Volume 18, Issue 10 | March 21, 2022

Green How You Clean

Spring is almost here, so you know what that means...spring cleaning! Store-bought cleaners consist of extra chemicals that you might not want in your home. However, making your own cleaning products allows you to:

  • Improve air quality
  • Save money
  • Eliminate resistant bacteria
  • Control the ingredients
  • Ensure the safety of children and pets

Whether you’re preparing for your annual spring-cleaning project or simply want to tidy up around the house, here are some green cleaners you can make to keep your home clean and fresh this spring.

If you are reading about green cleaners, also learn more about how you can have clean green energy in your home or business. Visit our website http://wglenergy.us/gogreen or call 1-833-61-GREEN (1-833-614-7336) to speak with one of our energy experts.

Sources: https://www.2-10.com/blog/homemade-green-household-cleaners/,https://ernearmetx.com/blog/the-benefits-of-homemade-cleaning-products-in-2020/


Editor's Note

Prices Up Again

Week in review for March 13-19, 2022

Thursday, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage as of Friday March 11, 2022, was 1,440 Bcf. This was a decrease of 79 Bcf from the previous week, higher than market expectations. Inventories are now 344 BCF lower than the same time last year, and 304 Bcf below the 5-year average, close to the 5-year minimum.  

Despite warm weather decreasing heating demand in the United States, prices were up for the week, riding the global commodity wave higher. The 12-month NYMEX natural gas strip (Apr22-Mar23) was up 6.6% and the 12-month PJM STD 7x24 up 3.6% for the week ending 3/17/2022.


Weather

Washington, D.C. Area Cooling/Heating Degree Days

  

 

Aug-21

Sep-21

Oct-21

Nov-21

Dec-21

Jan-22

Normal 

445

255

55

467

669

848

 Actual

492

241

92

513

541

943

Departure from Normal 

6%
Cooler

11%
Warmer

6%
Cooler

10%
Cooler

19%
Warmer

11%
Cooler

Cooling degree day (CDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65-degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is below 65, there are no cooling degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is greater than 65 degrees, then subtract 65 from the average temperature to find the number of cooling degree days.

*Heating degree day (HDD) data is for the Washington, D.C. area and is calculated by comparing the day’s average temperature to a 65 degree baseline. If the day’s average temperature is above 65, there are no heating degree days that day. If the day’s average temperature is less than 65 degrees, then subtract that average temperature from 65 to find the number of heating degree days.