stores Donates $162K to Susan G. Komen Foundation

Sheehy Auto Stores have been doing their part to fight breast cancer: late last week, the company donated $162,000 to the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. But this isn't the first time Sheehy Auto has supported the cause. This donation was part of the company's 16th Annual Sheehy 5000 50-day campaign to raise awareness and funds for the charity. In fact, officials announced with this year's results, the company's total cumulative campaign donations for the Race for the Cure topped $1 million. As part of this year's campaign, the company pledged a portion of proceeds from the sale of 5,000 automobiles in 50 days to the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. And each of the 19 Sheeky dealerships through Washington, D.C.; Richmond, Va.; and Baltimore, planned community events and in support of the Sheehy 5000.
Source: Auto Remarketing
Share: LinkedIn Twitter Facebook

[back to top]

More Articles
 
Quotable
"This is the Motor City. We follow cars, we love our cars, we live in our cars and you drive everywhere."

   
-- Mike Smith, archivist at the Walter P. Reuther Library at Wayne State University, commenting on the impact of the auto industry on Detroit, Bloomberg, Aug. 10
NADA Market Beat
July Sales Down From June, But Beat July 2012
Chairman's Column
'Accelerate' Your Business at the NADA Convention in New Orleans
Videos

 
What's Driving Auto Sales? (NADAFrontPage.com)


 Audi Scores High with Dealers (NADAFrontPage.com)


 NADA Foundation Helps Tornado Victims (NADAFrontPage.com)

More Videos

NADA Webinars
(All webinars begin at 1 p.m. ET. Click webinar title to register.) 

- Aug. 21: Redefine the Aftermarket Customer Experience

- Aug. 28: Profit Paradigm: Stop the Big Squeeze

 For more information about the webinars, click here.

NADA Foundation News
Richard Strauss Inspires Family to Support Community Causes (NADAFrontPage.com)

NADA Foundation Makes Gift to Families First Health Center (Seacoastonline.com, Portsmouth, N.H.)

Peconic Bay Medical Center School of Radiology Receives Ambassador Grant (Riverheadlocal.com, Riverhead, N.Y.)
 
Search Back Issues | Unsubscribe | Subscribe | Manage your subscription | email us
NADA For more information on NADA, visit www.nada.org or contact NADA, 8400 Westpark Drive, McLean, VA 22102. This email may contain an advertisement of NADA products and services. Any opinions or statements contained herein do not necessarily reflect the views of NADA. Factual errors are the responsibility of the listed publication. If you are a franchised new-car or -truck dealer and would like to become a member of NADA, please visit the Join NADA section of www.nada.org. Questions or comments concerning NADA Headlines content may be directed to publicaffairs@nada.org .