Volume 18, Issue 10 | July 12, 2021

EPA Emissions Calculator

We previously shared with you some tips for conserving energy, but how effective have your efforts been? Well, there’s an easy way to keep track, using the EPA Emissions Calculator.

This online tool translates the amount of energy you use into the amount of carbon dioxide gases being produced. It then provides a series of comparisons and equivalents, to help you understand those numbers better. This useful resource can also show you the impact of the amount of natural gas you use, gasoline consumed by company vehicles, and more.

Just like the EPA Emissions Calculator, WGL Energy can help you reach an environmental-friendly solution to offset your carbon footprint. Visit our website to learn more!

Source: https://www.epa.gov/energy/greenhouse-gas-equivalencies-calculator


Editor's Note

Energy Markets Take a Breather

Week in review for July 4 July 10, 2021

On Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday July 2, 2021 was 2,574 BCF.  This was an increase of 16 BCF from the previous week, below market expectations.  Inventories are now 51 BCF lower than last year at this time, and 190 BCF below the 5-year average.

Prices were up for the week, though the pace slowed from the large increases that were seen through June that resulted NYMEX prompt 12-months up 13% over the course of the month.  For this week, the NYMEX natural gas 12-month strip (Aug 21-Jul 22) ended up 1.2% and the PJM Western Hub ATC (7X24) 12-month strip was up only 0.2%.


Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

*Nov-20

*Dec-20 

*Jan-20 

*Feb-20 

*Mar-21 

*Apr-21 

Normal 

467

669

848

 677

546

236

 Actual

 321

731

819

763

435

238

Departure from Normal 

31%,
Warmer 

9%,
Colder

3%,
Warmer

13%,
Colder

20%,
Warmer

1%,
Colder

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

*Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.