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November 16, 2016 FacebookTwitterFlickrRSSSEND TO A FRIENDPRINT
Inside this issue
Human Drivers Will Bully Robot Cars, Says CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA
U.S. Auto Sales Seen Falling in 2017, With Trucks Aiding Profit
Trump Effect Mostly A Plus For Auto Sales, Dealer Group Economist Says
NADA Forecasts 2017 U.S. New Vehicle Sales to Remain Above 17 Million
Autonomous-Car Proliferation Decades Away, U.S. Regulator Says
Top Stories
Human Drivers Will Bully Robot Cars, Says CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA


Dietmar Exler, president and CEO of Mercedes-Benz USA, offers insights into consumer expectations on autonomous driving at AutoConference LA on Nov. 15, 2016.

Dietmar Exler, chief executive of Mercedes-Benz USA, is often asked why it's taking so long to develop self-driving cars. It’s not technology, he tells them. That’s advancing fast. “The real issue,” he said, “is humans.” The coexistence of human drivers and robot cars, to be precise. It’s not clear yet how well that will go. Speaking at AutoConference LA, an event that runs at the same time as the L.A. Auto Show and that is co-hosted by J.D. Power and the National Automobile Dealers Assn., Exler said even if completely driverless cars were available now, they’d be sharing the road with traditional cars for 20 to 25 years. Some people are afraid of robots taking over. Exler is worried that humans will “bully” driverless cars.
Source: Los Angeles Times

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U.S. Auto Sales Seen Falling in 2017, With Trucks Aiding Profit

U.S. sales of cars and light trucks will probably fall next year by the equivalent of a single factory’s output, analysts and economists say. And they’re just fine with that. Deliveries may drop to about 17.2 million light vehicles next year, the average of 10 analysts’ estimates in a Bloomberg survey. That would be about 1 percent to 2 percent fewer than the projections for this year’s total. As retail demand softens, the biggest automakers are trimming production, particularly of slow-selling car models. “It’s still a great year,” Steven Szakaly, economist for the National Automobile Dealers Association, said of the outlook for 2017. “Plus-17 million is fantastic, especially when you think about the mix, which still going to be probably 60-40 in favor of light trucks,” which are more profitable than cars. He predicts 17.1 million sales, down from about 17.4 million or 17.5 million this year.
Source: Bloomberg

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Trump Effect Mostly A Plus For Auto Sales, Dealer Group Economist Says

The Trump administration probably gives the U.S. economy in general and auto sales in particular a boost over the medium and potentially the long term as well, once markets get over the short-term shock of Trump’s surprise win, said the chief economist for the National Automobile Dealers Association. “The reduction of regulatory burden could be a huge benefit to banking, automotive, or other industries that we look at, such as oil, or coal, or gas,” said NADA’s Steven Szakaly, at the Los Angeles Auto Show press preview today. “These are all net benefits.” Lower corporate taxes and increased infrastructure spending are also among Trump’s “stated or understood policy objectives,” Szakaly said in a written article NADA distributed to its members last week.
Source: Forbes.com

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NADA Forecasts 2017 U.S. New Vehicle Sales to Remain Above 17 Million

U.S. auto sales will stay above 17 million for a third straight year in 2017, Steven Szakaly, chief economist of the National Automobile Dealers Association, said as the group issued its annual forecast. He predicted 2017 sales of 17.1 million light vehicles today at an economic briefing ahead of the Los Angeles Auto Show. He expects volume to finish out this year at 17.4 million, falling slightly short of 2015’s record of 17.47 million.
Source: Automotive News

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Autonomous-Car Proliferation Decades Away, U.S. Regulator Says

NHTSA head Mark Rosekind says it will take 20 to 30 years to cycle out older vehicles

Self-driving cars won’t dominate American roadways for decades given millions of older vehicles consumers own, the top U.S. federal highway safety regulator said. Traditional auto makers, suppliers and Silicon Valley giants and startups alike are racing to develop autonomous vehicles. But there are roughly 250 million cars and trucks currently on U.S. roadways that are more than a decade old on average, highlighting potentially long lead times before vehicles that predominantly drive themselves proliferate, Mark Rosekind, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, said Tuesday.
Source: The Wall Street Journal

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      "The reduction of regulatory burden could be a huge benefit to banking, automotive, or other industries that we look at, such as oil, or coal, or gas. These are all net benefits."

          -- NADA Chief Economist Steven Szakaly, commenting on the new administration, Forbes.com, Nov. 15
       
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