NADA Headlines - 06/16/2017 (Plain Text Version)

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Human Drivers Are Afraid to Hand the Wheel to Robots

Autonomous autos are advancing so rapidly that companies like Uber Technologies Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo are beginning to offer robot rides to everyday consumers. But it turns out the traveling public may not be ready. A recent survey by the American Automobile Association found that more than three-quarters of Americans are afraid to ride in a self-driving car. And it’s not just Baby Boomers growing increasingly fearful of giving up the wheel to a computer, a J.D. Power study shows -- it’s almost every generation. “One of the greatest deterrents to progress in this field is consumer acceptance,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao told Bloomberg News last week at a department-sponsored conference in Detroit. “If there’s public concern about safety, security and privacy, we will be limited in our ability to help advance this technology.”
Source: Bloomberg

Editor's note: NADA fully appreciates the public’s concerns regarding the safety of autonomous technologies and is working closely with federal and state governments to see that those concerns are addressed. The members of the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and the Association of Global Automakers have adopted a set of automotive privacy principles that represent a proactive industry effort to protect the privacy interests of consumers of connected and automated vehicles. NADA worked with the manufacturer trade associations in the drafting of these principles and we encourage dealers to review and understand the principles, as dealers will play a critical role in explaining those principles and related privacy issues to consumers. The manufacturers have committed to comply with the privacy principles no later than Model Year 2018. NADA recognizes that the success of autonomous systems directly hinges on public acceptance.

U.S. States Could Not Set Self-Driving Car Rules Under Republican Plan

California and other states would be barred from setting their own rules governing design and testing of self-driving cars, while federal regulators would be blocked from demanding pre-market approval for autonomous vehicle technology, according to a U.S. House Republican proposal reviewed by Reuters on Thursday. The draft legislation, while far from becoming law, still represents a victory for General Motors Co, Alphabet Inc, Tesla Inc and other automakers and technology companies seeking to persuade Congress and the Trump administration to pre-empt rules under consideration in California, New York and other states that could limit deployment of self-driving vehicles.
Source: Reuters
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Takata Plans to File for Bankruptcy as Soon as Next Week, Source Says

Takata Corp. plans to file for bankruptcy as soon as next week, paving the way for a sale of the 84-year-old Japanese air-bag maker behind the biggest safety recall in automotive history. The supplier is expected to seek protection in its home country first, with its U.S. subsidiary filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy shortly thereafter, according to a person familiar with the matter, who asked not to identified because the matter isn’t public and the timing could change.
Source: Bloomberg
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Trump Administration Backs Away from Fight Over California's Power to Set Rules for Cars and Trucks

The Trump administration is backing off its threat to revoke California’s unique authority to set its own tough pollution standards for cars and trucks — rules that have become a crucial tool for states to combat climate change without help from Washington. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt assured lawmakers on Thursday that his agency is not currently looking to take away the power that California has used for decades to reduce emissions that cause smog and heat up the planet.
Source: Los Angeles Times
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Researchers Who Targeted VW Diesel Cheating Turn Sights on Fiat Chrysler

The researchers who helped uncover diesel emissions test cheating at Volkswagen are now accusing Fiat Chrysler Automobiles of exceeding allowable pollution levels with two of its diesel vehicles. But the automaker, which has denied intentionally cheating on emissions tests, describes the results of the testing as misleading.
Source: Detroit Free Press
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Fiat Chrysler CEO Says 2018 Targets Unaffected by Diesel Woes

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles does not expect its diesel problems in the United States to have an impact on its short-term business targets, the carmaker's Chief Executive Sergio Marchionne said on Friday. The U.S. Justice Department sued FCA last month, accusing the Italian-American automaker of illegally using software to bypass emission controls in 104,000 diesel vehicles sold since 2014, in a move that could potentially lead to heavy fines.
Source: Reuters
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VW Brand CEO Sees New Models Driving Profit and Sales

Volkswagen is making headway with efforts to raise profitability at its troubled core brand and expects strong business next year thanks to a raft of new models, the division's top executive said. The world's largest automaker's core division is being restructured with thousands of job cuts and retrenchments in parts and vehicle development as it struggles to fund a post-dieselgate shift to electric cars and new technologies.
Source: Reuters
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The Race to Monetize Vehicle Data Gets More Crowded as BMW Hooks Up with IBM

As cars and trucks get ever more packed with sensors and connectivity, they are already generating tens of gigabytes of data per hour and will soon be producing terabytes per hour.  In this modern world, data is often deemed as good as gold, just ask Google and Facebook.
Source: Forbes
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