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LEADERSHIP UPDATES
LETTER FROM THE COEDITORS
Cristina Sanchez-Martin, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania, USA
Şeyma Toker, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA
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LETTER FROM THE IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR
Doaa Rashed, Rutgers University-New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA
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LETTER FROM THE CHAIR
Mai Mowafy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
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ARTICLES
ASSERTING RACIAL IDENTITY TO UNPACK THE INVISIBLE KNAPSACK OF WHITENESS IN TESOL
Quanisha Charles, Jefferson Community & Technical College, Kentucky, USA

This article calls for explicit assertion of one’s racial identity in ELT scholarship as critical to being more inclusive and proactive in dismantling racism in TESOL. To avoid acknowledging the implications of one’s racial identity maintains a safety net for white supremacy and the perpetuity of racism within TESOL. We must be courageously open and willing to engage racialized discourses that affect our community as a whole. Read More

DISRUPTING OPPRESSIVE IDEOLOGIES IN ELT: A RACIOLINGUISTIC AND TRANSLINGUAL PERSPECTIVE
Ramata Diallo, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, USA

This article explores the pervasive ideologies embedded in the dichotomy of NNEST and NEST in the ELT field. It expands the discussion by using a raciolinguistics framework to uncover how the ELT field uses race to privilege NESTs. Moreover, it suggests an antiracist and translingual perspective to disrupt this dichotomy and empower NNESTs. Read More

MY BATTLE AGAINST NATIVE SPEAKER FALLACY: IS CALLING IT BITTERSWEET ENOUGH?
Romaisha Rahman, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA

Through this piece, Romaisha Rahman tells her stories of how she experienced language bias in the US as an international nonnative English-speaking student and an educator and how she intellectually fought against it to stand out as an individual, instead of trying to blend in. Read More

UNDERSTANDING RESEARCHER REFLEXIVITY THROUGH THE INTERSECTIONAL IDENTITIES OF A MAMA PHD STUDENT
Oksana Moroz, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA

The role of reflexivity in the process of becoming a scholar for an international Mama PhD student is the focus of this paper. Through the usage of reflexive vignettes, Oksana Moroz describes her personal experiences as a novice researcher and adds to the NNEST area of inquiry on intersectional identities. Read More

ABOUT THIS COMMUNITY
NNEST NEWSLETTER CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
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ABOUT THE "NONNATIVE" ENGLISH SPEAKER TEACHERS IN TESOL INTEREST SECTION (NNEST-IS)
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