August 2013 Web Version | Text Only Version | Print Version
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LEADERSHIP UPDATES
NOTES FROM THE CO-EDITORS
Mary Petrón, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas, USA & Juliet Luther, Fordham University, New York, New York, USA

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BILINGUAL INTEREST SECTION (BEIS)
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ARTICLES
RECOGNIZING, VALUING, AND BUILDING ON HERITAGE CULTURES AND LANGUAGES IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROGRAMS
Joy Kreeft Peyton, Center for Applied Linguistics, Washington, DC, USA

A wealth of languages and cultures exist in the United States and the countries in which TESOL members work. The way we work with students who speak languages other than English, and societal attitudes toward those languages and cultures, may serve to limit or enrich our students and ourselves. Read More

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STRATEGIES ARE NOT ENOUGH: PERCEPTIONS MATTER, TOO!
James Cohen & Mayra Daniel, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA

Informed and inquiring teachers view the differences across cultural groups as strengths rather than deficits. When they listen to the stories of their students’ lives, they discover a wealth of cultural and social capital. Read More

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SUMMARIES OF RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS
RECONCEPTUALIZING BILINGUAL PEDAGOGY: EMERGING TRENDS IN WESTERN CANADA
Rahat Naqvi, Elaine Schmidt, & Marlene Krickhan, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Bilingual programs in Canada have been strongly impacted by the traditional pedagogy of French immersion, including strict segregation of learning by language and subject. This article examines the Spanish Bilingual program in an urban Canadian school district and highlights challenges faced by the clash of tradition and innovation. Read More

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CLASSROOM CONNECTIONS
HARMONIZING AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH IN INTEGRATED LEARNING COURSES
Paige E. Franklin, & Jane Nickerson, Gallaudet University, Washington, DC, USA

This article advocates the "harmonizing" American Sign Language and English in the classroom. The authors provide examples of the ways in which they instruct and require Gallaudet university students to create products in both languages. Read More

THREE REASONS TO FLIP YOUR CLASSROOM
Helaine Marshall, Long Island University, Brookville, New York, USA

In flipped learning, students access course content on their own outside of class and use class time to interact with their instructor and peers about the content. This article examines how flipped learning can be implemented with English learners and the reasons it holds promise for their classroom success. Read More

AUTO-/BIOGRAPHIES IN THE 21st CENTURY: DIGITAL STORYTELLING AND MULTILINGUAL LEARNERS
Natalia Ward, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA & Amber Warren, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

This article describes multimodal storytelling activities in the auto-/biographical genre used with elementary students in an ESL program. By drawing on their personal stories, students engage in multiple ways of meaning making and are afforded the opportunity to express themselves through both new and traditional literacy practices. Read More

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