Volume 18, Issue 10 | August 9, 2021

Combating Climate Change

As the effects of climate change continue to rise, reliance on renewable energy sources becomes more important than ever. Many power plants produce electricity by burning fossil fuels. Those greenhouse gases get absorbed into the atmosphere, where they’ll remain for centuries. Without immediate, comprehensive action, those CO2 emissions have the potential to raise the global temperature by anywhere from 4 to 8 degrees by the year 2100.

By switching to renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and hydro power, we can reduce the CO2 emissions that come from fossil fuels, slow the effects of climate change, and improve air and water quality in the surrounding area.

How RECs Help

Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) directly support the replacement of fossil fuels in energy generation with renewable sources. RECs also support the expansion and development of renewable sources. This leads to new jobs being created in those fields, making them more viable power sources.

To learn more about WGL Energy’s renewable energy solutions visit our website or call 1-833-61-GREEN (1-833-614-7336) to speak with one of our energy experts.

Source: https://climate.nasa.gov/faq/16/is-it-too-late-to-prevent-climate-change/


Editor's Note

One More Hot Week

Week in review for August 1 7, 2021

On Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday July 30, 2021 was 2,727 BCF. This was an increase of 13 BCF from the previous week, lower than market expectations. Inventories are now 542 BCF lower than last year at this time, and 185 BCF below the 5-year average.

Near-term prices continued their meteoric rise, with the 12-month NYMEX natural gas strip (Sept 21-Aug 22) up 41% since the start of 2021. For this week, the gas 12-month strip ended up 2.3% and the PJM Western Hub ATC (7X24) 12-month strip was up 5.0%.

It is looking like a hot spell for the PJM region next week, which may result one or more days that end up with the five highest loads of the year that are used for Capacity PLC calculation and thus influence customers’ capacity cost. WGL Energy typically issues load reduction recommendations the weekday before a potential peak day and has already issued an alert for Monday 8/9/2021. We will continue monitoring forecasts next week, and for the remainder of the summer, to advise customers of future potential peak days.

 



Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

*Feb-21

*Mar-21

Apr-21

May-21

June-21 

July-21 

Normal 

677

546

236

156

351

522

 Actual

763

435

238

119

348

492

Departure from Normal 

11%
Cooler

18%
Warmer

1%
Cooler

24%
Cooler

1%
Cooler

6%
Cooler

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

*Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.