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June 26, 2017 FacebookTwitterFlickrRSSSEND TO A FRIENDPRINT
Inside this issue
Cybersecurity Push May Tie Up Autonomous-Car Legislation
Key Safety Systems to Acquire Takata for $1.59 Billion in Bankruptcy Deal
Plenty to Watch in Last Half of '17
U.S. Auto Sales Aren't About To Fall Off A Cliff, Long-Term Conditions Bode Well-Report
Cities Lure Self-Driving Car Jobs in a Gold Rush
Jeep Tops American-Made List, Bumping Toyota
Top Stories
Cybersecurity Push May Tie Up Autonomous-Car Legislation

Automakers, senators at odds over best approach

Consensus is growing on the need for national legislation to govern autonomous-vehicle development, but cybersecurity protection for connected vehicles looms as a potential area of conflict. High-profile Democrats on the Senate Commerce Committee are pushing for mandatory federal standards to defend against hackers taking control of vehicles or interrupting wireless communications and deliberately causing accidents.
Source: Automotive News

Editor's note: NADA fully appreciates the public’s concerns regarding the safety of autonomous technologies and is working closely with federal and state governments to see that those concerns are addressed. The members of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and the Association of Global Automakers have adopted a set of automotive privacy principles that represent a proactive industry effort to protect the privacy interests of consumers of connected and automated vehicles. NADA worked with the manufacturer trade associations in the drafting of these principles and we encourage dealers to review and understand the principles, as dealers will play a critical role in explaining those principles and related privacy issues to consumers. NADA recognizes that the success of autonomous systems directly hinges on public acceptance.

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Key Safety Systems to Acquire Takata for $1.59 Billion in Bankruptcy Deal

After more than a year of negotiations, Key Safety Systems has reached a deal to acquire Takata Corp. for $1.59 billion as part of a pre-packaged bankruptcy in the U.S. and Japan. Under the deal, Sterling Heights [Mich.] based-Key Safety proposed to acquire all global Takata assets and operations, except those tied to the phase-stabilized ammonium nitrate airbag inflators business. Malfunction of Takata's airbag inflators led to at least 16 deaths and a $1 billion fine in the U.S.
Source: Crain's Detroit Business

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Plenty to Watch in Last Half of '17

U.S. auto sales are running short of last year's record pace nearing the halfway point of 2017. Light trucks are hot. Cars are not. But while volume has fallen 2 percent through May, several old-fashioned races are shaping up to keep the second half of the year lively.
Source: Automotive News

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U.S. Auto Sales Aren't About To Fall Off A Cliff, Long-Term Conditions Bode Well-Report

Talk of an imminent sharp dive in U.S. auto sales is economically illiterate and ignores evidence that a shakeout normally requires a recession and rising unemployment to poison the market’s health. The idea that consumer lending is in crisis is also wrong, and worries that long-term threats to car sales because the young are eschewing driving in favor of Uber-like car hiring and sharing, ignores the fact most sales come from older people.
Source: Forbes

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Cities Lure Self-Driving Car Jobs in a Gold Rush

Detroit among leading hot spots for share of billion-dollar business

The development of self-driving cars has pitched a handful of cities into a new gold rush, a chance to be on the forefront of a new technology that will give rise to billion-dollar companies and thousands of new jobs. The stakes are enormous. Last year, Goldman Sachs projected the market for advanced driver assistance systems and autonomous vehicles would grow from about $3 billion in 2015 to $96 billion in 2025 and $290 billion in 2035.
Source: USA Today/Detroit Free Press

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Jeep Tops American-Made List, Bumping Toyota

Two Jeep SUVs assembled in Ohio — the Wrangler and the Cherokee — topped the Cars.com list of most American-made vehicles in a shake-up for the closely followed index. The two vehicles made by Japanese automakers that previously topped the list, the Toyota Camry and Honda Accord, have dropped out of the top 10, illustrating the complexity in determining what qualifies as genuinely American-made.
Source: USA Today/Detroit Free Press

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Quotable
"Once a vehicle connects to the Internet, it is hackable."

    -- Yoni Heilbronn, chief marketing officer for Argus Cyber Security in Israel, commenting on cybersecurity protection for connected vehicles, Automotive News, June 24

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