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LEADERSHIP UPDATES
LETTER FROM THE EDITORS
Anastasia Khawaja & Riah Werner
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ARTICLES
SPEAKING UP AND PUSHING BACK: WOMEN OF COLOR IN THE ACADEMY
The Sister Scholars: Rachel Grant, Ryuko Kubota, Angel Lin, Suhanthie Motha, Gertrude Tinker Sachs, Stephanie Vandrick, & Shelley Wong
A longtime collective of seven TESOL women scholars describes the importance of sisterhood, collegiality, solidarity, and mutual support in the often difficult environment of higher education, especially for women of color. They discuss reasons for and ways of “speaking up and pushing back” in academic institutions. Read More
DECENTERING WHITENESS IN TESOL
Scott Stillar, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Though TESOL educators tend to hold more progressive values regarding issues of racism and White supremacy than many of their academic counterparts, the field is still strongly centered on White normativity. In this article, Stillar discusses the need for an ideological frame shift in order to decenter Whiteness and confront systemic racism both inside and outside the TESOL classroom. Read More
COLLABORATION UNDER OCCUPATION: ALLYSHIP FOR PALESTINE
Anastasia Khawaja, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, & Liana Smith, Montgomery College, Rockville, Maryland, USA
How did two White American women end up chairing the Palestinian Educators and Friends Professional Learning Network at TESOL? The answer to this question teases out an interesting discussion about marginalization and allyship in academia, as scholars, as educators, and as colleagues who work across various racial lines in areas such as activism and other social groups. This article discusses a brief history of this professional learning network, our role as activists and allies, and our ongoing collaboration abroad. Read More
KEEP THEM FLYING: REUSABLE MENSTRUAL PADS AND GIRLS' EDUCATION IN TANZANIA
Catherine James Njau, Tanzanian English Language Teachers Association, Moshi, Tanzania
Menstruation is an important issue affecting girls’ education, but teachers and educators rarely speak about it. The reality is that many young girls often don’t have a safe space to discuss the challenges they face during their periods with a trusted adult. The girls are more likely to miss school, causing their academic performance to suffer as a result. In this article, Catherine James Njau outlines why it is necessary to teach about menstruation in schools and how she, a Tanzanian teacher, uses drama to help girls open up about this taboo issue. Read More
OUT WITH THE TEXTBOOK, IN WITH THE COMPUTER: EMPOWERING IMMIGRANT UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES IN THE ESL CLASSROOM
Lisana Mohamed, INTO University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA
In 2006, the U.S. Census Bureau stated that more than 50% of the workers in service positions (custodial work, restaurant workers, retail work) are Latino/Latina or are native-born but descendants of this group. Immigrant Latino/Latina custodial workers often have limited opportunities to improve their English language skills; they are often invisible to mainstream society and they occupy a non-dominant position in society making it more difficult to find their way out of this vacuum where facility in English is a necessity. Read More
TRANSGENDER UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE IN MEXICO
David Ruiz Guzmán, Mexican Studies Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa
These notes compile the story of two students in Michoacan, Mexico, who experience their transgender process which they successfully accomplished. Nevertheless, it was a fascinating process to witness, academically speaking, since binary language took place and the community reluctance to accept the new terms and names made these two processes not that easy to go through. A questionnaire was given to these two students in order to fully understand their experience. Read More
BEYOND HE/SHE: THE POWER OF LANGUAGE IN MAKING ESOL ENVIRONMENTS INCLUSIVE FOR TRANS AND NONBINARY STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES
Gabriel Winer, Berkeley City College, Berkeley, California, USA
As ESOL instructors and materials writers, we hold an important power: the opportunity to affirm the humanity of those who do not fit neatly into the male/female binary with small changes in our classrooms that have deep impacts. One of those small changes is only four letters: embracing the evolution of English grammar to include the singular theyRead More
ABOUT THIS COMMUNITY
ADVOCACY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE SESSIONS AT THE TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION
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SRIS MISSION AND GOALS
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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE ARTS
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SRIS Open Meeting
Please join us at our open meeting on Wednesday, March 13th from 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm in the Walnut room. We will also livestream the meeting on our facebook page.
Next Issue's Theme: Social Justice and the Arts
How do social justice and the arts intersect with language teaching? What arts projects have you done with your students on social issues? Submissions due 15 April, 2019.

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