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LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

Luis Javier Pentón Herrera and Ethan Trinh

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ARTICLES
THE LUMBEE INDIAN COMMUNITY OF EAST BALTIMORE

Ashley Minner, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Learn more about the largest tribal group within Baltimore’s American Indian community, the Lumbee, by reading a little bit of their history in the city and about efforts to bring more recognition to it. Also included are several collaboratively produced portraits of community members, from The Exquisite Lumbee project.
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SUPPORTING INDIGENOUS MAYAN IDENTITY IN U.S. CLASSROOMS
Elizabeth Jenner, Independent, Princeton, New Jersey, USA
Maria Konkel, Independent, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Think you are teaching English to a U.S. classroom of Spanish-speaking Latinos? Maybe you are not. In this article, two scholars of the contemporary Maya discuss why and how Mayan children may hide their Indigenous identity within U.S. classrooms. The authors recommend specific resources you can use to construct an educational space that is psychologically safe and allows students to express their indigeneity in their own ways.
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INVISIBLE LITERACIES AMONG MULTILINGUAL CHILDREN: A REFLECTION

Lydiah Kananu Kiramba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA

Home literacies in children’s Indigenous languages are foundational and should be built upon in their education.
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LESSONS FROM GUATEMALA: FEAR OF CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC LOSS AND A CURRICULUM OF URGENCY

Lydia A. Saravia, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA

In 2014 the author conducted an ethnographic research at a predominant Indigenous preservice teacher institution in Guatemala. The pedagogical and curricular lessons she labeled as “curriculum of urgency” seem poignant given today’s migration pattern and political and educative responses. In this article, she revisits the curriculum of urgency as a reflection of the possible cultural and linguistic loss for Indigenous migrants in the U.S. Read More
DECOLONIZING MY PEDAGOGY, INDIGENIZING MY BEING

Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Independent, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA

In this article, the author shares his story of transformation as he learned from one of his Indigenous Latinx students, Diego, to decolonize his pedagogy and perspectives about Indigenous peoples around the world. Read More
LANGUAGE AND LAND HAVE ALWAYS BEEN IN COMMUNICATION: UNSETTLING ENGLISH PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES

Judith Landeros, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA
Pablo Montes, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA

In this article, the authors argue that teaching is a political act and educators have a responsibility to reflect on their practice as they prepare to teach and engage with youth that have been and continue to be affected by the current immigration sociopolitical climate. The urgency for this call to action lies both in the authors’ physical proximity to the border but also their own genealogies, migrations, and his/her/their stories. Read More
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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: DIVERSIFYING THE TESOL CURRICULUM
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