Volume 18, Issue 10 | October 18, 2021

Green-e Energy

Did you know that WGL Energy’s Carbon Offsets and WindPower products are Green-e® Energy certified? What does this mean you may ask?

Established in 1997, Green-e Energy is the nation’s leading program for renewable energy. The program was created to provide consumer protection in the emerging and unregulated voluntary renewable energy market through clear guidelines, disclosures, and standards. It is in this program that consumers and businesses are provided with the assurance that they are reducing the environmental impact of their energy use.

To learn more about WGL Energy’s Green-e Energy certified products, visit our website or call 1-833-61-GREEN (1-833-614-7336) to speak with one of our energy experts.

Source: https://www.green-e.org/programs/energy


Editor's Note

A Tame Week For A Change

Week in review for October 10-16, 2021

On Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday October 8, 2021 was 3,369 BCF.  This was an increase of 81 BCF from the previous week, below market expectations.  Inventories are now 501 BCF lower than last year at this time, and 174 BCF below the 5-year average: improving as they have been for several weeks, but still below levels that would ease market fears of limited winter supply. 

Energy markets were a bit tamer than they have been in recent months, with the 12-month NYMEX natural gas strip (Nov 21-Oct 22) up 2.6% and the PJM Western Hub ATC (7X24) 12-month strip up 1.1%.

 


Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

April-21

May-21

June-21

July-21

Aug-21

Sep-21 

Normal 

236

156

351

522

445

255

 Actual

238

119

348

492

492

241

Departure from Normal 

1%
Cooler

24%
Cooler

1%
Cooler

6%
Cooler

11%
Warmer

6%
Cooler

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

*Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.