Volume 17, Issue 2 | January 27, 2020

How to Stay Warm at Home This Winter

Simple tips from WGL Energy to keep your home warm this winter

 

 
You can keep your home warm this winter by following these simple tips:
 
  • Check your weather forecast regularly. Knowing what to expect is the first step in preparing for colder weather and winter storms.

  • Cover drafty windows with heavy-duty, clear plastic during the winter months. This simple weatherization tip will eliminate unnecessary drafts, improve energy efficiency and help save money on your heating bills.

  • Seal cracks, gaps and holes around windows and doors with caulk, weather-stripping or door sweeps. Reducing drafts around these areas is another easy way to improve energy efficiency and help save money on your heating bills.

  • Prevent water pipes from freezing. Water supply pipes that run along exterior walls that have little or no insulation, along with those in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, and kitchen cabinets are prone to freezing. During bitter cold temperatures, the American Red Cross recommends letting cold water drip from faucets served by these pipes. For an added layer of protection, open your kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the pipes inside (after ensuring any harmful household cleaning supplies and other chemicals are out of reach to children and pets).

  • Keep your thermostat steady during extra-cold periods, both during the day and at night. Maintaining a warmer temperature when you are away or sleeping may raise your heating bill, but will help to prevent a costlier repair job if your water pipes freeze and burst.

  • Properly maintain your heating system. Change your furnace filter at least once a month and protect your heat pump from the elements to improve energy efficiency. Use caution when removing snow, ice, and leaves from your outdoor unit.
 


Editor's Note

How Low Can Prices Go?

Weekly review for January 19 - January 25, 2020

 
On Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday Jan 17, 2020 was 2,947 BCF.  This was a decrease of 92 BCF from the previous week and was lower than the expectations. Inventories are now 554 BCF higher than last year at this time, 251 BCF above the 5-year average.
 
Despite the relatively cold weather experienced this last week forecasts have been getting warmer and that has continued to put significant downward pressure on prices.  For the week, PJM Western Hub 12 Month curve (Feb20-Jan21) was down 3.6% and the NYMEX natural gas 12-month curve was off 5%.  Power is at a 5-year low for 2020 and Gas is at a 5 year low for each year through 2023.

 

This past week's market information is provided as a courtesy to our customers and is not indicative of, nor should be relied upon, as representative of future transactions.



Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

Jun-19 

Jul-19 

Aug-19 

Sep-19 

Oct-19 

**Nov-19 

Normal 

 325

 472

423 

 215

38 

468 

 Actual

 341

 530

468

 346

68

568

Departure from Normal 

5%, Warmer 

12%, Warmer 

11%, Warmer 

61%, Warmer 

79%, Warmer 

21%, Colder 

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

**Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.