Volume 18, Issue 10 | November 1, 2021

Green Engineering

Green engineering is the design, commercialization, and use of processes and products in a way that reduces pollution, promotes sustainability, and minimizes risk to human health and the environment without sacrificing economic viability and efficiency.

Incorporating green engineering in the early development phase of a process or product pushes us further on our path of reducing environmental impact. Green engineering will allow us to:

  • Holistically use systems analysis and integrate environmental impact assessment tools.
  • Conserve and improve natural ecosystems while protecting human health and well-being.
  • Use life-cycle thinking in all engineering activities.

To learn more about you can reduce your environmental impact and go green with WGL Energy visit our website or call 1-833-61-GREEN (1-833-614-7336) to speak with one of our energy experts.

Source: epa.gov/green-engineering/about-green-engineering#definition


Editor's Note

Prices Up

Week in review for October 24-30, 2021

On Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday October 22, 2021 was 3,548 Bcf. This was an increase of 87 Bcf from the previous week, in line with market expectations.  Inventories are now 403 Bcf lower than last year at this time, and 126 Bcf below the 5-year average. As we have been noting, these deficits have been improving, on absolute terms, for several weeks. However, there is basically one week left to make up any ground before the usual withdrawal season begins in November.

The 12-month NYMEX natural gas strip (Dec 21-Nov 22) was up 4.5% and the PJM Western Hub ATC (7X24) 12-month strip up 2.4% (note: reported weekly changes are from close of business Thursday 10/21/2021 to 10/28/2021). 


Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

April-21

May-21

June-21

July-21

Aug-21

Sep-21 

Normal 

236

156

351

522

445

255

 Actual

238

119

348

492

492

241

Departure from Normal 

1%
Cooler

24%
Cooler

1%
Cooler

6%
Cooler

11%
Warmer

6%
Cooler

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

*Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.