Volume 18, Issue 10 | March 7, 2022

Greener Cleanups

A greener cleanup is a more sustainable approach to purifying contaminated sites. Activities involved with decontaminating sites expend energy, water, and other natural resources. As a result, these projects create an environmental footprint of its own.

Greener cleanups that are environmentally more protective can be achieved by optimizing the performance of technology and field work. With this gained knowledge, we are able to take the steps needed to minimize those footprints and maximize environmental outcomes.

To learn more about how you can achieve a more sustainable solution with WGL Energy, visit http://wglenergy.us/gogreen or call 1-833-61-GREEN (1-833-614-7336) to speak with one of our energy experts.

Source:https://www.epa.gov/greenercleanups


Editor's Note

Prices Down Then up for the Week

Week in review for February 27-March 5, 2022

Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday February 25, 2022, was 1,643 Bcf. This was a decrease of 139 BCF from the previous week, in line with market expectations. Inventories are now 216 Bcf lower than last year this time last year and 255 Bcf below the 5-year average, close to the 5-year minimum.  

Despite continued data indicating high inflation rates in the U.S. and global commodity price spikes due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, U.S. forward energy markets had fallen 3-5% earlier in the week, though did rebound to end up for the week. The 12-month NYMEX natural gas strip (Apr22-Mar23) was up 1.1% and the 12-month PJM STD 7x24 up 3.0% for the week ending 3/3/2022.


Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Jan-22

Normal 

445

255

55

467

669

848

 Actual

492

241

92

513

541

943

Departure from Normal 

6%
Cooler

11%
Warmer

6%
Cooler

10%
Cooler

19%
Warmer

11%
Cooler

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

*Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.