IEPIS Newsletter - August 2014 (Plain Text Version)

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In this issue:
Leadership Updates
•  LETTER FROM THE CHAIR
•  LETTER FROM THE EDITORS
Articles
•  CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING: A KEY ELEMENT IN SUCCESSFUL LANGUAGE LEARNING
•  GUIDING STUDENTS BEYOND THE TEXT: CONNECTING READING AND WRITING
•  AN ELECTIVE COURSE TO HELP STUDENTS PREPARE FOR TRANSITION FROM IEP TO MAINSTREAM CLASSES
•  ONE IEP STUDENT'S EXPERIENCE WITH ENGLISH-ONLY
•  TEACHING TIP: EXTEMPORANEOUS LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT
•  MEET THE MEMBER
Community News
•  ABOUT THIS MEMBER COMMUNITY
•  NEWSLETTER SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

 

TEACHING TIP: EXTEMPORANEOUS LANGUAGE ASSESSMENT

A quick technique I would like to share with my fellow teachers is one that I learned long ago while getting my CELTA, but I still use in my classes today. When students have a partner/group speaking activity, I circulate with a small notepad where I have made three columns headed with the letters P, G, and M. The P is for pronunciation errors, the G for grammar errors, and the M for meaning (vocabulary) errors. When a student makes an error in one of those areas, I write that error in one of the columns. For example, if we have just learned a grammar point for making suggestions with “Why don’t we…” and I hear a student use the form “Why didn’t we…” (changing the verb to past tense, and no longer making a suggestion ), I write the incorrect form the student used under my ‘G’ column. When the activity is finished, I write all the errors I heard during the activity on the board and then as a group, we practice the correct grammar, pronunciation, or meaning. This function of the columns is to remind myself why I wrote down a specific word(s). I never specify which student made a mistake, but turn the mistakes into teaching points for the whole class.


Emily LaRue has taught ESL for more than 10 years in Asia, Europe, and the United States. She currently teaches at The Language Company, an IEP, in Fort Wayne, IN.