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LEADERSHIP UPDATES
LETTER FROM THE CHAIRS

Sky Lantz-Wagner, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio, USA
Federico Salas-Isnardi, College Station, Texas, USA

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LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

Trisha Dowling and John Turnbull

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ARTICLES
QELTI-AN INITIATIVE TO DISRUPT HETERONORMATIVITY IN ELT

Justin Jacobs, Sabancı University, Istanbul, Turkey

Reflections on a one-year initiative in Istanbul focusing on social justice in English language teaching. With a focus on sexism, heterosexism, and cissexism, the initiative gathered ELT professionals from EAP programs in higher educational institutions across Istanbul for monthly meetings to increase awareness and develop ways to disrupt heteronormativity in the EL classroom. Read More
A MATTER OF SOCIAL JUSTICE: THE ISSUANCE OF STUDENT VISAS

Nayereh Nouri, Alliant International University, San Diego, California, USA

Many Iranian students have had their studies disrupted by the travel ban enacted by the Trump administration in 2017. Issuances of F1 visas to Iranian students fell precipitously afterward. The new administration is urged to ease such disruptions for students of Muslim-majority countries previously affected by the ban. Read More
RESOURCES
LESSON PLAN: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONFLICTS

Helen Margaret Murray, Institute for Teacher Training, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway

This lesson plan gives practical suggestions for how to teach about Indigenous Peoples and environmental conflicts. The theoretical influences on the plan are briefly discussed, after which the structure of the plan is explained, and examples of discussion questions are presented. While this lesson plan relates to a specific topic, the suggestions have wider applications. Read More
POETRY
WHO AM I? (A 2020 REFLECTION)

Warifa Sobh, Dearborn, Michigan, USA

In an unstable world that seems to be changing everyday, if not every second, we must try our best not to lose sight of who we are and what we ultimately stand for. In this “I Am” poem, Sobh introduces her students to who she is and what she values most in life, especially during these trying times. While every student’s life and education has been disrupted to varying extents by the pandemic (one of the many traumas experienced by most refugees), Sobh uses writing as a form of healing and bonding to nurture the teacher-student relationship--maybe one of the very few familiar connections left in the midst of all the chaos, isolation, and loneliness. Read More
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