October 2014 Web Version | Text Only Version | Print Version
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Leadership Updates
LETTER FROM THE CHAIR
Veronica Sardegna, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
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LETTER FROM THE CHAIR-ELECT
Amanda Huensch, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
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LETTER FROM THE EDITORS
Demetria Li & Lauren Lovvorn, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA
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Articles
LEARNERS CAN TEACH PRONUNCIATION, TOO: BUILDING AUTONOMY THROUGH PEER INSTRUCTION
Keli Yerian, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA
We all want our students to be autonomous learners, but when we teach pronunciation, we tend to rely heavily on teacher modeling and correction. This article provides four examples of activities for achieving a range of pronunciation objectives with peer-teaching formats. Read More
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PROMOTING VOWEL FLUENCY WITH NATIVE SPEAKER UTTERANCES
DJ Kaiser, Webster University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
English language learners of all levels and in both ESL and EFL settings struggle with contrasting the vowel sounds of English. Rather than using traditional “key” and “chart” words that they often already mispronounce, this article advocates for using native speaker utterances in language instruction to promote vowel fluency. Read More
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USING LITERARY DEVICES TO TEACH SPEECH AND PRONUNCIATION IN AN ESL CREATIVE WRITING CLASS
Dr. Sumeeta Patnaik, INTO-Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia, USA
Creative writing classes can provide ESL students with an opportunity to practice speaking and pronunciation through exercises using literary devices. Using literary devices in speech and writing allows students to process language at a cognitive level and gain deeper proficiency in the language.
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THE INTERACTIONAL SYLLABUS: TEACHING CONVERSATION
John Campbell-Larsen, Kwansei Gakuin University, Nishinomiya, Japan
Speaking is the central skill of the four skills, and conversation is the central skill within speaking. But conversation is often regarded as a trivial activity, lacking the form and the seriousness of academic talk. This article challenges that assumption and describes the content and methodology of a conversation class.
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ABOUT THIS COMMUNITY
ABOUT SPLIS STEERING COMMITTEE ROLES
Char Heitman, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA

Professional organizations could not function without the support and service of their members, and TESOL International Association is no exception. This article explores the roles in which SPLIS members can serve their Interest Section.
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A SHORT (FIERCE) HISTORY OF HOW SPLIS CAME TO BE
Judy B. Gilbert, SPLIS Historian, Consultant, Orinda, California, USA

Our wonderful Interest Section has not always existed. Learn how we came to be the community that we are in a short, and fierce, historical overview of the creation of our Interest Section. Read More

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